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JRM

Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics

ISSN : 0915-3942(Print) / 1883-8049(Online)
DOI : 10.20965/jrm.issn.1883-8049
Editors-in-Chief : Yoshihiro Takita (National Defence Academy of Japan)
Deputy Editor-in-Chief : Koichi Osuka (Osaka University),
Takayuki Tanaka (Hokkaido University)

Indexed in ESCI, Scopus, Compendex (Ei)

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2018-09-02T02:49:30+0000

Vol.15 (2003)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Microrobots

Special Issue on Microrobots

: p. 581
Microrobots
Hidenori Ishihara

Micromechatronics has become a key issue in engineering. Robotics and mechatronics are a global concern. Micromechatronics contributes especially to the development of electrical and mechanical systems through miniaturization and advanced functions. Micromechatronics was defined by Prof. Fukuda, Prof. Fujita et. al in the 1980’s. In 1980’s, Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) was developed in the USA and then expanded to Japan and Germany. In the same time frame, devices based on precious machining technology were miniaturized in Japan and Switzerland as Michromachine. MEMS combines electronics and mechatronics and promotes new-conceptual devices such as intellectual sensors, e.g., pressure and acceleration sensors. Precious machining has improved manufacturing and achieved the find control. Thorough these development, Micromechatronics was born as an integrated technology. This special issue introduces basic technologies and applications of micromechatronics, which includes such vital technologies as mechanical, electric, and electrical engineering, machining, and MEMS. This issue, which features several topics on micromechatronics, will give readers a welcome chance to acquaint themselves with state-of-the-art information on micromechatronics. This issue contains nine technical papers on micro robots, intelligent microsensors, and their applications, together with related letters. It opens with a paper on microsensors by Fujiyoshi et al. and the application of miniaturized motors to a robotic hand by Nishibori et al. Included also are articles on micro robots by Aoyama, Torii, Wakimoto and Guo, work on unique micromanipulation systems by Nakamura et al., and the application of micro units to robotic systems by Yamada et al. Letters discuss objectives and achievements of micro robot contests held in Japan that serve to popularize and disseminate unique mechanisms and new concepts in this exciting field. I am certain this issue will provide readers with information that is both interesting and informative. In closing, I would like to thank the authors, members of the editorial board, and the publisher, without whose hard work and careful consideration this issue would not have been possible.

: pp. 582-587
Analysis and Design of A New Micro Jerk Sensor with Viscous Coupling
Abstract
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Motohiro Fujiyoshi, Yutaka Nonomura, Fumihito Arai, and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 588-595
Robot Hand with Fingers Using Vibration-Type Ultrasonic Motors (Driving Characteristics)
Abstract
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Kenji Nishibori, Setsuya Kondo, Hirohisa Obata, and Shigeru Okuma
: pp. 596-601
Automatic Insemination and Incubation by Male and Female Micro Robots
Abstract
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Hisayuki Aoyama and Hideharu Takubo
: pp. 602-608
Motion of a Miniature Robot Using Three Piezoelectric Elements Controlled by Rectangular Voltage
Abstract
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Akihiro Torii, Yoshiyuki Fukaya, Kae Doki, and Akiteru Ueda
: pp. 609-615
In-Pipe Inspection Micro Robot Adaptable to Changes in Pipe Diameter
Abstract
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Shuichi Wakimoto, Koichi Suzumori, Masanori Takata, and Jun Nakajima
: pp. 616-623
A Novel Mobile Microrobot Fin for In-Pipe Inspection
Abstract
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Shuxiang Guo, Yasuhiro Sasaki, and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 624-631
Magnetic Linear Motion Mechanism of a 2-Parallel-Finger Hand for Force Operation
Abstract
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Tatsuya Nakamura and Zhiqi Liu
: pp. 632-638
Reconfigurable Parts Feeding System Using Array of Vibrators
Abstract
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Yasuhiro Yamada, Nobutaka Torii, and Yoshiaki Komura
: pp. 639-645
Miniaturized Mobile Robot Kit for Robotics Seminars for Young People
Abstract
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Hidenori Ishihara, Kimihito Yukawa, Toshio Fukuda, Fumihito Arai, and Yasuhisa Hasegawa
: pp. 646-648
Micromechanisms and Their Applications
Abstract
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Mikio Horie, Shinya Sasayama, Fumikazu Ohira, Ken'ichi Hiratsuka, Yuichi Nakazato, Yasuo Hayashibara, Takahiro Ito, Hidetsugu Terada, Ryusuke Tokui, and Teru Hayashi
: pp. 649-651
The Challenge of Micro Robot Creation at the Nippon Institute of Technology
Abstract
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Yuichi Nakazato
: pp. 652-654
Micromachines Designed and Fabricated for Micromechanism Contest
Abstract
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Hiroshi Endo
: pp. 655-657
Current and Future Arts of International Micro Robot Maze Contest
Abstract
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Hidenori Ishihara

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Rescue Robots

Special Issue on Rescue Robots

: p. 473
Rescue Robots
Koichi Osuka and Satoshi Tadokoro

This special issue brings together the many achievements on rescue robots development beginning after the Hanshin-Awaji Great Earthquake in Kobe. The earthquake that laid waste to most of Kobe, Seattle’s sister city, early on the morning of January 17, 1995, was a wakeup warning to robotics researchers who realized that the potential of their studies had not been realized in its greatest and most challenging arena – a disastrous earthquake where robots and similar strategies could have rescued people in situations where no other help or support was possible. Japanese robotics researchers set up academic working groups to study and promote such R&D. The national project involving key next-generation urban disaster prevention technologies includes the subtheme of rescue robots, with robotics researchers introducing concrete achievements. A Japanese national project had never used the term of rescue robots before then. Rescue robots range from simple instruments powered by human operators to intelligent machines able to operate virtually on their own. Some advanced rescue robots have built-in prime motive power and others use the latest in artificial intelligence. This special issue brings to readers a dozen articles introducing the many and varied achievements by Japanese robotics researchers covering a wide range of rescue robots. With this field poised to enter the main stream, these robots are close to practical application, and knowledge of their capabilities is essential to those able to utilize this latest technology in their current and future re search. This issue is a must to all who are interested in exploring the new world of robot rescue.

: pp. 474-481
Development of Small Diameter Active Hose-II for Search and Life-prolongation of Victims under Debris
Abstract
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Ato Kitagawa, Hideyuki Tsukagoshi, and Masaki Igarashi
: pp. 482-490
Development of Jumping & Rolling Inspector to Improve the Debris-traverse Ability
Abstract
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Hideyuki Tsukagoshi, Yotaro Mori, Masashi Sasaki, Takahiro Tanaka, and Ato Kitagawa
: pp. 491-500
Autonomous Flight Control System for Intelligent Aero-robot for Disaster Prevention
Abstract
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Hiroaki Nakanishi, Hiroyuki Hashimoto, Naomi Hosokawa, Koichi Inoue, and Akira Sato
: pp. 501-507
Development of Detachable Teleoperation Gripper for a Walking Robot
Abstract
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Shinichi Suganuma, Masaru Ogata, Kensuke Takita, and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 508-515
HELIOS VII: a New Tracked Arm-Equipped Vehicle
Abstract
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Michele Guarnieri, Paulo Debenest, Takao Inoh, and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 516-520
A Consideration on Rescue Robot Contest from Viewpoint of Technology Education
Abstract
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Toru Yamamoto, Takako Ichikawa, and Shoichiro Fujisawa
: pp. 521-527
Information Assistance for Search-and-Rescue by Intelligent Data Carriers and a Data Retrieval Blimp
Abstract
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Daisuke Kurabayashi, Kenichi Noda, Hajime Asama, Kuniaki Kawabata, Hayato Kaetsu, and Hiroshi Hashimoto
: pp. 528-536
Development of Simple Search Device by Person’s Power
Abstract
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Tomoharu Doi, Hisanobu Tamari, Tadashiro Kaneda, Toshitaka Umemoto, and Yasumasa Yoshitani
: pp. 537-545
Autonomous Flight Control of Unmanned Small Hobby-Class Helicopter Report 1: Hardware Development and Verification Experiments of Autonomous Flight Control System
Abstract
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Daigo Fujiwara, Jinok Shin, Kensaku Hazawa, Kazuhiro Igarashi, Dilshan Fernando, and Kenzo Nonami
: pp. 546-554
Autonomous Flight Control of Unmanned Small Hobby-Class Helicopter Report 2: Modeling Based on Experimental Identification and Autonomous Flight Control Experiments
Abstract
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Kensaku Hazawa, Jinok Shin, Daigo Fujiwara, Kazuhiro Igarashi, Dilshan Fernando, and Kenzo Nonami
: pp. 555-560
Development of Joints for Power Microrobot for Searching inside Debris
Abstract
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Koichi Suzumori, Masanori Takata, and Shuichi Wakimoto
: pp. 561-570
Development of Four-Crawler Multilink Mobile Robot MOIRA for Searching Debris
Abstract
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Koichi Osuka, and Hiroshi Kitajima
: pp. 571-578
Kinematic Identification Method for Cable-Driven Rescue Robots in Unstructured Environments
Abstract
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Satoshi Tadokoro, Richard Verhoeven, Ulrike Zwiers, Manfred Hiller, and Fumiaki Takemura

No.4

(Aug)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: pp. 361-368
Control Method for Realistic Motion in a Construction Tele-robotic System with a 3-DOF Parallel Mechanism
Abstract
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Dingxuan Zhao, Yupeng Xia, Hironao Yamada, and Takayoshi Muto
: pp. 369-376
An Electronic Nose Using Neural Networks with Effective Training Data Selection
Abstract
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Bancha Charumporn, Michifumi Yoshioka, Toru Fujinaka, and Sigeru Omatu
: pp. 377-383
Bistable Fluidic Laminar Amplifiers for Optopneumatic Interfaces
Abstract
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G. Belforte, G. Eula, M. Martinelli, T. Raparelli, and V. Viktorov
: pp. 384-390
Voice-supported Active Touch Panel Using Micro Touch Sensor with PZT Thin Film
Abstract
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Gui Ryong Kwon, Fumihito Arai, Toshio Fukuda, Koichi Itoigawa, and Yasunori Tsukahara
: pp. 391-397
Development of a Hydraulic Parallel Link Force Display -Improvement of Manipulability Using a Disturbance Observer and its Application to a Master-slave System-
Abstract
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Shigeki Kudomi, Hironao Yamada, and Takayoshi Muto
: pp. 398-405
Compensation of Stick-Slip Phenomenon in an Electrical Actuator
Abstract
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R. Merzouki, J. C. Cadiou, and N. K. M'Sirdi
: pp. 406-415
Study on Handling Clothes (Task Planning of Deformation for Unfolding Laundry)
Abstract
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Manabu Kaneko and Masayoshi Kakikura
: pp. 416-423
A Study of Active Cord Mechanisms -Basic Design of Pneumatically Driven Active Cord Mechanism-
Abstract
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Hidetaka Ohno and Shigeru Hirose
: pp. 424-431
A Study of Active Cord Mechanisms -Biomechanical Consideration on its 3D Gaits-
Abstract
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Hidetaka Ohno and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 432-441
Development of Output Coupling Mechanisms for Mechanical Systems
Abstract
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Rintaro Haraguchi, Koichi Osuka, and Toshiharu Sugie
: pp. 442-450
Development of Horse-type Quadruped Robot -Report 1, Development of Mechanism and Control System of Quadruped Robot PONY-
Abstract
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Shinobu Makita, and Junji Furusho
: pp. 451-457
Study of Individual Feature Extraction from Range Data of Human Nose
Abstract
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Akio Nozawa, and Hideto Ide
: pp. 458-468
Track Following Control for Large Capacity Flexible Disk Drives -Disturbance Observer Design using Two Position Sensors-
Abstract
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Jun Ueda, Akihiko Imagi, Hitoshi Tamayama, and Tsuneo Yoshikawa

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Robot Vision

Special Issue on Robot Vision

: p. 253
Robot Vision
Kazunori Umeda

Robot vision is an essential key technology in robotics and mechatronics. The number of studies on robot vision is wide-ranging, and this topic remains a hot vital target. This special issue reviews recent advances in this exciting field, following up two special issues, Vol. 11 No. 2, and Vol. 13 No. 6, which attracted more papers than expected. This indicates the high degree of research activity in this field. I am most pleased to report that this issue presents 12 excellent papers covering robot vision, including basic algorithms based on precise optical models, pattern and gesture recognition, and active vision. Several papers treat range imaging and others interesting applications to agriculture and quadruped robots and new devices. This issue also presents two news briefs, one on a practical range sensor suited to mobile robots and the other on vision devices that are the improved ones of famous IP-5000 series. I am convinced that this special issue helps research on robot vision more exciting. I would like to close by thanking all of the researchers who submitted their studies, and to give special thanks to the reviewers and editors, especially Prof. M. Kaneko, Dr. K. Yokoi, and Prof. Y. Nakauchi.

: pp. 254-262
High-Resolution Image Synthesis from Video Sequence by Light Field
Abstract
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Kenkichi Kobayashi, and Hideo Saito
: pp. 263-270
Virtual Object Overlay onto Uncalibrated Camera Image Sequence Enabling Tracking of Natural Features
Abstract
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Shunsuke Harasaki and Hideo Saito
: pp. 271-277
HMM-based Temporal Difference Learning with State Transition Updating for Tracking Human Communicational Behaviors
Abstract
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Minh Anh T. Ho, Yoji Yamada, and Yoji Umetani
: pp. 278-285
Pattern Recognition by Hierarchical Feature Extraction
Abstract
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Daigo Misaki, Shigeru Aomura, and Noriyuki Aoyama
: pp. 286-292
Hand Shape Recognition using Higher Order Local Autocorrelation Features in Log Polar Coordinate Space
Abstract
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Satoru Odo, and Kiyoshi Hoshino
: pp. 293-303
Position and Pose Estimation of Camera-Head with Foveated Wide Angle Lens
Abstract
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Haiquan Yang, Nobuyuki Kita, and Yasuyo Kita
: pp. 304-313
Camera Calibration and 3-D Measurement with an Active Stereo Vision System for Handling Moving Objects
Abstract
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Atsushi Yamashita, Toru Kaneko, Shinya Matsushita, Kenjiro T. Miura, and Suekichi Isogai
: pp. 314-321
Fast Distance Measurement Method by Parallel-Shift Arrangement Stereoscopic Camera
Abstract
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Taro Iwamoto, Koji Ohara, and Koji Shibuya
: pp. 322-330
A Range Finder System with Electronically Maskable Photo Detecting Device Array
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Jun Masaki, Nobuhiro Okada, and Eiji Kondo
: pp. 331-340
A Confocal Surface Measurement System Having Improved Measurement Accuracy for Rough Surfaces and Measurement Speed
Abstract
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Mitsuhiro Ishihara
: pp. 341-348
Robotic Vision for Bioproduction Systems
Abstract
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Mitsuji Monta, Naoshi Kondo, Seiichi Arima, and Kazuhiko Namba
: pp. 349-355
3D Visual Information Processing and Gait Control of a Quadruped Robot – for operation on a steep slope protected by a free frame –
Abstract
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Takahiro Doi, Hideyuki Tsukagoshi, and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 356-357
2-D distance image sensor
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Toshihiro Mori

No.2

(Apr)

Selected Papers from ROBOMEC'02

Selected Papers from ROBOMEC'02

: p. 113
Selected Papers from ROBOMEC’02
Md. Zulhash Uddin, Masashi Watanabe, Hirofusa Shirai, and Toshihiro Hirai

This special issue has been proposed in honor of the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics authorized to be the International Journal of the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers from 1999. The 2002 JSME Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’02) was held in Matsue on June 7-9, 2002, sponsored by the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and attended by 861 participants. The purpose of the conference was to aid future establishment of new industries by using advanced technologies of Robotics and Mechatronics. Technical sessions included 70 organized sessions in which 684 papers were presented. This special issue was organized by editing papers presented at ROBOMEC’02 to ensure that conference results reached the widest possible audience. The Conference Program Committee selected 40 papers -less than 6% of the total. We have included the 17 papers accepting an invitation for inclusion that were reviewed by journal referees and selected for publication in the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics Special Issue on Selected Papers from ROBOMEC’02 (Vol. 15, No. 2). We thank the authors who have contributed their updated papers, Editor-in-Chief Prof. Makoto Kaneko of Hiroshima University whose work has been indispensable in organizing this special issue, and the editors for selecting the papers.

: pp. 114-120
Method for Controlling Multi-DOF Ultrasonic Motor Using Neural Network
Abstract
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Kenjiro Takentura and Takashi Maeno
: pp. 121-127
Development of Haptic Device Using Flexible Sheet
Abstract
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Kenji Inoue, Reiko Uesugi, Tatsuo Arai, and Yasushi Mae
: pp. 128-135
Development of High-Power Micropump Using Inertia Effect of Fluid for Small-Sized Fluid Actuators
Abstract
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Takeshi Seto, Kunihiko Takagi, Kazuhiro Yoshida, Jung-Ho Park, and Shinichi Yokota
: pp. 136-142
An FPGA Implementation of Finite Physical Quantity Neural Network
Abstract
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Takashi Sotohebo, Minoru Watanabe, and Funtinori Kobayashi
: pp. 143-152
Behavior System Design and Implementation in Spined Musle-Tendon Humanoid “Kenta”
Abstract
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Tomoaki Yoshikai, Ikuo Mizuuchi, Daisuke Sato, Shigenori Yoshida, Masayuki Inaba, and Hirochika Inoue
: pp. 153-163
Measurement of Mechanical Characteristics of a Fingerpad Surface in the Design of a Tactile Display
Abstract
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Takeshi Homma, Shuichi Ino, Takashi Izumi, Hayato Kuroki, and Tohru Ifukube
: pp. 164-171
Development of Pneumatic Soft Robot Hand for Human Friendly Robot
Abstract
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Daisuke Sasaki, Toshiro Noritsugu, and Masahiro Takaiwa
: pp. 172-177
Fibrous Optical Actuator Containing Photochromic Molecules
Abstract
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Takayuki Tanaka, Naoto Yamagishi, Ryujiro Mitsui, and Takashi Kawamura
: pp. 178-184
Development on Conveyance Module with New Power Drive Mechanism for Thin Wire Production System
Abstract
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Hidenori Ishihara, Atsutoshi Ikeda, Minoru Suzuki, and Kimihito Yukawa
: pp. 185-191
A Novel Robot Vision Applicable to Real-time Target Tracking
Abstract
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Kazuhiro Shimonomura, Keisuke Inoue, Seiji Kameda, and Tetsuya Yagi
: pp. 192-199
Human Impedance Perception through Sensory-Motor Integration
Abstract
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Toshio Tsuji, Yoshiyuki Tanaka, Tatsuya Abe, and Hideki Miyaguchi
: pp. 200-207
Humanoid Arm Motion Planning Using Stereo Vision and RRT Search
Abstract
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Satoshi Kagami, James J. Kuffner, Koichi Nishiwaki, Kei Okada, Masayuki Inaba, and Hirochika Inoue
: pp. 208-218
Basic Circuit Design of a Neural Processor: Analog CMOS Implementation of Spiking Neurons and Dynamic Synapses
Abstract
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Yusuke Kanazawa, Tetsuya Asai, and Yoshihito Amemiya
: pp. 219-226
Wearable Haptic Interface Using ICPF Actuators for Tactile Feel Display in Response to Hand Movements
Abstract
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Masashi Konyo, Kazunobu Akazawa, Satoshi Tadokoro, and Toshi Takamori
: pp. 227-237
Evolutionary Motion Synthesis for a Modular Robot Using Genetic Algorithm
Abstract
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Eiichi Yoshida, Satoshi Murata, Akiya Kamimura, Kohji Tomita, Haruhisa Kurokawa, and Shigeru Kokaji
: pp. 238-243
Development of a Wall Moving In-Pipe Robot
Abstract
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Shingo Kobayashi and Kan Taguchi
: pp. 244-250
A Valve-Integrated Microactuator Using Homogeneous ER Fluid
Abstract
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Kazuhiro Yoshida, Hiroshi Yano, Jung-Ho Park, and Shinichi Yokota

No.1

(Feb)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: pp. 1-7
A Parallel Solution Scheme for Inverse Dynamics and its Application in Feed-forward Control of Link Mechanisms
Abstract
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Daigoro Isobe, Daisaku Imaizumi, Youichi Chikugo, and Shunsuke Sato
: pp. 8-14
Improvement in PZT Ceramic Vibrator Low Frequency Of Generated Sound for Using PZT Ceramic Vibrator As a Sound Source for an Artificial Larynx
Abstract
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Katsutoshi Ooe, Toshio Fukuda and Fumihito Arai
: pp. 15-23
Noise Cancellation Based on Split Spectra by Using Sound Location
Abstract
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Kazuyuki Nobu, Takeshi Koya, Kei-ichi Kaneda, Naomi Haratani and Hiromu Gotanda
: pp. 24-32
Viewing Tablet: A Pointing System Applicable to any Sheet Object
Abstract
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Hiroshi Usuda and Masanori Idesawa
: pp. 33-38
Quantitative Evaluation of the Tactile Sense by ERP
Abstract
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Tetsuya Shiozaki, Akio Nozawa, Yoshimi Nakazono, Masafumi Uchida, Hisaya Tanaka and Hideto Ide
: pp. 39-46
Development of a Hydraulic Force-Display (Application to One-DOF Master-Slave Control)
Abstract
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Hironao Yamada, Shigeki Kudomi, Yoshinori Niwa and Takayoshi Muto
: pp. 47-53
Sliding Mode Control of Hydraulic Power Shovel
Abstract
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Hironao Yamada, Kyoji Takeichi and Takayoshi Mato
: pp. 54-60
Master-Slave Control for Construction Robot Teleoperation
Abstract
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Hironao Yamada, Hidetoshi Kato, and Takayoshi Muto
: pp. 61-69
Development of “Souryu I & II” -Connected Crawler Vehicle for Inspection of Narrow and Winding Space
Abstract
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Toshio Takayama and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 70-76
Study on Articulated Mobile Robot Introduction and Experiment in Perspective Control
Abstract
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Akio Morishima and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 77-83
Stable Neural Network Controller Based Observer for Rigid Robot Manipulators
Abstract
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Boubaker Daâchi and Abdelaziz Benallegue
: pp. 84-95
A Study on the On-Ground Access System Using Marker-based Visual Imformation
Abstract
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Koichi Yoshida
: pp. 96-104
Generation of Observation Arrangement in Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems
Abstract
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Tomoyuki Kaga and Toshio Fukuda

Vol.14 (2002)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Assistive Device Technologies

Special Issue on Assistive Device Technologies

: p. 523
Assistive Device Technologies
Osamu Fukuda

Technologies for supporting a healthy lifestyle for the elderly and disabled are needed to keep them mentally and physically independent and to help them take part in society. The issue of a rapidly aging society has, in fact, become a major national problem. This special issue focuses on assistive device technologies for the elderly and disabled. Contributed and invited papers have been carefully reviewed by journal referees and 13 papers selected for publication in the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics Special Issue on Human Assistive Technologies (Vol. 14, No. 6). The first 4 papers, by Hashino, Yamada et al., Miyawaki et al., and Noritsugu et al., outline the development of new mobile equipment based on novel mobile mechanisms. The next 4 articles, authored by Wenwei et al., Ohga et al., Kato et al., and Hagihara et al., deal with prostheses and orthoses. In 2 more papers, by Homma et al. and Shinomiya et al., the focus is on rehabilitation and training equipment, while in the 11th article, Kanamori et al. report on the operating “feel” of a man-machine system to improve the maneuverability of the human interface. The last 2 papers, authored by Kobayashi et al. and Fukuda et al., detail an automatic diagnosis system based on biomedical information measured from the human body. We thank the authors who have so kindly contributed their papers to this special issue, and the reviewers who have made this publication possible. Our special thanks go to Editor-in-Chief Prof. Makoto Kaneko of Hiroshima University, who provided the opportunity for editing this issue. We expect this issue to help readers to better understand new trends in assistive device technologies and to further their interest in this most robust and innovative research field.

: pp. 524-530
Development of Stair-climbing Wheelchair
Abstract
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Satoshi Hashino
: pp. 531-537
Development of Crawler Stair Climber using Guide Rail
Abstract
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Yasuhiro Yamada, Yoshinori Segawa, Kazuhiro Ookoudo, Yoshiaki Komura, Akira Yamagishi, Tadashi Sekido, Kenichiro Ikeda and Shinichi Mita
: pp. 538-546
Evaluation of the Gait of Elderly People using an Assisting Cart (Gait on Slope)
Abstract
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Kazuto Miyawaki, Takehiro Iwami, Goro Obinata, Keiichi Kutsuzawa and Shinzo Nishimura
: pp. 547-556
Development of Medical Care Assist Bed using Pneumatic Planar Soft Actuator
Abstract
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Toshiro Noritsugu, Daisuke Sasaki, Seij i Matsuo, Ikuo Kusunoki and Yuuki Mitsumine
: pp. 557-564
Multifunctional Electrical Prosthetic Hand -Development of Tendon-driven Mechanism and Controller
Abstract
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Wenwei Yu, Daisuke Nishikawa, Yasuhiro Ishikawa, Hiroshi Yokoi and Yukinori Kakazu
: pp. 565-572
Development of A Five-finger Prosthetic Hand Using Ultrasonic Motors Controlled by Two EMG Signals
Abstract
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Makoto Ohga, Mikio Takeda, Akira Matsuba, Akira Koike and Toshio Tsuji
: pp. 573-580
Evaluation of Biosignal Processing Methods for Welfare Assisting Devices – Evaluation of EMG Information Extraction Processing Using Entropy
Abstract
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Ryu Katoh, Daisuke Nishikawa, Wenwei Yu, Hiroshi Yokoi and Yukinori Kakazu
: pp. 581-588
Direct Production for Prosthetic Sockets using Rapid Prototyping
Abstract
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Shigeru Hagihara, Shin'ichi Kasai, Masafumi Ishida, Seiji Shimizu, Kazuhiro Kijima and Katsuhiko Oshiba
: pp. 589-596
Development of Leg Rehabilitation Assistance
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Keiko Homma, Osamu Fukuda and Yoshihiko Nagata
: pp. 597-603
Development and Muscle Strength Training Evaluation for Horseback Riding Therapeutic Equipment
Abstract
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Youichi Shinomiya, Shuoyu Wang, Kenji Ishida and Tetsuhiko Kimura
: pp. 604-614
Operating Feeling Based Design in Human-robot Collaborative Control Systems
Abstract
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Naoki Kanamori and Kazuo Tanaka
: pp. 615-624
Development of Automated Diagnosis of Schizophrenia by Analyzing Facial Images
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Hiroshi Kobayashi, Kohki Kikuchi, Miyako Tazaki and Yoshibumi Nakane
: pp. 625-632
Modeling Heart Rate Variability with a HMM-based Neural Network
Abstract
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Osamu Fukuda, Yoshihiko Nagata, Keiko Homma and Toshio Tsuji
: pp. 633-639
Microtouch-Sensor Array Fabricated by Hydrothermal Method
Abstract
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Guiryong Kwon, Fumihito Arai, Toshio Fukuda, Kouichi ltoigawa and Yasunori Tsukahara

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Human Robot Interaction

Special Issue on Human Robot Interaction

: p. 431
Human Robot Interaction
Yasushi Nakauchi

Recent advances in robotics are disseminating robots into the social living environment as humanoids, pets, and caregivers. Novel human-robot interaction techniques and interfaces must be developed, however, to ensure that such robots interact as expected in daily life and work. Unlike conventional personal computers, such robots may assume a variety of configurations, such as industrial, wheel-based, ambulatory, remotely operated, autonomous, and wearable. They may also implement different communications modalities, including voice, video, haptics, and gestures. All of these aspects require that research on human-robot interaction become interdisciplinary, combining research from such fields as robotics, ergonomics, computer science and, psychology. In the field of computer science, new directions in human-computer interaction are emerging as post graphical user interfaces (GUIs). These include wearable, ubiquitous, and real-world computing. Such advances are thereby bridging the gap between robotics and computer science. The open-ended problems that potentially face include the following: What is the most desirable type of interaction between human beings and robots? What sort of technology will enable these interactions? How will human beings accept robots in their daily life and work? We are certain that readers of this special issue will be able to find many of the answers and become open to future directions concerning these problems. Any information that readers find herein will be a great pleasure to its editors.

: pp. 432-438
Cooperative Human-robot Handling of an Object with Motion Estimation
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Yusuke Maeda, Takayuki Hara and Tamio Arai
: pp. 439-452
An Interface between an Exoskeletal Elbow Motion Assistance Robot and the Human Upper Arm
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Kazuo Kiguchi, Shingo Kariya, Takakazu Bnaka, Keigo Watanabe and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 453-461
Vocalization Control of a Mechanical Vocal System under Auditory Feedback
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Yoshio Higashimoto and Hideyuki Sawada
: pp. 462-470
Robot Motion Algorithm Based on Interaction with Human
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Yoshikazu Mori, Koji Ota and Tatsuya Nakamura
: pp. 471-478
Development of Motion Data Description Language for Robots Based on eXtensible Markup Language – Realization of Better Understanding and Communication via Networks
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Ikuo Kitagishi, Tamotsu Machino, Akira Nakayama, Satoshi Iwaki and Masashi Okudaira
: pp. 479-489
Real-time Auditory and Visual Multiple-speaker Tracking For Human-robot Interaction
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Kazuhiro Nakadai, Ken-ichi Hidai, Hiroshi G. Okuno, Hiroshi Mizoguchi and Hiroaki Kitano
: pp. 490-496
Commitment-based Natural Language Interface System for Robots
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Yasushi Nakauchi, Takeshi Takahashi, Piyawat Naphattalung, Takashi Matsubara and Eiichi Kashiwagi
: pp. 497-505
Development of an Autonomous Humanoid Robot, iSHA, for Harmonized Human-Machine Environment
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Kenji Suzuki, Riku Hikiji and Shuji Hashimoto
: pp. 506-513
Manipulator Work System Using Gesture Instructions
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Noriyuki Kawarazaki, Nobuto Kashiwagi, Ichiro Hoya and Kazue Nishihara
: pp. 514-519
Subjective Evaluation for Maneuverability of a Robot Cooperating with Humans
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Ryojun Ikeura, Hikaru Inooka, and Kazuki Mizutani

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Modern Trends in Mobile Robotics

Special Issue on Modern Trends in Mobile Robotics

: p. 323
Modern Trends in Mobile Robotics
Takashi Tsubouchi and Keiji Nagatani

Since the dawning of the Robotics age, mobile robots have been important objectives of research and development. Working from such aspects as locomotion mechanisms, path and motion planning algorithms, navigation, map building and localization, and system architecture, researchers are working long and hard. Despite the fact that mobile robotics has a shorter history than conventional mechanical engineering, it has already accumulated a major, innovative, and rich body of R&D work. Rapid progress in modern scientific technology had advanced to where down-sized low-cost electronic devices, especially highperformance computers, can now be built into such mobile robots. Recent trends in ever higher performance and increased downsizing have enabled those working in the field of mobile robotics to make their models increasingly intelligent, versatile, and dexterous. The down-sized computer systems implemented in mobile robots must provide high-speed calculation for complicated motion planning, real-time image processing in image recognition, and sufficient memory for storing the huge amounts of data required for environment mapping. Given the swift progress in electronic devices, new trends are now emerging in mobile robotics. This special issue on “Modern Trends in Mobile Robotics” provides a diverse collection of distinguished papers on modern mobile robotics research. In the area of locomotion mechanisms, Huang et al. provide an informative paper on control of a 6-legged walking robot and Fujiwara et al. contribute progressive work on the development of a practical omnidirectional cart. Given the importance of vision systems enabling robots to survey their environments, Doi et al., Tang et al., and Shimizu present papers on cutting-edge vision-based navigation. On the crucial subject of how to equip robots with intelligence, Hashimoto et al. present the latest on sensor fault detection in dead-reckoning, Miura et al. detail the probabilistic modeling of obstacle motion during mobile robot navigation, Hada et al. treat long-term mobile robot activity, and Lee et al. explore mobile robot control in intelligent space. As guest editors, we are sure readers will find these articles both informative and interesting concerning current issues and new perspectives in modern trends in mobile robotics.

: pp. 324-332
Neuro-Based Position and Force Hybrid Control of Six-Legged Walking Robot
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Qing-jiu Huang and Kenzo Nonami
: pp. 333-341
Omnidirectional Cart with Power-assist System
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Shigeki Fujiwara, Hitoshi Kitano, Hideki Yamashita, Hiroshi Maeda and Hideo Fukunaga
: pp. 342-348
Sensor Fault Detection and Diagnosis in Dead Reckoning System of Mobile Robot: Interacting Multiple-Model Approach
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Masafumi Hashimoto, Hiroyuki Kawashima and Fuminori Oba
: pp. 349-356
Probabilistic Uncertainty Modeling of Obstacle Motion for Robot Motion Planning
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Jun Miura and Yoshiaki Shirai
: pp. 357-365
Study of Shape Representation Using Internal Radiated-light Projection
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Takahiro Doi and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 366-374
Mobile Robot Playback Navigation Based on Robot Pose Calculation Using Memorized Omnidirectional Images
Abstract
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Lixin Tang and Shin'ichi Yuta
: pp. 375-381
The Second Stage Experiments on Long Term Activity of Autonomous Mobile Robots – Repetitive Navigation for One Week in a Corridor
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Yasushi Hada and Shin'ichi Yuta
: pp. 382-389
Multi-Functional Application of Wide-Angle Foveated Vision Sensor in Mobile Robot Navigation
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Sohta Shimizu
: pp. 390-399
Mobile Robot Control in Intelligent Space for People Support
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Joo-Ho Lee, Kazuyuki Morioka and Hideki Hashimoto
: pp. 400-407
Low Cost Pipe-crawling Pneumatic Robot
Abstract
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Andrea Manuello Bertetto and Maurizio Ruggiu
: pp. 408-419
Implementing Fuzzy Learning Algorithms in a 6 DOF Hydraulic Parallel Link Manipulator: Actuators’ Fuzzy Modeling
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Zakarya Zyada, Yasuhisa Hasegawa, Gancho Vachkov and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 420-428
An Evaluation of Sliding Mode Control for Vehicle Suspensions
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Ismail Yuksek, Nurkan Yagiz and Selim Sivrioglu

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on From Microrobotics to Nanorobotics

Special Issue on From Microrobotics to Nanorobotics

: p. 211
From Microrobotics to Nanorobotics
Fumihito Arai

Micro/nanotechnologies are keys crucial to improving system performance. This is why it is so important to research theory and applications based on analysis and synthesis from the micro- to the nanotechnology engineering level. Micro/nanorobotics are extremely important to the future of robotics and automation. Micro/nanotechnologies will certainly be applied in fields such as material science, industry, medicine, bioengineering, and services. Research on micro/nanoscale manipulation has thus attracted special attention in the robotics and mechatronics communities in the last decade. This special issue features selected papers focusing on cutting-edge topics and innovative applications based on new approaches in the fields of micro/nanorobotics. These papers were chosen from the 2001 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2001) and important domestic conferences such as the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers(JSME) Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC). I would like, in closing this short introduction, to express my particular gratitude to the authors, who have updated their papers for this special issue, and to thank all of the contributors and reviewers who have made this vital publication possible. I also would like to thank Editor-in-Chief Prof. Makoto Kaneko of Hiroshima University, who provided the opportunity for editing this issue. I hope the papers contained herein will prove both interesting and useful to readers wanting to learn about the latest advances in micro/nanorobotics.

: pp. 212-220
Force Control System for Autonomous Micro Manipulation
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Tamio Tanikawa, Masashi Kawai, Noriho Koyachi, Tatsuo Arai, Takayuki Ide, Shinji Kaneko, Ryo Ohta and Takeshi Hirose
: pp. 221-226
Micromanipulation by Miniature Robots in a SEM Vacuum Chamber
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Ohmi Fuchiwaki and Hisayuki Aoyama
: pp. 227-237
Micro-object Pick and Place Operation under SEM based on Micro-physics
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Shigeki Saito, Hideki T. Miyazaki, and Tomomasa Sato
: pp. 238-244
Positional Recognition and Attitude Control for 3-D Biomicromanipulation in Microscopy
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Akiko Kawaji, Fumihito Arai and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 245-252
Three-dimensional Nanorobotic Manipulations of Carbon Nanotubes
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Lixin Dong, Fumihito Arai and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 253-261
Control of Elasticity and Trajectory of Robot Arm with Redundant Actuators
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Toru Oshima, Tomohiko Fujikawa and Minayori Kumamoto
: pp. 262-269
Actuator Arrangement and Motion Form of Vertebrate Leg
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Toru Oshima Tomohiko Fujikawa and Mina on Kumamoto
: pp. 270-277
Coordination Control of Arm Using Antagonistic Actuators
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Toru Oshima, Tomohiko Fujikawa and Minayori Kumamoto
: pp. 278-289
Enhancing the Autonomy of Teleoperated Redundant Manipulators Through Fusion of Intelligent Control Modules
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D. P. Thrishantha Nanayakkara, Kazuo Kiguchi, Tsukasa Murakami, Keigo Watanabe and Kiyotaka Izumi
: pp. 290-297
SMA-Net: A Deformable Morphology Robot Using Shape Memory Alloy
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Takashi Nagai, Hiroshi Yokoi and Yukinori Kakazu
: pp. 298-303
The Development of a Stair-climbing Robot with Wavy Movement by Rotating Crosses
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Ato Kitagawa, Liang Zhang, Takashi Eguchi and Hideyuki Tsukagushi
: pp. 304-312
A Study of Feasibility for a Novel Parallel-serial Manipulator
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Marco Ceccarelli, Erika Ottaviano and Giuseppe Carbone
: pp. 313-317
Qualitative Evaluation by ERP for vibration Discrimination
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Tetsuya Shiozaki, Hisaya Tanaka, Akio Nozawa, Hideto Ide and Masafumi Uchida

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on Selected Papers from ROBOMEC'01

Special Issue on Selected Papers from ROBOMEC'01

: p. 97
Selected Papers from ROBOMEC’01
Kazuhito Yokoi and Tatsuo Arai

This special issue has been proposed in honor of the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics authorized as the International Journal of the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers from 1999. The 2001 JSME Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’01) was held in Takamatsu, June 8-10, 2001, sponsored by the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. Its purpose was to aid establishments of new industries by using advanced technologies of Robotics and Mechatronics. In technical sessions, 82 organized sessions were held and 624 papers presented. More than 800 participants attended the conference. This special issue has been organized by editing papers presented at ROBOMEC’01 to disseminate the significant results of the conference. Papers from the conference were invited and reviewed by journal referees. Sixteen were selected for publication in the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics Special Issue on Selected Papers from ROBOMEC’01 (Vol. 14, No. 2). We thank the authors in this special issue who have contributed their updated papers. We also thank Editor-in-Chief Makoto Kaneko of Hiroshima University, whose work has been indispensable in organizing this special issue. We also thank the Editors for selecting papers.

: pp. 98-104
Presentation of Realistic Motion to the Operator in Operating a Tele-operated Construction Robot
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Dingxuan Zhao, Yupeng Xia, Hironao Yamada and Takayoshi Muto
: pp. 105-111
Omnidirectional Mobile Platform for Research and Development
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Kuniaki Kawabata, Tsuyoshi Suzuki, Hayato Kaetsu and Hajime Asama
: pp. 112-117
Development of a Compact Autonomous Underwater vehicle Using Varivec Propeller
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Yutaka Nagashima, Nobuyoshi Taguchi, Takakazu Ishimatsu and Hirofumi Inoue
: pp. 118-123
Creeping and Novel Huge Bending of Plasticized PVC
Abstract
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Md. Zulhash Uddin, Masashi Watanabe, Hirofusa Shirai, and Toshihiro Hirai
: pp. 124-132
A Service Robot Acting by Occasional Dialog – Object Recognition Using Dialog with User and Sensor-Based Manipulation –
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Yasushi Makihara, Masao Takizawa, Kazuo Ninokata, Yoshiaki Shirai, Jun Miura, and Nobutaka Shimada
: pp. 133-139
Separation of Target Microbe by Laser Manipulation and Flow Control
Abstract
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Fumihito Arai, Akihiko Ichikawa, Toshio Fukuda, Koji Horio, Kouichi Itoigawa and Keisuke Morishima
: pp. 140-146
Artificial Finger Skin having Ridges and Distributed Tactile Sensors used for Grasp Force Control
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Daisuke Yamada, Takashi Maeno and Yoji Yamada
: pp. 147-156
Recognizing Moving Obstacles for Robot Navigation using Real-time Omnidirectional Stereo Vision
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Hiroshi Koyasu, Jun Miura, and Yoshiaki Shirai
: pp. 157-161
Exploration of Underwater Volcano Teisi by Autonomous Underwater Vehicle “R-One Robot”
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Kenji Nagahashi, Takashi Obara and Tamaki Ura
: pp. 162-169
Application of Neural Network to Teaching of Massage using Multi-fingered Robot Hand
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Hideo Kitagawa, Tomomi Terai, Panya Minyong and Kazuhiko. Terashima
: pp. 170-176
Error Analysis of Multilegged Robots for Dead Reckoning
Abstract
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Yasushi Mae, Tatsuo Arai and Kenji Inoue
: pp. 177-185
Motion Generation for a Modular Robot
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Eiichi Yoshida, Satoshi Murata, Akiya Kamimura, Kohji Tomita, Haruhisa Kurokawa, and Shigeru Kokaji
: pp. 186-192
Development of Holonomic Omnidirectional Vehicle “Vuton-II” with Omni-Discs
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Riichiro Damoto and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 193-198
Simple Compound-Eye-Type Micro Vision Sensor and Its Application for Detecting Motion
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Kazunori Umeda and Michiaki Sekine
: pp. 199-202
A Simple 3D Image Display Using Active Perception
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Yasuo Hayashibara
: pp. 203-209
Vision System for Micromanipulation
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Yousuke Katoh, Tatsuo Arai, Kenji Inoue, Yasushi Mae and Tamio Tanikawa

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Toward Establishment of Entertainment and Amusement Machine Technology

Special Issue on Toward Establishment of Entertainment and Amusement Machine Technology

: pp. 1-2
Toward Establishment of Entertainment and Amusement Machine Technology
Shigeki Suganoand Takanori Shibata

Advances in society have enriched lifestyles, making them more comfortable and increasing spare time. People spend more time and money on entertainment ‘and amusement, purchasing more than basic necessities and spending time at recreational facilities. Devices used in entertainment and amusement frequently interact with people, making it important to design them emphasizing subjective evaluations by people who interact with them rather than objective evaluations such as speed and accuracy. This makes technologies on entertainment and amusement interdisciplinary, going beyond the scope of conventional engineering with consideration of human sensitivities. Sugeno describes this interdisciplinary technology and discusses its possibilities in “Engineering and Amusement.” This special edition presents information on Japanese mechatronics technologies for entertainment and amusement to overseas people. Included are papers on scholarly- and technologically-de novo research and developments and technologies already put into practical use as commercially available products. Devices for entertainment and amusement must interact with people in different ways, and as such, they take a wide variety of shapes and have a broad array of controllers to suitably accommodate different human needs. It is therefore of critical importance to give special consideration to human sensitivity, which makes this area of engineering difficult to standardize and generalize. It is, however, becoming increasingly important in different fields of engineering to take interaction between machinery and people into consideration. This special edition provides perspectives and technologies that hold clues for the field of entertainment and amusement and also for many other areas of research and development. Kuroki et al. discuss the structure and the control architecture of SDR-X, a humanoid robot developed for entertainment, and detail the dancing performance of this robot in “A Small Biped Entertainment Robot.” Shibata et al. statistically analyze the findings of subjective evaluation of the Mental Commit Robot Paro, a robot shaped like a baby seal developed to provide positive psychological effects such as pleasure and comfort to people through interaction, and considers the results in “Subjective Evaluation of Seal Robot Paro.” Mitsui et al. tell about the results of physiological experiments and subjective evaluations of psychophysiological effects of interactions with a seal-shaped Mental Commit Robot on people in “Psycho-physiological Effects by Interaction with Mental Commit Robot.” Nakata et al., in “Analysis of Impression of Robot Bodily Expression,” suggest a method for setting up physical characteristics of movements based on the theory of Laban in Choreologia as a way of quantitatively evaluating impressions of movement of a robot a person gets during interaction, and discuss the method’s effectiveness. Tanaka et al., in “Principle of Stable Running of A Unicycle Robot,” describe the research and development of a unicycle robot modeled after the movement of a person riding a unicycle. They analyzed the mechanism of complex and skillful movements to have the robot make comical human-like movements. These findings could be applied to controlling robots in general. Kobayashi et al., in “A New Concept of the Robotic Technology Applicable to Human Physical Support,” describe a muscle suit to support human muscles with the help of air tube actuators. Because this suit enables people to move about naturally, its technology is applicable as component technology for new types of entertainment. Yamamoto et al., in “Conversation with a Communication Robot Named Wonder – for the Mental Support of the Elderly Living Alone,” discuss results of a validation experiment for a robot developed with several objectives, including the ‘reduction of the psychological burden on elderly people who live alone and applications as a pet and/or a speech partner and as an interface for outside communication through CATV to make their daily life safer. Fuj ita, in “Personal Robot PaPeRo,” tells about the objective of the development, design, function, and structure of the autonomous robot PaPeRo developed for communication with people in private households and reports the results of an experiment in which 12 families lived together with the robot for about 2 months. Miyake et al., in “Interactive Simulation Ride System,” present a simulation system with a high degree of virtual sense capability being achieved by a 3-6 mensional audiovisual perception data display using virtual reality technology and a ride system with 4 degrees of freedom. This system is already being used in amusement facilities and museums. Haga, in “WonderBorg and BN-l,” describes the concept of development, system structure, and control of an insect-shaped robot “WonderBorg” and a cat-like robot BN-I developed with the objective of offering interactive entertainment to people through assembling and programming robot. Nagasu, in “Dream Force O1,” tells about the concept of development and the structure of Dream Force 01, a bipedal locomotion robot that can be operated by the user for pleasure with the help of a robot controller. Omshi, in “POO-CHI,” discusses the design and the function of a dog-shaped robot toy POO-CHI that has become a hot seller all over the world. We thanks Japan Toy Culture Foundation on supports for preparation of developments reports.

Regular Papers

: pp. 3-5
Engineering and Amusement
Abstract
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Shigeki Sugano
: pp. 6-12
A Small Biped Entertainment Robot
Abstract
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Yoshihiro Kuroki, Tatsuzo Ishida, Jin-ichi Yamaguchi, Masahiro Fujita and Toshi T. Doi
: pp. 13-19
Subjective Evaluation of Seal Robot: Paro -Tabulation and Analysis of Questionnaire Results
Abstract
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Takanori Shibata, Teruaki Mitsui Kazuyoshi Wada and Kazuo Tanie
: pp. 20-26
Psychophysiological Effects by Interaction with Mental Commit Robot
Abstract
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Teruaki Mitsui, Takanori Shibata, Kazuyoshi Wada and Kazuo Tanie
: pp. 27-36
Analysis of Impression of Robot Bodily Expression
Abstract
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Toru Nakata, Taketoshi Mori and Tomomasa Sato
: pp. 37-45
Principle of Stable Running of an Unicycle Robot
Abstract
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Takayuki Tanaka, Hisanobu Suzuki and Kazuo Tanaka
: pp. 46-53
New Robot Technology Concept Applicable to Human Physical Support – The Concept and Possibility of the Muscle Suit (Wearable Muscular Support Apparatus) –
Abstract
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Hiroshi Kobayashi, Taisuke Matsushita, Yusuke Ishida, and Kohki Kikuchi
: pp. 54-59
A Spoken Dialogue robot, Named Wonder, to Aid Senior Citizens Who living Alone with Communication
Abstract
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Hiroshi Yamamoto, Hiroyuki Miyazaki, Takashi Tsuzuki and Yoshihiro Kojima
: pp. 60-63
Personal Robot PaPeRo
Abstract
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Yoshiro Fujita
: pp. 64-67
Interactive Simulation Ride
Abstract
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Norihisa Miyake, Tsukasa Shiina, Masayuki Oshiro, and Yuji Matsuda
: pp. 68-72
WonderBorg and BN-1
Abstract
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Yoshinori Haga
: pp. 73-75
Dream Force 01
Abstract
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Hiroyuki Nagasu
: pp. 76-77
POO–CHI
Abstract
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Tomohiko Onishi
: pp. 78-87
CATRASYS (Cassino Tracking System): A Wire System for Experimental Evaluation of Robot Workspace
Abstract
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Erika Ottaviano, Marco Ceccarelli, Maria Toti and Carolina Avila Carrasco
: pp. 88-95
Distributed Learning Agents with Motivation for Cellular Warehouse Problem
Abstract
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Katsumi Hama, Sadayoshi Mikami, Keiji Suzuki, and Yukinori Kakazu

Vol.13 (2001)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Vision and Mechatronics

Special Issue on Vision and Mechatronics

: pp. 567-568
Vision and Mechatronics
Masanori Idesawa

The amount of information human beings obtain from the external world through their visual senses exceeds 80% of the total amount of information they take in. Robots and similar automatons must thus be provided with visual functions equivalent to those of human beings, enabling them to grasp external conditions accurately and to move appropriately based on such conditions. Computer and machine vision systems technologically and practically realize such visual functions, and studies of these vision systems have drawn attention and research since the 1970s. Studies on the human and other biological visual systems have progressed steadily under the stimulus of rapid advances in the brai sciences field. Such studies have brought to light new types of useful information related to biological vision systems and such information has been used to promote studies of artificial visual senses. In separate developments based on the progress of integrated circuit systems, visual sensors imitating the sensing of the human retina and the eyes of insects and animals have been developed and efforts made to apply such sensors to a variety of control systems. Human beings fuse information obtained through the visual and other senses with information collected by interacting positively with the external world to form in the brain necessary images (models) related to the external world. Based on such images and models, human beings make decisions and plan for appropriate action to take under specific circumstances. In such cases, the human senses, including the visual sense, interact mutually rather than independently. When a visual stimulus differing from ordinary stimuli is perceived, the effect of such a stimulus is recognized both by the sensory organs and sometimes by the motor organs. Human beings fuse information obtained through the visual and other senses with information collected by interacting positively with the external world to form in the brain necessary images (models) related to the external world. Based on such images and models, human beings make decisions and plan for appropriate action to take under specific circumstances. In such cases, the human senses, including the visual sense, interact mutually rather than independently. When a visual stimulus differing from ordinary stimuli is perceived, the effect of such a stimulus is recognized both by the sensory organs and sometimes by the motor organs. In the present natural environment, where numerous conditions artificially produced by numerous automation and visual systems are present simultaneously, it becomes important to study the interference and interaction among the sensory, motor, and physiological organs. The human visual function gradually develops with maturation and declines with age, following a downward curve with the years. Simple deviations in the focusing range due to myopia or hyperopia can be corrected almost completely using ordinary glasses for near-sightedness or far-sightedness. Stenosis in the focusing range, however, caused by aging and a decline in the elasticity of the eye lens cannot be corrected by the use of ordinary glasses. Such correction requires either the use of 2 types of glasses, i.e., those for near-sightedness and those for far-sightedness, alternately depending on the distance between the glasses user and the object viewed. Bifocals may also be used. The use of double lenses, however, may cause problems for the user, who must change from one pair of glasses to the other and vice versa. Biofocal lenses present problems related to the need to shift the gaze unnaturally, the presence of an unnaturally deformed whole-vision field, and the undesirable occurrence of sensations such as nausea required in attempts to adjust to changed visual fields. Take the case of fine soldering work at very close range and parts handling done at a medium range simultaneously, for example. This presents both far-sighted and near-sighted personnel with difficulties in the use of glasses. Symptoms of hyperopia generally begin to appear in those aged 40 to 45 years old. With society rapidly aging and the number of children – successors to the aging – the working population is also aging, making it vital from a social viewpoint to mechatronically solve the many problems related to hyperopia and other vision-related developments. It is with great pleasure that we present a number of articles in this special edition that should prove both informative and interesting to researchers in the fields of robotic engineering and mechatronics. These articles offer new insights into studies on welfare and human engineering and are sure to make important contributions to the progress of related R&D.

: pp. 569-574
Information Processing in Visual System – Optical Illusion and Visual Mechanism
Abstract
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Masanori Idesawa
: pp. 575-580
Design of Automatic Focusing Glasses for Presbyopia
Abstract
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Toyomi Fujita, Makoto Hagiwara and Masanori Idesawa
: pp. 581-587
A Study on the Development of Accommodation-Assistance Glasses
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Syu Sato Toyomi Fujita and Masanori Idesawa
: pp. 588-593
Rotational Dynamic Illusion Related to Physiological Influence in Virtual Environments
Abstract
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Toyomi Fujita and Masanori Idesawa
: pp. 594-600
Role of Visual Feedback in Upright Posture Control
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Takanobu Nagata, Akimasa Ishida, Yutaka Fukuoka, Haruyuki Minamitani
: pp. 601-613
Visuo-Motor Adaptation to Stepwise and Gradual Changes in the Environment: Relationship between Consciousness and Adaptation
Abstract
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Yutaka Sakaguchi, Yu-ichi Akashi and Mitsuo Takano
: pp. 614-620
A Novel Robot Vision Employing a Silicon Retina
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Kazuhiro Shimonomura, Seiji Kameda, Kazuo Ishii and Tetsuya Yagi
: pp. 621-624
Flying Robot with Biologically Inspired Vision
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Michinori Ichikawa, Hitoshi Yamada and Johane Takeuchi
: pp. 625-636
Self-Partitioning State Space for Behavior Acquisition of Vision-Based Mobile Robots
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Takayuki Nakamura and Tsukasa Ogasawara
: pp. 637-642
A Study on a New Type of Stereogram Using Binocularly Unpaired Wedge-Shaped Surfaces
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Kouji Sudoh and Masanori Idesawa
: pp. 643-650
Studies on Uncertainty Evaluation in Straightness Measurement
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Sanjay Yadav, Jiro Matsuda and Lalith Prasantha Liyanawadu Chitarage
: pp. 651-658
Stitching of 3-D Image Position Measurement System with 1-D Direction-sensitive Devices
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Saied Mohamed, Toyomi Fujita and Masanori Idesawa

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Recent Advances in Robot Control

Special Issue on Recent Advances in Robot Control

: p. 449
Recent Advances in Robot Control
Haruhisa Kawasaki

This special issue contains outstanding papers on robot control presented at international meetings in Japan in 2000. Featured topics include face robots, polishing robots, control for multifingered robotic hands, re configurable brachiating space robots, DD parallel robots, and robot control technologies such as a distributed robust motion controller, image-based visual servoing, fault adaptive kinematic control, and optimum control for a robot manipulator. We also will have a variety of topics such as shaft insert tasks in the robot task field, fingerprint image sensing in sensing technologies, compliance display, emergence of affective behavior, human/robot communication in interfaces, and workspace analysis of parallel manipulators in robot analysis. In preparing this special issue, we have asked authors to revise work presented at international meetings to include further analyses and experimental data to help make papers even more interesting and informative concerning the purposes of the study, analyses, experiments, and simulation. We thank Professor Kohei Ohnishi, Department of System Design Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Keio University, for his complete, courteous assistance, and all of the authors who such unstinting time to update their papers for this special issue.

: pp. 450-457
Shaft Insertion for Moving Object Using Robot Manipulator with Cross PSD and Vibration End-effector
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Soichiro Hayakawa and Nuio Tsuchida
: pp. 458-463
Fingerprint Image Sensing Using Micromechanical Key and Extraction Algorithm for Sensed Fingerprint Image
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Fumihito Arai and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 464-471
Distributed Robust Motion Controller for Redundant Manipulator Using Disturbance Observer
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Naoki Oda
: pp. 472-478
Development of Pneumatic Human Interface and its Application to Compliance Display
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Masahiro Takaiwa and Toshiro Noritsugu
: pp. 479-487
Image-based Visual Servoing for Optimal Grasping
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Hideo Fujimoto, Liu-Cun Zhu and Karim Abdel-Malek
: pp. 488-496
Workspace Analysis of Parallel Manipulator for Telemicromanipulation Systems
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Noriaki Ando, Masahiro Ohta, Kohei Gonda and Hideki Hashimoto
: pp. 497-504
Study on Face Robot Platform as a KANSEI Medium
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Hiroshi Kobayashi
: pp. 505-516
Emergence of Affective Behaviors through Physical Interaction between Human and Mental Commit Robot
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Takanori Shibata and Kazuo Tanie
: pp. 517-525
Polishing Robot Using Joystick Controlled Teaching
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Fusaomi Nagata, Keigo Watanabe, Satoshi Hashino, Hiroyuki Tanaka, Takuro Matsuyama and Kenji Hara
: pp. 526-532
A Control for Multi-Fingered Robotic Hand with Distributed Touch Sensor
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Hajime Sugiuchi, Yuki Hasegawa, Shinichiro Watanabe and Masashi Nomoto
: pp. 533-539
Spatial Generalization of Optimal Control for Robot Manipulators
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Zhiwei Luo, Hideyuki Ando, Shigeyuki Hosoe, Keiji Watanabe and Atsuo Kato
: pp. 540-547
Fault Adaptive Kinematic Control Using Multiprocessor System and its Verification Using a Hyper-redundant Manipulator
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Shinichi Kimura, Shigeru Tsuchiya, Tomoki Takagi and Shinichiro Nishida
: pp. 548-553
Experimental Evaluation of Reconfigurable Brachiating Space Robot
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Ryoichi Hayashi, Saburo Matunaga and Yoshiaki Ohkarni
: pp. 554-560
Realization of Fast and Dexterous Tasks by a DD Parallel Robot Using Motor Back-drivability
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Doohyung Kim and Masaru Uchiyama

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Fundamental Technologies for ITS

Special Issue on Fundamental Technologies for ITS

: p. 339
Fundamental Technologies for ITS
Sadayuki Tsugawa

Intelligent transport systems (ITS), a combination of IT(Information Technology) and TS (Transport Systems), solves problems such as accidents and congestion, lessening environmental impact and conserving energy. As conventional solutions to traffic issues became less and less effective, high-tech solutions have been sought. Preceding the term ITS, coined in 1994, were road transport informatics (RTI), advanced transport telematics (AT), and intelligent vehicle-highway systems (IVHS). In the mid-1980s, large ITS projects started in Europe, the US, and Japan, but the use of high-tech solutions emerged in the 1950s. As indicated above, ITS includes systems covering passenger-car safety and freight management, supported by a wide range of technologies including sensing, control, communications, and human factors. This special issue on ITS focuses on ITS technologies that share similarities with robotics and mechatronics. The papers in this issue are classed into sensing, control, simulation, and electric vehicles. Papers in sensing deal with the application of vehicle localization in automated driving, 3-dimensional localization with corner cubes and laser radar, vision-based passage detection, and night-time obstacle detection with machine vision. The technology presented in these papers is expected to play an important role in robotics and mechatronics. The 4 control papers include an overview on control algorithms for automated driving and 3 papers on control algorithms for lateral control, lane changing, and parking assistance. The major difference between mobile robots and automobiles is that, due to speed, the behavior of mobile robots can be described with kinematics, but that of automobiles must be described with dynamics. Nevertheless, control algorithms for automated automobiles are insightful in robotics. Simulation technologies are essential in ITS to present virtually situations difficult or not possible to realize in the real world. One paper deals with a driving simulator and the other with automobile traffic. The last area in this ITS issue is electric vehicles. Their handicaps can be overcome by ITS, leading to new road transport. The paper on electric vehicles introduces an experimental electric vehicle both educational and informative to readers planning electric vehicles to conduct experiments involving ITS. We thank those on the JSME Research Committee 179 for cooperation between human and systems in ITS for reviewing submitted papers.

: pp. 340-351
Experimental Study on Application of DGPS-based Position Information to Automatic Driving Control
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Manabu Omae and Takehiko Fujioka
: pp. 352-356
3-D Position Measurement System for Autonomous vehicles Using Laser Fan Beam Scanners
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Nobuo Komatsu and Toshihiro Tsumura
: pp. 357-370
Real-time Corridor Recognition for Autonomous Vehicle
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Mamoru Minami, Julien Agbanhan, Hidekazu Suzuki and Toshiyuki Asakura
: pp. 371-380
Obstacle Recognition and Position Measurement for Night Driving by Image Processing
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Atsushi Wakamiya, Naoki Suganuma, In Soo Kweon and Naofumi Fujiwara
: pp. 381-386
An Overview on Control Algorithms for Automated Highway Systems
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Sadayuki Tsugawa
: pp. 387-394
Construction of Control Algorithm for an Autonomous Vehicle
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Hyung-Eun Im, Ichiro Kageyama and Yoshiyuki Nozaki
: pp. 395-401
Automated Lane Change Control of Vision-Based Vehicle
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Shin Kato and Sadayuki Tsugawa
: pp. 402-408
Development of Advanced Parking Assistance System in the iCAN Framework
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Massaki Wada, Kang Sup Yoon, and Hideki Hashimoto
: pp. 409-418
Development of Hi-Fidelity Driving Simulator for Measuring Driving Behavior
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Motoyuki Akamatsu, Masayuki Okuwa and Masaaki Onuki
: pp. 419-425
Traffic Flow Simulator by Multiagent
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Hitoshi Tsunashima, Yasukazu Nishi, Takashi Honjyo, Hiroyuki Kaku and Takuji Sakai
: pp. 426-431
Design and Manufacture of Small-Sized Electric Vehicles for Mechanical Engineering Education
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Haruo Sakamoto
: pp. 432-437
Development and Evaluation of One-Shaft Type ER Clutch
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Norihiko Saga, Taro Nakamura and Masaru Nakazawa
: pp. 438-444
Estimation of Pleasantness and Arousal Level Using Thermogram
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Hisaya Tanaka, Hideto Ide, and Yuji Nagashima

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Flexible Force Control and Process-Adaptive Production Systems

Special Issue on Flexible Force Control and Process-Adaptive Production Systems

: p. 221
Flexible Force Control and Process-Adaptive Production Systems
Shigeyuki Kawaji

In the recent assembly lines, the frequency of changing processes has been increasing in line with high mix production, but because these changes are carried out by operator, the burden of changing processes has increased as well. This situation has arisen because of the fact that since the robots being used at present automatic assembly lines are based on a simple teaching and playing back method, human workers must renew instructions for each act of changing a work object and also that dedicated machines are necessary due to the inability of making precision assembly,thereby inviting declines in total operational rates and increases in cost. These facts are limiting the use of robot based automation itself and are one of the important factors for the declining international competitive power. Under these circumstances, with the aim of constructing sophisticated production systems that are capable of dealing with process changes automatically without the use of human labor, a project called “Research & Development of Process Adaptive Flexible Robots”was proposed and was adopted to the Regional Consortium Research and Development Enterprise supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, and was adopted. The research period was to be 3 years from the fiscal year 1997 to the fiscal year 1999, and the total research fund was to be 360 million yen. In more specific terms, an engine assembly line and a semiconductor testing process were chosen as research subjects; and developmental research was carried out for elemental techniques that are necessary for the flexible execution of tasks such as piston insertion causing no damage to walls even with a minute clearance, or IC chip insertion causing no plastic deformation even with positional dislocation, though these tasks must be carried out when works change in type, size, etc.; and the researchers started the work of developing system integration technology that would achieve these task objectives in the optimal manner. Attention was focused rather on “force control” of which humans make skillful use than on developmental work based on the conventional position control technology, and development objectives were set not only to achieve a breakthrough for putting force control technology into practice by way of the integration of flexible force control and high aprecision position control and also by way of controlling the vibrations of complex machine systems, but also to demonstrate the research results by means of two prototypes of a flexible robot for assembly lines and an inserter for IC chip testing. The present special issue is a collection of results achieved by the participating research organization in the present research and development work, and it will be a great pleasure for its editors if this issue contribute seven a little. toward the future practical use of force control. Finally, sincere appreciation is expressed to the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization for providing an opportunity for carrying out this research and development work, as well as to all the organizations for their participation in the project.

: pp. 222-229
Sensorless Force Control for High-speed Pressurization
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Shigeyasu Kawaji, Fuminori Ozaki and Ryutaro Higashi
: pp. 230-237
Development of User-friendly Tuning for Impedance Control Parameters
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Junji shimamura and Masaki Arao
: pp. 238-244
Configuration and Optimal Control of Hydraulic/Pneumatic Hybrid Actuator with 2-DOF
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Atsushi Ohtomo and Yasuharu Sasaki
: pp. 245-253
Structural Analysis of a Universal Holding Mechanism for Piston Rings
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Takao Higashimachi, Takahide Nakayama, Takenori Hirakawa and Hisato Sasahara
: pp. 254-266
Sensor-Based Artificial Skills with Force and Vision Information
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Kosei Kitagaki, Takashi Suehiro and Motoyoshi Fujiwara
: pp. 267-272
Force Sensing Unit with Single Amplifier and an Application to a Whisker Sensor
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Naohiro Ueno and Makoto Kaneko
: pp. 273-281
Realization of Controllers for Manipulation of Deformable Objects Based on Hybrid Automaton and Human Skill
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Kazuaki Hirana, Tatsuya Suzuki, Shigeru Okuma, Kaiji Itabashi and Fumiharu Fujiwara
: pp. 282-288
Automatic Startup Operation of Plastics Extruder by Flexible Intelligence Machine Control
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Masaki Arao, Junichi Kawano, Mamoru Egi and Masaharu Osumi
: pp. 289-293
Development of Flexible Inserter for IC Chip Testing
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Toshihiro Taguchi
: pp. 294-298
A Fixture-Free Piston-Stuffing Machine for Flexible Assembly Lines
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Takahide Nakayama, Takeshi Mitsunaga, Takenori Hirakawa and Syunji Tanaka
: pp. 299-313
A Historical Perspective of Robotics Toward the Future
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Marco Ceccarelli
: pp. 314-318
Locating the Part Evoking SEP by Dipole Tracing Method
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Masahiro Koyama, Hisaya Tanaka and Hideto Ide
: pp. 319-325
Design and Experimental Validation of a Microgripper
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Giuseppe Carbone, Marco Ceccarelli, Hanfried Kerle and Annika Raatz
: pp. 326-331
Study on Turning of Micro Robot Driven by Cyclic Force
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Kiyoshi Ioi

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on Selected Papers from ROBOMEC'00

Special Issue on Selected Papers from ROBOMEC'00

: p. 113
Selected Papers from ROBOMEC’00
Kazuhito Yokoi and Tsutomu Hasegawa

This special issue has been proposed in honor of the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics that has been authorized to be the International Journal of the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers since 1999. The 2000 JSME Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’00) was held in Kumamoto, May 11-13, 2000, sponsored by the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. The purpose of the conference was to aid future establishments of new industries by using advanced technologies of Robotics and Mechatronics. In the technical sessions, 82 organized sessions were held and a total of 653 papers were presented. 969 participants attended the conference. This special issue has been organized by editing the papers presented at ROBOMEC’00 to widely distribute the significant results of the conference. High quality papers of the conference were invited to this journal and were reviewed again by the referees of this journal. Finally, 14 papers were selected for publication in the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics Special Issue on Selected Papers from ROBOMEC’00 (Vol. 13, No. 2). We would like to thank the authors in this special issue who have contributed their updated papers. Also, we would express our gratitude to contributed their updated papers. Also, we would express our gratitude to Editor in Chief, Prof. Makoto Kaneko (Hiroshima University) whose work has been indispensable in organizing this special issue and the Editors for providing the selection of the papers.

: pp. 114-124
Intelligent Control for Autonomous Mobile Robot based on Information Criterion on Virtual Environmental
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Kae Doki, Soichiro Hayakawa, Tatsuya Suzuki, Shigeru Okuma, and Takeshi Aoki
: pp. 125-133
Design and Implementation of Responsive Processor for Parallel/Distributed Control and Its Development Environments
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Nobuyuki Yamasaki
: pp. 134-139
Novel Device for Inputting Handwriting Trajectory
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Yasuhiro Sato, Mitsuru ShingYouuchi, Toshiyuki Furuta, and Tomohiko Beppu
: pp. 140-145
Micromotor Using Electroconjugate Fluid (Fabrication of Inner Diameter 2mm RE type ECF Motor)
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Shinichi Yokota, Masakazu Hirata, Yutaka Kondoh, Koichi Suzumori, Atsushi Sadamoto, Yasufumi Otsubo, and Kazuya Edamura
: pp. 146-153
3-D Nanorobotic Manipulation of Nanometer-scale Objects
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Lixin Dong, Fumihito Arai, and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 154-159
Autonomous Knowledge Acquisition and Revision by Intelligent Data Carriers in a Dynamic Environment
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Daisuke Kurabayashi, and Hajime Asama
: pp. 160-167
Development of a Holonomic Omni-Directional Mobile Robot with Step-Climbing Ability
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Atsushi Yamashita, Tatsuya Kanazawa, Hajime Asama, Hayato Kaetsu, Isao Endo, Tamio Arai, and Kazumi Sato
: pp. 168-175
A Virtual Sports System for Skill Training
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Toshio Tsuji, Yasuteru Sumida, Makoto Kaneko, and Sadao Kawamura
: pp. 176-182
Design of Active Cord Mechanism ACM-R2 to Realize 3-D Motions
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Keiji Togawa and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 183-189
Human-Assist-Robot for Nursing Use
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Takeshi Aoki and Kan Taguchi
: pp. 190-197
Quadruped Walking Robot with Reduced Degrees of Freedom
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Kan Yoneda, Yusuke Ota, Fumitoshi Ito, and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 198-204
“Active Hose”: an Artificial Elephant’s Trunk for Rescue Operations
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Ato Kitagawa, Hideyuki Tsukagoshi, Mitsuru Segawa, and Toshiya Takeda
: pp. 205-211
Development of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle “Tri-Dog” Toward Practical Use in Shallow Water
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Hayato Kondo, Tamaki Ura, and Yoshiaki Nose
: pp. 212-219
Micro Self-reconfigurable Modular Robot Using Shape Memory Alloy
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Eiichi Yoshida, Satoshi Murata, Shigeru Kokaji, Kohji Tomita, and Haruhisa Kurokawa

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Robotics and Mechatronics Which Lead the 21st Century

Special Issue on Robotics and Mechatronics Which Lead the 21st Century

: p. 3
Robotics and Mechatronics Which Lead the 21st Century
Takayuki Tanaka

Today we celebrate the 21st Century’s first issue of the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics. Modern robotics technology was initiated by 2 US industrial robots, Unimate and Versatran, developed in 1962. George C. Devol’s US patent in 1958 on the programmable machine advantageous in repetitive work provided a key technology for both industrial robots and robotics. “Programmable” combines machines (hardware) and computer (software). One of the most outstanding examples of this combination is mechatronics. Products based on mechatronics technology (MT) include industrial equipment, home appliances, and personal goods. In Japan, MT products have been occupying the largest part of export on a money basis since the 1960s. Although the main interest of robotics was the industrial robot and its application to production automation up to the 1980s, concepts and products related to a robotics have changed and expanded its realm from production use to personal use, expanding the coexistence of the robot and human beings. Honda Motor Corp. released the Humanoid P2, the world’s first human-like biped able to walk dynamically in 1997. It created worldwide surprise and enthusiasm. Two years after the appearance of P2, Sony Corp. put its canine robot AIBO into the world market where it created an even greater shock than P2. We recognize three important technologies that have accomplished major human global development in the last half of the 20th century. They are information technology (IT) based on computer technology, MT including robotic technology and biotechnology (BT). We believe these three will prevail as fundamental technologies in the first half of the 21 st Century and the combination or integration of these technologies such as I-MT, B-MT, I-BT, and B-IT will become more and more important in providing fruitful results. In closing, I would like to express my cordial thanks to all authors who submitted such informative and invaluable papers for this issue.

: pp. 4-5
Expected Appearance of Near-Future-Type Robot
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Yoshiaki Komura
: pp. 6-11
Maglev Systems Based on Combined Propulsion and Levitation Hybrid Technology
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Liang-Yuan Wang, and Pei-Jen Wang
: pp. 12-16
Desired Signal Planning of Flexible Arm for Reduction Control of Residual Vibration
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Hiroyuki Kojima
: pp. 17-22
Development of Pneumatic Rotary Soft Actuator Made of Silicone Rubber
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Toshiro Noritsugu, Mitsuhiko Kubota, and Sadaharu Yoshimatsu
: pp. 23-29
Measurement of Chaotic Behavior of Operator Stabilizing an Inverted Pendulum and Its Fuzzy Identification from Time Series Data
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Yoshihiko Kawazoe
: pp. 30-35
Automation of Chamfering by an Industrial Robot; Development of a System with Reference to Tool Application Direction
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Naoki Asakawa, Yoshio Mizumoto, and Yoshimi Takeuchi
: pp. 36-41
Desktop Microdrilling System by Multiple Miniature Robots
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Hisayuki Aoyama, Shigeru Tadokoro, and Tomohiro Shigeno
: pp. 42-49
Mechatronics Technology Which Assists Human Life from Nursing to Amusement
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Shoichiro Fujisawa, Tadahiro Kaneda, Takashi Nishi, Naoki Satonaka, Toshitaka Umemoto, Tomoharu Doi, Takeo Yoshida, Ryota Kurozumi, and Yoshikazu Suita
: pp. 50-55
Ensemble by Seven Musical Performance Robots
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Tadahiro Kaneda, Shoichiro Fujisawa, Takeo Yoshida, Yasumasa Yoshitani, Takashi Nishi, Yasunari Shidama, and Katsumi Wasaki
: pp. 56-63
Flexible Pneumatic Actuators: A Comparison between The McKibben and the Straight Fibres Muscles
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Carlo Ferraresi, Walter Franco, and Andrea Manuello Bertetto
: pp. 64-67
Development of High Precision Winding Machine for Toroidal Coil
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Takashi Kawamura, Masayasu Shimaru, and Masaru Nakazawa
: pp. 68-73
New Biological Real-time Pattern Extraction Emulating Fly’s Behavior
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Takayuki Tanaka, Kazuo Yamafuji, and Yasunori Yamazaki
: pp. 74-79
Development of a Robot for Evaluating Tennis Rackets
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Junji Furusho, Masamichi Sakaguchi, Naoyuki Takesue, Fuminobu Sato, Takeshi Naruo, and Hiroshi Nagao
: pp. 80-87
Modeling and Motion Control of a Bidirectional -Rotational- Type ER Actuator
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Masamichi Sakaguchi, Guoguang Zhang, and Junji Furusho
: pp. 88-95
Embodiment-Based Object Recognition for Vision-Based Mobile Agents
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Kazunori Terada, Takayuki Nakamura, Hideaki Takeda, and Tsukasa Ogasawara
: pp. 96-100
Propulsion Mechanism Modeled on Bending Mechanism of Eukaryotic Flagellar Bending in Water
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Shunichi Kobayashi, Kozo Furihata, and Hirohisa Morikawa
: pp. 101-106
Rights to Intellectual Property on R&D Results Conducted at University
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Kazuo Yamafuji, and Takayuki Tanaka

Vol.12 (2000)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Intelligent Control in Coming New Generation

Special Issue on Intelligent Control in Coming New Generation

: pp. 603-604
Intelligent Control in Coming New Generation
Shigeyasu Kawaji and Tetsuo Sawaragi

In the early 1970s, a concept of intelligent control was proposed by Fu, and since then the advancement of control technologies as a migrate of control theory, artificial intelligence and operations research has been actively attempted. The breakthrough of this concept was to integrate a human judgment and a concept of value as well as management theory into conventional control theoretic approaches, and synthesize these as artificial intelligence. A number of unconventional control techniques have evolved, offering solutions to many difficult control problems in industry and manufacturing. Saridis proposed a general architecture for intelligent control and proposed a design principle of such a hierarchical system as the principle of Increasing Precision with Decreasing Intelligence. During the first generation of intelligent control, a number of intelligent methodologies besides the purely symbolic and logical processing of human knowledge were introduced. They are broadly called soft computing techniques that include artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithm, and chaos theory. These techniques have contributed much to the advancement of intelligent control from the viewpoint of its “intelligence” part, but no solutions are provided from a control theoretic viewpoint, and the definition of intelligence in terms of control theory is still left questionable. To discuss this issue, we initiated a specialist’s meeting on survey of intelligent control in 1997 organized under the Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan, and discussed the current status as well as future perspectives of intelligent control. Some of the papers contributed to this special issue are results obtained in this series of meetings. During that time, the framework of intelligent control has entered the second generation. In the first stage, this framework was discussed in terms of utilized methodologies such as control theory, artificial intelligence, and operations research seeking optimal combinations of these methodologies wherein a distinction is made between the controller, the plant, and the external environment and representations as well as state concepts utilized were a priorily determined and fixed without flexibility. In contrast, the second generation intelligent control system must emphasize a biologically inspired architecture that can accommodate the flexible and dynamic capabilities of living systems including human beings. That is, it must be able to grow and develop increasing capabilities of self-control, self-awareness of representation and reasoning about self and of constructing a coherent whole out of different representations. Actually, a new branch of research on artificial life and system theory of function emergence has shifted the perspectives of intelligence from conventional reductionism to a new design principle based on the concept of “emergence”. Thus, their approach is quite new in that they attempt to build models that bring together self-organizing mechanisms with evolutionary computation. Such a trend has forced us to reconsider the biological system and/or natural intelligence. In this special issue, we focus on the aspects of semiosis within a multigranular architecture and of emergent properties and techniques for human-machine and/or multiagent collaborative control systems in the coming new generation. These topics are mutually interrelated; the role of multivariable and multiresolutional quantization and clustering for designing intelligent controllers is essential for realizing the abilities to learn unknown multidimensional functions and/or for letting a joint system, which consists of an external environment, a human, and a machine, self-organize distinctive roles in a bottom-up and emerging fashion. This special issue includes papers on proposals of conceptual architecture, methodologies and reports from practical field studies on the hierarchical architecture of machines for realizing hierarchical collaboration and coordination among machine and human autonomies. We believe that these papers will lead to answers to the above questions. We sincerely thank the contributors and reviewers who made this special issue possible. Thanks also go to the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics, Prof. Makoto Kaneko (Hiroshima University), who provided the opportunity for editing this special issue.

: pp. 605-613
A Control-Theoretic View of Intelligent Control
Abstract
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Shigeyasu Kawaji
: pp. 614-627
Emerging Intelligence for Next-Generation Intelligent Systems and Control
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Tetsuo Sawaragi
: pp. 628-639
Human-Integrated Supervisory Control of Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles
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S. Narayanan, Heath A. Ruff, Narasimha Rao Edala, Jonathan A. Geist, Kiran Kumar Patchigolla, Mark Draper and Mike Haass
: pp. 640-649
Semiotic Approach to Perceptual State Construction for Behavior-Based Robot through Recursive and Progressive Deepening Utilization of Memory
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Tetsuo Sawaragi and Satoshi Iwatsu
: pp. 650-655
Flexible Intelligence Machine Control and its Application to Jacket Tank Temperature Control
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Masaki Arao, Toshihiro Tashima, and Shigeyasu Kawaji
: pp. 656-663
Building up Embodiment in Learning Agents Using A Gaussian Radial Basis Function Neural Network
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Hajime Murao and Shinzo Kitamura
: pp. 664-674
A New Fuzzy Inference Method for Symbolic Stability Analysis of Multigranular Intelligent Control System
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Hidehiro Yamamoto and Takeshi Furuhashi
: pp. 675-681
System Identification and Control using Probabilistic Incremental Program Evolution Algorithm
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Yuehui Chen and Shigeyasu Kawaji
: pp. 682-688
Knowledge Acquisition by Improved Fuzzy ID3 Algorithm and Stability Analysis for Jacket Tank Temperature Control
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Masaki Arao, Masahito Tanaka and Shigeyasu Kawaji
: pp. 689-701
Control of a Mobile Service Robot Using Human Evaluations of Task-related Movement Patterns
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John Travis Butler and Arvin Agah
: pp. 702-705
Fault Detection of Automobile Transmission Gears Using General Parameter Methods
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Yasuhiko Dote, Seppo J. Ovaska, and Xiao-Zhi Gao
: pp. 706-711
Bolt Tightening Using Impact Wrench Based on Neural Networks
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Toru Fujinaka, Hirofumi Nakano, Michifumi Yoshioka, and Sigeru Omatu
: pp. 712-717
A Co-operative Transferring Task by Mobile Manipulators
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Kazuya Yasui, Toshiyuki Murakami, and Kouhei Ohnishi
: pp. 718-724
The Evaluation Method of Arousal Level by Local Fractal Analysis of Facial Skin Temperature
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Hisaya Tanaka and Hideto Ide
: pp. 725-730
Determination of MRCP Evocation Model and Its Parameters
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Hisaya Tanaka, Ayako Shinokubo and Hideto Ide

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Intelligent Integrated Systems for Human-Oriented Information Society

Special Issue on Intelligent Integrated Systems for Human-Oriented Information Society

: p. 501
Intelligent Integrated Systems for Human-Oriented Information Society
Michitaka Kameyama

Recent advance in the information technology makes our society very convenient from the viewpoint of human-to-human information communication. However, our new living style will require not only human-tohuman communication but also autonomous intelligent applications that support human beings such as an intelligent robot system, an intelligent transportation system, and a security/safe system as shown in Figure. These applications will contribute to human-oriented information society.Intelligent vehicle Home service robot Security The use of special-purpose VLSI processors capable of processing a large amount of real-world data is essential to make such applications realistic. In recent industrial trend, the special-purpose processors are called “System LSIs”. One of the most important environmental informations in real-world applications is a vision information. The factor common to the applications is to catch an environment information moment by moment and to respond quickly with it. Therefore, it is important to make the response time from inputs to outputs very small. In this case, sensor data transfer bottleneck is not allowed as well as memory-to-PE (Processing Element) data transfer bottleneck. An image sensor signal processing VLSI together with image sensor devices is a key issue in such applications. From the above point of views, this special issue was planned to demonstrate the recent results of this area. Finally, I would like to express my appreciation to the authors for their efforts and contributions to this special issue and also the members of the Editorial Board for their cooperation.

: pp. 502-507
A CMOS Image Sensor with Non-Destructive High-Speed Imaging Mode and Its Applications
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Dwi Handoko, Shoji Kawahito, Minoru Kumahara, Nobuhiro Kawai , Yoshiaki Tadokoro and Akira Matsuzawa
: pp. 508-514
A Binary Image Sensor for Motion Detection
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Tomohiro Nezuka, Takafumi Fujita, Makoto Ikeda and Kunihiro Asada
: pp. 515-520
Device and System Development of General Purpose Digital Vision Chip
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Takashi Komuro, Shingo Kagami, Idaku Ishii, and Masatoshi Ishikawa
: pp. 521-526
Stereo Vision VLSI Processor Based on Pixel-Serial and Window-Parallel Architecture
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Masanori Hariyama and Michitaka Kameyama
: pp. 527-533
Path Planning Based on Distance Transformation and Its VLSI Implementation
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Masanori Hariyama and Michitaka Kameyama
: pp. 534-540
Design of a VLSI Processor Based on an Immediate Output Generation Scheduling for Ball-Trajectory Prediction
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Hideki Kazama, Masanori Hariyama, and Michitaka Kameyama
: pp. 541-544
Tracking of Moving Object by Phase-only Correlation
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Hiroshi Sasaki, Kazumasa Nomura, Hiroshi Nakajima and Koji Kobayashi
: pp. 545-551
A Next-Generation Intelligent Car for Safe Drive
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Takashi Emura, Masaaki Kumagai, and Lei Wang
: pp. 552-558
Development of a Low Resistance Micro Electro Magnetic Distance Sensor Using High Aspect Ratio Photo Resist
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Xianhe Ding, Katsutoshi Kuribayashi and Takao Hashida
: pp. 559-566
Study on Roller-Walker – Multi-mode Steering Control and Self-Contained Locomotion –
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Gen Endo and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 567-576
Robot Manipulation Using Virtual Compliance Control
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Hisaaki Hirabayashi, Koichi Sugimoto, Atsuko Enomoto and Ichirou Ishimaru
: pp. 577-584
Planning Strategy for Task of Unfolding Clothes (Classification of Clothes)
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Kyoko Hamajima and Masayoshi Kakikura
: pp. 585-592
Construction of Cooperative Space Robot Systems and Analysis of Their Working Abilities
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Jun Kobayashi, Ryozo Katoh and Fujio Ohkawa
: pp. 593-602
Evaluation of Wheel Performance on Rough Terrain and Development of HS Wheel
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Yasuyuki Uchida, Kazuya Furuichi and Shigeo Hirose

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Advanced Space Robotics

Special Issue on Advanced Space Robotics

: p. 333
Advanced Space Robotics
Takashi Kuboda

Toward the turn of the century, several missions to explore deep space such as the moon, Mars, asteroids, and comets are being planned for scientific observation. Recently, many researchers have studied and developed lunar or planetary rovers for unmanned planet surface exploration. Microrover missions have received much attention. In July 1997, NASA/JPL succeeded in the Mars Pathfinder mission and the Sojourner rover moved over the Martian surface gathering and transmitting voluminous amounts of data back to the Earth. NASA plans to send robots to Mars in 2003 and 2005 Missions. In Japan, the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) launched the Nozomi, a Mars’s orbiter. ISAS plans to send Lunar-A spacecraft with penetrators to the moon and is also promoting the MUSES-C mission for asteroid sample return. ISAS and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) are cooperatively promoting the SELENE mission, whose major objectives are to acquire scientific data on lunar origin and evolution, and to develop technology for future lunar exploration. NASDA launched the ETS-VII satellite in 1997 for rendezvous docking and orbital robotics experiments. The International Space Station (ISS) is under construction by international cooperation. We will shortly start robotics activities onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) named KIBOU for the ISS. Space robotics including Al is a key technology for planetary exploration. Space robotics is expected to support space activities, such as external vehicular activities (EVA) and internal vehicular activities (IVA) for future space utilization. Future space projects will require space robotics technology to construct, repair and maintain satellites and space structures in orbit. This special issue on advanced space robotics introduces updated mission results and advanced research activities of space organizations, institutes, and universities, although it does not include all. We hope that this special issue will be useful to readers as an introduction to advanced space robotics in Japan, and that more robotics and Al researchers and engineers will become interested in space robotics and participate in space missions. We thank those researchers who have contributed their advanced research activities to this special issue, and deeply appreciate their earnest efforts.

: pp. 334-342
Moving Method of Space Robot Pushing Walls
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Toshiaki Iwata and Hiroshi Murakami
: pp. 343-350
Hardware Experiments of Autonomous Space Robot – A Demonstration of Truss Structure Assembly –
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Kei Senda, Yoshisada Murotsu, Akira Mitsuya, Hirokazu Adachi, Shin'ichi Ito, and Jynya Shitakubo
: pp. 351-355
Force Control of a Space Manipulator
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Katsuyoshi Tsujita, Kazuo Tsuchiya and Yousuke Kawano
: pp. 356-363
Experimental Verification of an Advanced Space Teleoperation System Using the Internet
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Yuichi Tsumaki, Toshihiko Goshozono, Koyu Abe, Masaru Uchiyama, Ralf Koeppe and Gerd Hirzinger
: pp. 364-370
Development and Space Operation of Advanced Robotic Hand System
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Kazuo Machida, Hirotaka Nishida and Kenzo Akita
: pp. 371-377
Precise In-Orbit Servicing by Multisensory Hand-Connected with Long Arm
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Kazuo Machida, Yoshitsugu Toda and Mitsushige Oda
: pp. 378-384
An Experimental Teleoperation System for Dual-Arm Space Robotics
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Woo-Keun Yoon, Yuichi Tsumaki and Masaru Uchiyama
: pp. 385-393
A Practical Control Scheme for Autonomous Capture of Free-Flying Satellites by Space Robotic Manipulator based on Predictive Trajectory
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Hiroyuki Nagamatsu, Takashi Kubota and Ichiro Nakatani
: pp. 394-401
Teleoperation Techniques for Assembling an Antenna by using Space Robots – Experiments on Engineering Test Satellite VII –
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Shinichi Kimura, Shigeru Tsuchiya, Yasufumi Nagai, Kazuo Nakamura, Kenichi Satoh, Hajime Morikawa and Nobuaki Takanashi
: pp. 402-410
Space Robot Dynamics and Control: a Historical Perspective
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Kazuya Yoshida
: pp. 411-416
The SpaceDyn: a MATLAB Toolbox for Space and Mobile Robots
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Kazuya Yoshida
: pp. 417-424
Summary of NASDA’s ETS-VII robot satellite mission
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Mitsushige Oda
: pp. 425-431
Design Concept and System Architecture of Reconfigurable Brachiating Space Robot
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Ryoichi Hayashi, Saburo Matunaga and Yoshiaki Ohkami
: pp. 432-437
Semi-Autonomous Telescience System for Planetary Exploration Rover
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Tetsuo Yoshimitsu, Miharu Ootsuka, Takashi Kubota and Ichiro Nakatani
: pp. 438-442
Mission-Task Support Aspects of Planetary Rover for Surface Analysis
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Nobuto Yoshioka
: pp. 443-445
AI, Robotics and Automation in Space
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Ichiro Nakatani
: pp. 446-452
Design of Three-wheeled Planetary Rover Tri-StarII
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Shigeo Hirose and Hiroyuki Kuwabara
: pp. 453-458
Development of Magnetic Recording to GOV-Rope
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Hisaya Tanaka, Nobuyuki Sudou, Hideto Ide and Masafumi Uchida
: pp. 459-465
Motion Planning for Six-Legged Locomotion Robot Based on Hierarchical Knowledge Using Genetic Programming
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Kentarou Kurashige, Toshio Fukuda and Haruo Hoshino
: pp. 466-473
An Evolutionary Algorithm for CT Image Reconstruction
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Fathelalem F. Ali, Kazunori Matsuo, Zensho Nakao and Yen-Wei Chen
: pp. 474-479
Determination of Meat Quality by Image Processing and Neural Network Techniques
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Kazuhiko Shiranita, Kenichiro Hayashi and Akifumi Otsubo
: pp. 480-493
Open-loop Force Control of A Three-finger Gripper Through PWM Modulated Pneumatic Digital Valves
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Giorgio Figliolini and Massimo Sorli
: pp. 494-500
Autonomous Formation of Transportation Order under Dynamical Environment
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Toshimitsu Higashi, Kosuke Sekiyama and Toshio Fukuda

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on 2nd International Conference on Recent Advances in Mechatronics (ICRAM'99)

Special Issue on 2nd International Conference on Recent Advances in Mechatronics (ICRAM'99)

: p. 193
2nd International Conference on Recent Advances in Mechatronics (ICRAM’99)
Toshiro Noritsugu

ICRAM’99 has been organized by UNESCO Chair on Mechatronics and Mechatronics Research and Application Center of Bogazici University, Istanbul in Turkey, during 24-26 May 1999, co-sponsored by IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Industrial Electronics Society and IEEE Robotics and Automation Society. The purpose of this conference is to provide an international forum for the discussion on the most recent advances in the field of mechatronics. The program of the conference contains three kinds of papers, 4 plenary papers, 44 long papers and 90 regular papers. The long papers have been published by Springer-Verlag (ISBN 981-4021-34-2), under the name Recent Advances in Mechatronics (Eds. Okyay Kaynak, Sabri Tosunoglu and Marcelo Ang Jr.). The long papers have been presented in the following 12 sessions: Advances in Robotics, Motion control 1, Intelligent Techniques in Mechatronics 1, Virtual Techniques and Telecommanding, Robust Adaptive Control, Design of Mechanical System 1, Fault Detection and Inspection 1, Motion Control 2, Intelligent Techniques in Mechatronics 2, Analysis of Mechatronic Systems, Mobile Robots 1 and Biomedical Applications. For the regular papers, Modeling and Simulation, Trajectory Planning and Control, Variable-Structure Control Systems, Control of Mechatronic Systems, Production Automation, Machine Vision, Adaptive Control, Design of Mechatronic Systems 2, Measurement Technology, Intelligent Systems, Control of Robot Manipulators, Flexible Manufacturing Systems, Education and Training in Mechatronics, Neural Networks and Applications, Fuzzy Systems, Hydraulic and Pneumatic Applications, Mobile Robots 2, Control Applications and Sensors and Actuators. The papers have been submitted to the conference from 30 countries in the world. From Japan 14 papers have been presented, one plenary paper, S long papers and 8 regular papers. This special issue comprises 10 papers edited from the conference papers contributed from Japan. Each paper has been revised and updated for this issue from the original conference paper to describe the recent status of research and development of mechatronics in Japan. The included papers are concerned with some important and attractive subjects such as mobile robot, robot behavior evolution, nanoelectromechanical system, magnetic suspension, human symbiotic robot, stereovision, force control of robot, soft pneumatic actuator and so on. I would like to thank all the authors for their valuable contributions to this issue.

: pp. 194-201
Computational Intelligence for Mobile Robotic Systems – Decision Making, Learning, and Planning –
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Toshio Fukuda and Naoyuki Kubota
: pp. 202-208
A Method of Robot Behavior Evolution Based on Intelligent Composite Motion Control
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Masakazu Suzuki
: pp. 209-217
Macro to Nano Tele-Manipulation Towards Nanoelectromechanical Systems
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Metin Sitti and Hideki Hashimoto
: pp. 218-223
Development of a Hysteresis Amplifier with an H-bridge Drive for Self-Sensing Magnetic Suspension
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Takeshi Mizuno and Yuji Ishino
: pp. 224-230
Design Strategies of Human Symbiotic Robot WENDY
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Toshio Morita, Hiroyasu Iwata and Shigeki Sugano
: pp. 231-234
New Stereovision for Human-Robot Communications
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Junichi Takeno, and Zichuan Xu
: pp. 235-241
Error Recovery of Autonomous Mobile Robot With Global Matching
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Yasunori Abe, Yoshio Tanaka, Shintaro Sakamoto, Toshio Fukuda, Fumihito Arai, and Masaru Shikano
: pp. 242-248
Coordinated Transportation of a Single Object by Omni-Directional Mobile Robots with Body Force Sensor
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Yasuhisa Hirata, Kazuhiro Kosuge, Tomohiro Oosumi, Hajime Asama, Hayato Kaetsu and Kuniaki Kawabata
: pp. 249-253
Development of an Active Worktable and Its Application to Force Control of Robot Manipulators
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Shin-ichi Nakajima
: pp. 254-260
Soft Planar Actuator using Pneumatic-Rubber Balls
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Toshiro Noritsugu, Daijyu Kaneshiro and Takashi Inoue
: pp. 261-267
Development of the Quadruped Walking Robot for Humanitarian Demining (Proposal of the System and Basic Experiment of Several Foot-end-effectors)
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Keisuke Kato and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 268-274
Proposition and Basic Experiments of Shape Feedback Master-Slave Arm (On the Application for the Demining Robots)
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Keisuke Kato and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 275-280
An Advanced Pilot Training and Control System for Underwater Robotic Vehicles
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Gerald Seet, Tan Kok Cheng, Michael W. S. Lau, and Eicher Low
: pp. 281-285
Application of the Robust Pole Assignment Technique for Vibration Control of Structures
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Takashi Fujimoto
: pp. 286-291
Development of Vital Sign Sensor by Using Fiber-optics
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Eiji Toba, Takahiro Shimada, Tuyoshi Kamoto, Toyonori Nishimatsu and Hiroaki Ishizawa
: pp. 292-303
Deforming and Cutting Operation with Force Sensation
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Atsuko Tanaka, Koichi Hirota and Toyohisa Kaneko
: pp. 304-309
Proposal of Artificial Larynx Using PZT Ceramics Vibrator as Sound Source
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Katsutoshi Ooe, Toshio Fukuda, and Fumihito Arai
: pp. 310-317
Design and Experiments of In-pipe Inspection Vehicles for ø25, ø50, ø150 Pipes
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Shigeo Hirose, Hidetaka Ohno, Takeo Mitsui and Kiichi Suyama
: pp. 318-324
Human Dynamic Skill in High Speed Actions and Its Realization by Robot
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Aiguo Ming and Makoto Kajitani
: pp. 325-332
Development of a Golf Swing Robot to Simulate Human Skill
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Aiguo Ming and Makoto Kajitani

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on ROBOMEC'99

Special Issue on ROBOMEC'99

: p. 65
ROBOMEC’99
Kazuhito Yokoi

This special issue is proposed in honor of the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics authorized as the International Journal of the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers from 1999. The 1999 JSME Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’99) was held in Tokyo, on June 11-13, 1999, sponsored by the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. The purpose of the conference was to aid establishment of new industries using advanced Robotics and Mechatronics technologies. In the technical sessions, 81 sessions were held and a total of 579 papers presented to 946 participants. This special issue has been organized by editing papers presented at ROBOMEC’99 to distribute the significant results of the conference. I thank the authors who have contributed their papers to this special issue and thank Editor in Chief Prof. Makoto Kaneko (Hiroshima University), who has been indispensable in organizing this special issue. I also thank the Editors for the selection of papers.

: pp. 66-71
Development of Dual Mode X-screw -A Novel Load-Sensitive Linear Actuator with a Wide Transmission Range-
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Tetsuto Hagiwara and Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 72-77
Self-diagnosis System of an Autonomous Mobile Robot Using Sensory Information
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Shinnosuke Okina, Kuniaki Kawabata, Teruo Fujii, Yasuharu Kunii, Hajime Asama and Isao Endo
: pp. 78-83
Development of an Omnidirectional Rolling Leg Mechanism for Application in a Locomotion Machine
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Nobutoshi Yamazaki and Takehiro Nishiie
: pp. 84-90
Development of Suspender Device Controlled by Gyroscopic Moments (Outline of Original Device and Its Improvement)
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Fumihiro Inoue, Kouji Watanabe, Akira Wakabayashi, and Yoshitsugu Nekomoto
: pp. 91-95
Proposition of Microrover System for Lunar Exploration
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Yoji Kuroda, Yasuharu Kunii and Takashi Kubota
: pp. 96-102
Miniaturization of Self-Reconfigurable Robotic System using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators
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Eiichi Yoshida, Shigeru Kokaji, Satoshi Murata, Kohji Tomita and Haruhisa Kurokawa
: pp. 103-109
Path Planning and Control for a Flexible Transfer System
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Naoyuki Kubota, Yusuke Nojima, Fumio Kojima, Toshio Fukuda and Susumu Shibata
: pp. 110-117
Wearable System Based on Concept of Action and Speech Sharing Between Human-and System
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Taketoshi Mori, Katsutoshi Asaki and Tomomasa Sato
: pp. 118-125
Assembly Support Based on Human Model -Provision of Physical Support According to Implicit Desire for Support-
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Yasuhisa Hayakawa, Ikuo Kitagishi, Yusuke Kira, Kensuke Satake, Tetsuya Ogata and Shigeki Sugano
: pp. 126-134
An Embodied Interaction Robots System Based on Speech
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Tomio Watanabe, Masashi Okubo and Hiroki Ogawa
: pp. 135-143
Design of Human-machine Cooperative Telemanipulation Based on Extended Virtual Tool Dynamics
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Tomotaka Itoh, Akitaka Ando, Fumiyoshi Omura, Takashi Matsui, Kazuhiro Kosuge and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 144-149
Adaptive Logic Circuits Based on Net-list Evolution
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Tomokazu Shindo, Hiroshi Yokoi and Yukinori Kakazu
: pp. 150-157
Walking Microrobot Mechanism with an Exoskeleton
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Tetsuji Dohi, Kousuke Kishi, Takashi Yasuda, and Isao Shimoyama
: pp. 158-164
A Control Method for Gathering Patterns of Multiple Micromachines
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Yoshiki Shimomura, Hitoshi Hasunuma, Kazunori Makino, Masataka Koyama, Yasuo Nakano and Yasuo Otsuki
: pp. 165-171
Analysis of Swimming Properties and Design of Spiral-Type Magnetic Micromachine
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Masahiko Sendoh, Noriyuki Ajiro, Kazushi Ishiyama, Mitsuteru Inoue, Toshiyuki Hayase and Ken Ichi Arai
: pp. 172-179
Real-time FEM Control System for Connected Piezoelectric Actuators
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Daigoro Isobe, Hiroshi Nakamura and Ryuta Shimizu
: pp. 180-189
A Study on Evolutionary Design in Balancing Morphology and Intelligence of Robotic Systems
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Kohki Kikuchi and Fumio Hara
: pp. 190-192
Toner Removal System from Copied Paper
Abstract
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Kohki Isago

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Virtual Reality

Special Issue on Virtual Reality

: p. 1
Virtual Reality
Takashi Takeda

Special Issue on Virtual Reality Achieved by Researchers in Kyushu This special issue on virtual reality technologies recently developed by researchers in Kyushu has been compiled to introduce their activities to readers throughout the world. Kyushu Island, in southwest Japan, has long played an important role in Japan’s cultural progress. Kyushu researchers have contributed much, for instance, to the steel making and shipbuilding industries. The Kyushu region is an important IC production base for such key devices as computers. While the region plays important roles in modern industry, it is also blessed with a moderate climate and a rich natural environment, providing residents with a comfortable of living. The region has thus served deeply for international exchanges with neighboring Asian nations since ancient times, thanks to its geographical advantages. The region has served to help develop Japan with advanced technology acquired in such international exchanges in every era. Thanks to its environment, people in the region are blessed with a deeply rooted sophisticated spirit and culture. They have an excellent engineering sense important to goods production and are highly creative and innovative. Reflecting these factors, the new field of virtual reality technology has been readily adopted and R&D on virtual reality is active in the region. Achievements in virtual reality developed in Kyushu are presented in this issue to introduce the region’s to colleagues worldwide and promote international exchange. We hope that our contributions will be of aid to researchers around the globe.

: pp. 2-10
Presentation of Assembly Condition and Subassembly Function Using Two Force Feedback Displays
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Ryoko Furusawa, Kazuaki Tanaka, Norihiro Abe, Katsuya Matsunaga and Hirokazu Taki
: pp. 11-17
Operation Supporting System of Tools in Virtual World
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Kazuhiro Annoura, Norihiro Abe, Kazuaki Tanaka, and Hirokazu Taki
: pp. 18-23
Measuring Device for Large Piping Structures
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Kazuo Ichimura, Kiyohide Yui and Takakazu Ishimatsu
: pp. 24-28
Three-D Measurement Using Laser Theodolite
Abstract
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Kazuo Ichimura, Mitsuyoshi Fujii, Youichi Tasaki and Takakazu Ishimatsu
: pp. 29-34
Modular Distributed Control Architecture for Cooperative Soccer-Playing Robot Agents
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Gen'ichi Yasuda
: pp. 35-39
Interaction Using Multiview Representation in a Large-Scale Virtual Environment
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Dahlan Nariman, Hiroaki Nishino, Kouichi Utsumiya, and Kazuyoshi Korida
: pp. 40-47
Visual Interface For Remote Control
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Kazunori Shidoji, Katsuya Matsunaga, Masahiko Minamoto, Yasuhiro Nose, Kazuhisa Ebuchi and Yuji Matsuki
: pp. 48-52
Construction of Virtual Reality System for Arm Wrestling with Interactive Evolutional Computing
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Sinichi Kamohara, Yutaka Ichinose, Takashi Takeda and Hideyuki Takagi
: pp. 53-59
Rehabilitation Support by Multiaxis Force Display
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Shinichi Kamohara, Takashi Yamada, Yutaka Ichinose, Takashi Takeda, and Hideyuki Takagi
: pp. 60-65
AUV with Variable Vector Propeller
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Yutaka Nagashima, Takakazu Ishimatsu and Jamal Tariq Mian

Vol.11 (1999)

No.6

(Dec)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: pp. 455-460
Robot Hand and Finger Motion Using EMG
Abstract
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Masafumi Uchida, Hisaya Tanaka, Hideto Ide and Syuichi Yokoyama
: pp. 461-467
Improvement of Maneuverability of Man-Machine System for Wearable Nursing Robots
Abstract
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Satoki Morishita, Takayuki Tanaka, Kazuo Yamafuji and Naoki Kanamori
: pp. 468-472
Environment Mapping Robot Using Supersonic Sensor
Abstract
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Masafumi Uchida, Tanaka Hisaya, and Hideto Ide
: pp. 473-476
Power Assist Control Developed for Walking Support
Abstract
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Yasuhiro Nemoto, Saku Egawa and Masakatsu Fujie
: pp. 477-482
Design Methodology of Drive Guide for Crawl Stair Lift
Abstract
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Satoshi Hashino
: pp. 483-489
Estimation of Oxygen Desaturation by Analyzing Breathing Curves
Abstract
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Yoshifumi Nishida, Takashi Suehiro and Shigeoki Hirai
: pp. 490-494
Computer Interface Developed for the Person with Disabled Upper Limb
Abstract
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Tsumoru Ochiai, Yoshio Fukuda, Osamu Takami and Ryouji Matsui
: pp. 495-501
Recognition of Similar Patterns by Mutilayer Nets and Detection of Rotated Angle and Scale Ratio
Abstract
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Hiromu Gotanda, Kousaku Kawai and Tatsuya Yamaoka
: pp. 502-509
Fuzzy Behavior-Based Control for a Task of Three-Link Manipulator with Obstacle Avoidance
Abstract
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Palitha Dassanayake, Keigo Watanabe and Kiyotaka Izumi
: pp. 510-517
Joint Positions and Robot Stability of the Omnidirectional Crawling Quadruped Robot
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Xuedong Chen, Keigo Watanabe and Kiyotaka Izumi
: pp. 518-523
Torque Reduction Method for Redundant Manipulator
Abstract
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Kenji Uematsu and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 524-530
Intelligent Sensor Fault Detection of Vibration Control for Flexible Structures
Abstract
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Masahiro Isogai, Fumihito Arai and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 531-533
Autonomous Mobile Robot Carrying Food Trays to the Aged and Disabled – Robot Technology and Results of the Field Evaluation Test –
Abstract
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Tsugito Maruyama and Muneshige Yamazaki

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on ICAM'98 (2)

Special Issue on ICAM'98 (2)

: pp. 349-355
An Adaptive PI Control System for an Omnidirectional Mobile Robot
Abstract
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Kazuya Sato, Keigo Watanabe, Kiyotaka Izumi and Makoto Watanabe
: pp. 356-361
Reaction Force Control of a Parallel Biwheel Vehicle Driven with a Stepping Motor
Abstract
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Nobuaki Hiraoka and Toshiro Noritsugu
: pp. 362-366
Empirical Measurement toward an Emergent Perceptibility of Autonomous Robots
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Jun Hakura and Yukinori Kakazu
: pp. 367-373
Modeling and Feedback Control for Vibratory Feeder of Electromagnetic Type
Abstract
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Tomoharu Doi, Koji Yoshida, Yutaka Tamai, Katsuaki Kono, Kazufumi Naito and Toshiro Ono
: pp. 374-379
On-line Identification of Furnace Parameters for Coal-Fired Boiler Control
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Yukio Fukayama, Kotaro Hirasawa, Katsumi Shimohira, Toshikazu Tsumura, and Koji Yamamoto
: pp. 380-386
Laser Detection and Fast Negotiation of Steps with Unknown Position and Height by a Variable-Structure-Type 4-Wheeled Robot
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Takeshi Kikkawa, Osamu Matsumoto and Kazuo Tani
: pp. 387-392
Design of a Robotic System that Plays with a Yoyo
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Koichi Hashimoto and Toshiro Noritsugu
: pp. 393-398
An Analysis and Generation of Bunraku Puppet’s Motions Based on Linear Structure of Functional Factors, Emotional Factors and Stochastic Fluctuations for Generation of Humanoid Robots’ Actions with Fertile Emotions
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Motofumi Hattori, Masahiko Tsuji, Satoshi Tadokoro, Toshi Takamori and Kazuhito Yamada
: pp. 399-403
High-speed End Milling of Extruded Aluminum Alloys Using Articulated Robot
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Kazunori Shimizu, Shin-ichi Matsuoka, Nobuyuki Yamazaki and Yoshinari Oki
: pp. 404-410
Kinematic Synthesis of In-Parallel Actuated Mechanisms Based on the Global Isotropy Index
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Yukio Takeda and Hiroaki Funabashi
: pp. 411-416
Odometry in Cooperative Multi-Mobile Robots
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Masafumi Hashimoto, Takanori Kurazumi and Fuminori Oba
: pp. 417-422
In-pipe Mobile Micromachine Using Fluid Power Adaptable to Pipe Diameters
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Kazuhiro Yoshida, Ken Takahashi, and Shinichi Yokota
: pp. 423-430
Intelligent Monitoring System for Grinding Process by Recurrent Fuzzy Inference -Evaluation of Inferred Surface Roughness Using Degree of Fuzziness-
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Futoshi Kobayashi, Fumihito Arai, Toshio Fukuda, Makoto Onoda and Yuzo Hotta
: pp. 431-435
New Fabrication of Multiple-Layer Microcoil Using Anodic Oxidized Aluminum
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Kenichi Muraki and Katsutoshi Kuribayashi
: pp. 436-442
Cordless Optical Power Supply for Micromachine
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Hidenori Ishihara and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 443-447
Micro Autonomous Robotic System
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Hidenori Ishihara and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 448-453
Study of a Brush-Type Micro-Robot Using Micro Coreless Motor
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Kiyoshi Ioi

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on ICAM'98 (1)

Special Issue on ICAM'98 (1)

: p. 237
Assistive Device Technologies
Toshiro Noritsugu

Mechatronics is one of the most powerful technologies to overcome various industrial and social problems arising in the 21st century, for example, realization of the recycle manufacturing system, global consideration on the environment, development of human-oriented technology. The 3rd International Conference on Advanced Mechatronics (ICAM’98)-Innovative Mechatronics for the 21st Century hass been held in Okayama August 3-6, 1998, following the 1st and 2nd held in Tokyo in 1988 and 1993, sponsored by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. The purpose of the conference is to promote the creation of new technologies and industries such as advanced robotics and human-oriented technology for the coming 21st century. Two plenary talks and 35 technical sessions including 11 specially organized sessions were opened. In technical sessions, a total of 149 papers was presented, of which 61 papers were in organized sessions and 88 papers in general sessions. Some 47 papers came from 17 countries abroad and 102 papers from Japan. A number of registered participants excluding invited guests was 40 from other countries and 163 from Japan. After the technical program, the Advanced Robotics and Mechatronics symposium was held for tutorial reviews of future robotics and mechatronics, mainly focusing on “human collaboration” technology. More than 100 persons attended the symposium. Organized sessions included Analysis and Control of Robot Manipulators, Modeling and Control of Nonholonomic Underactuated Systems, Human Perspective Characteristics and Virtual Reality, Robotic Hand Design Grasping and Dexterous Manipulation, Healthcare Robotics, Advanced Fluid Power Control Technology, Advanced Robot Kinematics, Human Directed Robotics, Computer Support for Mechatronics System Design, Robotic Control, and Motion Control of Special Motors. Robotics was a main subject, but fluid power technology, fundamental motion control technology, and so on were also discussed. “Human collaboration” technology dealing with interaction between humans and robots attracted great attention from many participants. General sessions included Manufacturing, Vision, Micro Machine, Electric Actuator, Human-Robot Interface, Processing Technology, Fluid Actuator, Legged Locomotion, Control Strategy, Soft-Computing, Vehicle, Automation for Agriculture, Robot Force Control, Vibration, and Robot Application. Many studies have been presented over comprehensive subjects. This special issue has been organized by editing the papers presented at ICAM’98 for widely distributing the significant results of the conference. I would like to thank the authors in this special issue who have contributed their updated papers. Also, I would like to thank to Prof. Makoto Kaneko (Hiroshima University), whose work has been indispensable in organizing this special issue.

: pp. 238-243
Formation and Piezoelectric Property of PZT Film Synthesized Hydrothermally
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Yoko Ohba, Takaaki Tsurumi, Etsuo Sakai and Masaki Daimon
: pp. 244-250
Development of a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Micromotion Device Consisting of Soft Gel Actuators
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Satoshi Tadokoro, Shinji Yamagami, Tetsuya Kimura, Toshi Takamori and Kesuke Oguro
: pp. 251-257
Analysis of an Opto-Pneumatic Control System and Improvement of its Control Performance
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Tetsuya Akagi, Shujiro Dohta and Hisashi Matsushita
: pp. 258-262
Transformation and Mechanical Properties of TiNi Thin Films Sputter Deposited at Various Argon Pressures for Micromachine Actuators
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Seiji Shimizu and Katsutoshi Kuribayashi
: pp. 263-268
Air Impact Drive for Positioning by Pulse and Continuous Air Pressure
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Mohammad Hossein Kouklan, Yousef Hojjat and Toshiro Higuchi
: pp. 269-273
Mechanism Design of Anthropomorphic Robot Hand: Gifu Hand I
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Haruhisa Kawasaki and Tsuneo Komatsu
: pp. 274-282
Stability Analysis of Planar Grasp with 2D-Virtual Spring Model
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Takayoshi Yamada, Sushanta Kumar Saha, Nobuharu Mimura and Yasuyuki Funahashi
: pp. 283-288
Simulation of Pipeline Dynamics Using an Optimized Finite Element Model
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Kazushi Sanada
: pp. 289-297
Sub-optimal Operating Time for Saving Energy of an Articulated Manipulator
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Teruyuki Izumi and Hai Zhou
: pp. 298-303
Dynamic Walking Control of the One-Legged Robot With Controlling Rotor (Directional Walking with Yaw Angle Control)
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Kan Taguchi, Yasuyuki Momoi and Kazuo Yamafuji
: pp. 304-309
Biped Walking Using Multiple-Link Virtual Inverted Pendulum Models
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Takayuki Furuta, Hideaki Yamato and Ken Tomiyama
: pp. 310-314
Self-Powered Active Vibration Control Using Regenerated Vibration Energy
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Kimihiko Nakano, Yoshihiro Suda, and Shigeyuki Nakadai
: pp. 315-320
Assembly Sequence Planning Using Inductive Learning
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Takeshi Murayama, Bungo Takemura and Fuminori Oba
: pp. 321-325
Fruit Harvesting Robotics
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Naoshi Kondo and Mitsuji Monta
: pp. 326-330
Feasibility Study of Fault Diagnostics Using Multiple Neural Networks
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Yukiyasu Shimada and Kazuhiko Suzuki
: pp. 331-335
Noncontact Hold and Transfer Control by a Two-link Robot Arm with a Magnetic Robot Hand
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Hiroyuki Kojima, Osamu Itagaki and Toshio Kobayashi
: pp. 336-341
A Study of the Multipurpose Intelligent Guided Vehicle for Education
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Kouki Yamaji and Shinichiro Kamiya
: pp. 342-348
Motor Driving Control of an X-Y-Z Table Using a Photoelectric Device and Optical Pattern Recognition
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Koki Yamaji and Yoshihisa Muraoka

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Agro-Robotics

Special Issue on Agro-Robotics

: pp. 171-172
Agro-Robotics
Yasushi Hashimoto

The first intelligent agro-robot for tomato harvesting appeared at Tampa, Florida, in 1983. The presentation by Prof. N. Kawamura at the Department of Agricultural Engineering, Kyoto University, strongly impressed participants in the international symposium for agricultural machinery. Since then, several companies have become interested in developing intelligent agro-robots. As the one of the first, Toshiba demonstrated an intelligent robot for mass propagation in the biotechnological process at Exposition for Flowers in Osaka in 1990. In 1990, the IEEE International Workshop on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS’ 90) was held at the Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., in Tsuchiura, Japan, through cosponsorship of the Robotics Society of Japan and SICE, where two agricultural robotics sessions were first organized by Prof. P. Dario, one of the editors of this journal. In 1991, the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) first conducted international workshop on Mathematical and Control Applications in Agriculture and Horticulture at Matsuyama, Japan, featuring a session for agro-robotics presenting several academic cases developed in companies including Toshiba, mentioned above. Several types of intelligent robot were introduced to agricultural applications as agro-robots. Agricultural machinery has a long history, with tractors and combines the main mechanized targets and far from intelligent robot. Highly advanced industrial technology including robots for factory automation widens field applications to new areas in agriculture and agricultural production must consider new labor based on the declining number of farmers in agriculture. New needs of agriculture are being covered by highly advanced engineering-technology developed in manufacturing plants, and it is to be noted that fruitful cooperation has begun in the new field liking industrial and agriculture technology, well demonstrated by the papers in this special issue. The first and second papers, by Tokunaga et al. and by Ogasawara et al., are from the high technology engineering project, Faculty of Engineering, at Kumamoto University, supported from 1994 to 1996 by the Science and Technology Agency, Japan. A watermelon harvesting robot developed as a new target has never been applied in industry. This research is not very important for developing new engineering in robotics and extremely useful in agricultural application. The third and fourth papers, by Noguchi et al. and Yamashita et al., are from engineering in agricultural machinery in interesting research on transportation robots. Prof. Noguchi and his group at the Department of Agricultural Engineering, Hokkaido University, presents a dramatic example of mobile agro-robotics in the field, while Prof. Yamashita, of the Department of Biomechanical Systems, Ehime University, and Prof. Sato developed a vehicle for greenhouse automation anticipating the new agriculture of the 21st century. The fifth paper, by Arima et al., is from agricultural machinery engineering in typical agricultural machinery firms in Japan. The cucumber harvesting robot was developed by ISEKI & Co., Ltd. The sixth paper, by Kobayashi et al., is from the Institute of Agricultural Machinery, BRAIN, and describes a grafting robot. The seventh paper, by Kondo et al., is agricultural machinery engineering involving to the intriguing technology of cutting robots. A chrysanthemum cutting robot is developed for biotechnological applications. Kondo is regarded as an up-and-coming young leader in IFAC activities. The eighth paper, by Dr. Hayashi, is involves agricultural machinery engineering in typical agricultural machinery firms in Japan. It introduces an automatic milking system developed by Kubota Co., Ltd. in cooperation with the Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, The Netherlands (IMAG-DLO). The ninth paper, by Dr. Yamada, involves agricultural machinery engineering in typical agricultural machinery firms in Japan, and introduces a transplanting robot developed by Yanmar Agricultural Equipment Co. Ltd. The final paper in this fascinating series is by Prof. H. Murase, who chairs the Technical Committee on Intelligent Control in Agricultural Automation, IFAC, has encouraged engineering for system control in agricultural applications since 1988, when the first working group for agricultural engineering was set up and chaired by myself. Agro-robotics has been discussed through several international workshop and symposium sponsored by IFAC since then. Note that IFAC is one of the most active international societies in control engineering taking on all problems in any phase involving robotics, as is done by IEEE. Prof. Murase is one of the most active chairmen in the 46 Technical Committees (TCs) and presents the global scope of agro-robotics in IFAC in conclusion, which is expected to be very useful. I thank Prof. A. Shimizu of Ehime University for his important advice and the authors contributing to this issue, especially Profs. T. Inoue and S. Kawaji of the Faculty of Engineering, Kumamoto University, for their kind cooperation in different engineering fields. Last, I thank Editor in Chief, Prof. T. Fukuda, the Deputy Chief Editors, Prof. M. Kaneko, and the Editors for providing this chance to demonstrate advances in agro-robotics in this special issue, which will encourage the development of robotics in ever widening applications.

: pp. 173-182
Algorithm and Design of an Intelligent Digital Integrated Circuit for a Watermelon Harvesting Robot
Abstract
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Yusuke Tokunaga, Toshihide Hakukawa, and Takahiro Inoue
: pp. 183-192
Intelligent Algorithm for Biped Robot for Harvesting Watermelons
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Ken'ichi Ogasawara, Masaki Arao and Shigeyasu Kawaji
: pp. 193-199
Vision Intelligence for Mobile Agro-Robotic System
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Noboru Noguchi, John F. Reid, Qin Zhang, Lei Tian and Al C. Hansen
: pp. 200-207
Automated Vehicles for Greenhouse Automation
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Jun Yamashita and Kazunobu Sato
: pp. 208-212
Cucumber Harvesting Robot and Plant Training System
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Seiichi Arima and Naoshi Kondo
: pp. 213-219
Grafting Robot
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Ken Kobayashi, Masato Suzuki and Sadao Sasaya
: pp. 220-224
Chrysanthemum Cutting Sticking Robot System
Abstract
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Naoshi Kondo and Mitsuji Monta
: pp. 225-226
Automatic Milking System
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Masahiko Hayashi
: pp. 227-230
Development of Transplanting Robot
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Hisaya Yamada
: pp. 231-233
IFAC Commitment on Research and Development in Biorobotics
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Haruhiko Murase

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on Vision

Special Issue on Vision

: p. 87
Vision
Shunichiro Oe

The widely used term Computer Vision applies to when computers are substituted for human visual information processing. As Real-world objects, except for characters, symbols, figures and photographs created by people, are 3-dimensional (3-D), their two-dimensional (2-D) images obtained by camera are produced by compressing 3-D information to 2-D. Many methods of 2-D image processing and pattern recognition have been developed and widely applied to industrial and medical processing, etc. Research work enabling computers to recognize 3-D objects by 3-D information extracted from 2-D images has been carried out in artificial intelligent robotics. Many techniques have been developed and some applied practically in scene analysis or 3-D measurement. These practical applications are based on image sensing, image processing, pattern recognition, image measurement, extraction of 3-D information, and image understanding. New techniques are constantly appearing. The title of this special issue is Vision, and it features 8 papers from basic computer vision theory to industrial applications. These papers include the following: Kohji Kamejima proposes a method to detect self-similarity in random image fields – the basis of human visual processing. Akio Nagasaka et al. developed a way to identify a real scene in real time using run-length encoding of video feature sequences. This technique will become a basis for active video recording and new robotic machine vision. Toshifumi Honda presents a method for visual inspection of solder joint by 3-D image analysis – a very important issue in the inspection of printed circuit boards. Saburo Okada et al. contribute a new technique on simultaneous measurement of shape and normal vector for specular objects. These methods are all useful for obtaining 3-D information. Masato Nakajima presents a human face identification method for security monitoring using 3-D gray-level information. Kenji Terada et al. propose a method of automatic counting passing people using image sensing. These two technologies are very useful in access control. Yoji. Ogawa presents a new image processing method for automatic welding in turbid water under a non-preparatory environment. Liu Wei et al. develop a method for detection and management of cutting-tool wear using visual sensors. We are certain that all of these papers will contribute greatly to the development of vision systems in robotics and mechatronics.

: pp. 88-97
Stochastic-Computational Approach to Self-Similarity Detection in Random Image Fields
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Kohji Kamejima
: pp. 98-103
Real-time Scene Identification Using Run-length Encoding of Video Feature Sequences
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Akio Nagasaka and Takafumi Miyatake
: pp. 104-111
Automated Visual Inspection for Solder Joints of PCB Based on 3-D Image Analysis
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Toshifumi Honda, Hisae Yamamura, Mineo Nomoto, Takanori Ninomiya, Tomoharu Horii and Yoshio Miyawaki
: pp. 112-116
Development of Simultaneous Measurement of 3-D Shapes and Normal Vectors for Specular Objects
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Saburo Okada, Masaaki Imade and Hidekazu Miyauchi
: pp. 117-122
Face Identification by FG Sensor
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Masato Nakajima
: pp. 123-128
Counting Passers-by Using a Color Camera
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Kenji Terada, Takumi Ando and Jun'ichiro Yamaguchi
: pp. 129-134
Image Processing for Automatic Welding in Turbid Water
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Yoji Ogawa
: pp. 135-139
Cutting Tool Wear Detection and Tool Management Using Visual Sensors
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Liu Wei, Akira Ishii and Seiji Hata
: pp. 140-147
Servocontrol of a Mobile Robot by Using Genetic Algorithms
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Jun Tang, Keigo Watanabe and Katsutoshi Kuribayashi
: pp. 148-152
Study of Motion Monitoring Using an Accelerometer – Unrestrained Measurement –
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Hisaya Tanaka, Akihiro Nakata and Hideto Ide
: pp. 153-164
Evolutionary Collision Free Optimal Trajectory Planning for Mobile Robots
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M.M.A. Hashem, Keigo Watanabe and Kiyotaka Izumi
: pp. 165-170
Mobile Robot Architecture in Intelligent Space
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Joo-Ho Lee, Noriaki Ando and Hideki Hashimoto

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Mobile Robot

Special Issue on Mobile Robot

: p. 1
Mobile Robot
Kiyoshi Komoriya

Mobility, or locomotion, is as important a function for robots as manipulation. A robot can enlarge its work space by locomotion. It can also recognize its environment well with its sensors by moving around and by observing its surroundings from various directions. Much researches has been done on mobile robots and the research appears to be mature. Research activity on robot mobility is still very active; for example, 22% of the sessions at ICRA’98 – the International Conference on Robotics and Automation – and 24% of the sessions at IROS’98 – the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems – dealt with issues directly related to mobile robots. One of the main reasons may be that intelligent mobile robots are thought to be the closest position to autonomous robot applications. This special issue focuses on a variety of mobile robot research from mobile mechanisms, localization, and navigation to remote control through networks. The first paper, entitled “Control of an Omnidirectional Vehicle with Multiple Modular Steerable Drive Wheels,” by M. Hashimoto et al., deals with locomotion mechanisms. They propose an omnidirectional mobile mechanism consisting of modular steerable drive wheels. The omnidirectional function of mobile mechanisms will be an important part of the human-friendly robot in the near future to realize flexible movements in indoor environments. The next three papers focus on audiovisual sensing to localize and navigate a robot. The second paper, entitled “High-Speed Measurement of Normal Wall Direction by Ultrasonic Sensor,” by A. Ohya et al., proposes a method to measure the normal direction of walls by ultrasonic array sensor. The third paper, entitled “Self-Position Detection System Using a Visual-Sensor for Mobile Robots,” is written by T. Tanaka et al. In their method, the position of the robot is decided by measuring marks such as name plates and fire alarm lamps by visual sensor. In the fourth paper, entitled “Development of Ultra-Wide-Angle Laser Range Sensor and Navigation of a Mobile Robot in a Corridor Environment,” written by Y Ando et al., a very wide view-angle sensor is realized using 5 laser fan beam projectors and 3 CCD cameras. The next three papers discussing navigation problems. The fifth paper, entitled “Autonomous Navigation of an Intelligent Vehicle Using 1-Dimensional Optical Flow,” by M. Yamada and K. Nakazawa, discusses navigation based on visual feedback. In this work, navigation is realized by general and qualitative knowledge of the environment. The sixth paper, entitled “Development of Sensor-Based Navigation for Mobile Robots Using Target Direction Sensor,” by M. Yamamoto et al., proposes a new sensor-based navigation algorithm in an unknown obstacle environment. The seventh paper, entitled “Navigation Based on Vision and DGPS Information for Mobile Robots,” S. Kotani et al., describes a navigation system for an autonomous mobile robot in an outdoor environment. The unique point of their paper is the utilization of landmarks and a differential global positioning system to determine robot position and orientation. The last paper deals with the relationship between the mobile robot and computer networks. The paper, entitled “Direct Mobile Robot Teleoperation via Internet,” by K. Kawabata et al., proposes direct teleoperation of a mobile robot via the Internet. Such network-based robotics will be an important field in robotics application. We sincerely thank all of the contributors to this special issue for their cooperation from the planning stage to the review process. Many thanks also go to the reviewers for their excellent work. We will be most happy if this issue aids readers in understanding recent trends in mobile robot research and furthers interest in this research field.

: pp. 2-12
Control of an Omnidirectional Vehicle with Multiple Modular Steerable Drive Wheels
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Masafumi Hashimoto, Fuminori Oba and Toru Eguchi
: pp. 13-16
High-Speed Measurement of Normal Wall Direction by Ultrasonic Sensor
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Akihisa Ohya, Yoshiaki Nagashima and Shin’ichi Yuta
: pp. 17-24
Self-Position Detection System Using a Visual-Sensor for Mobile Robots
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Takayuki Tanaka, Yasunori Yamazaki, Hiroki Watanabe, Takeshi Katae and Kazuo Yamafuji
: pp. 25-32
Development of Ultra-Wide-Angle Laser Range Sensor and Navigation of a Mobile Robot in a Corridor Environment
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Yoshinobu Ando, Takashi Tsubouchi and Shin’ichi Yuta
: pp. 33-38
Autonomous Navigation of an Intelligent Vehicle Using 1-Dimensional Optical Flow
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Masaki Yamada and Kazuo Nakazawa
: pp. 39-44
Development of Sensor-Based Navigation for Mobile Robots Using Target Direction Sensor
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Motoji Yamamoto, Nobuhiro Ushimi, and Akira Mohri
: pp. 45-53
Navigation Based on Vision and DGPS Information for Mobile Robots
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Shinji Kotani, Ken’ichi Kaneko, Tatsuya Shinoda and Hideo Mori
: pp. 54-59
Direct Mobile Robot Teleoperation via Internet
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Kuniaki Kawabata, Takeshi Sekine, Tatsuya Ishikawa, Hajime Asama and Isao Endo
: pp. 60-66
Impedance Control Using Anisotropic Fuzzy Environment Models
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Fusaomi Nagata, Keigo Watanabe, Kazuya Sato and Kiyotaka Izumi
: pp. 67-71
Analyzing a Robotized Workcell to Enhance Robot’s Operation
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Marco Ceccarelli
: pp. 72-77
Adaptive Formation Plays in Simulated Soccer Game Based on Pheromon as Communication Media and Reward Resources
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Masao Kubo, Sadayoshi Mikami, Yukinori Kakazu and Mitsuo Wada
: pp. 78-85
Development of Mobile Robot Elevator Utility System
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Kazuhiro Mima, Masahiro Endou, Aiguo Ming, Chisato Kanamori and Makoto Kajitani

Vol.10 (1998)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Analysis and Simulation Systems for Robotics and Mechatronics

Special Issue on Analysis and Simulation Systems for Robotics and Mechatronics

: p. 463
Analysis and Simulation Systems for Robotics and Mechatronics
Haruhisa Kawasaki

Superior analysis and simulation systems play an important part in robotics and mechatronics R&D. Developing apparatuses involves repeating planning, trial manufacture, experiments, analysis, and improvement. Simulation and analysis are now executed before trial manufacture, decreasing the number of trial manufacture, shortening development, and cutting development cost. Virtual reality is often applied to simulation, and commercialization without trial manufactures will eventually be possible. Most commercialized simulation software are being improved for general use based on software made by researchers because existing analysis and simulation do not function sufficiently and researchers are often required to develop their own analysis and simulation. Simulation developed for research thus may be used by many technical experts and researchers in the future. This special issue introduces seven reports on basic mechanism analysis developed to survey simulation research. Michisuke Jo et al. developed a mechanism kinetic analysis Motor Drive using FORTRAN and MATLAB. This article, entitled Kinematic Analysis of Mechanisms Using Motor Algebra and Graph Theory, considers kinematic analysis method using the latest drive version. Haruhisa Kawasaki et al. are developing robot analysis ROSAM II using C and Maple V. This article, entitled Symbolic Analysis of Robot Base Parameter Set Using Grobner-Basis, considers base parameter analysis of general robots with closed links. Hajime Morikawa et al. developed a robot simulator kinematically simulated by connecting graphic icons. This article, entitled Network-Based Robot Simulator Using Hierarchical Graphic Icons, considers construction of a robot simulator, kinetic analysis of multiple robot arms, dynamic analysis of forest trimmers, and an example applying remote control to space robots. Shigeki Toyama et al. developed general-use mechanism analysis simulator AI MOTION. This article, entitled Dynamic Autonomous Car Mobile Analysis Simulating Mechanical Systems Analysis, considers an autonomous car travel simulator dynamically modeling tires combined into AI MOTION. The simulator analyzes the connection of tire rigidity, car width, caster radius, and motion performance. Takayoshi Muto et al. developed dynamic behavior simulator BDSP for hydraulic systems. This article, entitled Software Package BDSP Developed to Simulate Hydraulic Systems, considers construction of BDSP that analyzes hydraulic systems using easy block diagrams. The simulator analyzes fluid line, nonlinear elements, and discrete time control. Shinichi Nakajima et al. developed a two-dimensional jaw movement simulator for clarifying the function of muscles in lower jaw motion. This article, entitled Development of 2-D Jaw Movement Simulator(JSN/SI), considers hardware and a control system for chewing food at a required force. Yoshiyuki Sankai et al., in Robot Objective Parallel Calculation and Real-time Control Using a Digital Signal Processor, consider parallel distributed and realtime control by DSP for constructing control in an actual robot. This issue discussed analysis and simulation developed for robotics and mechatronics R&D. Most systems are applicable to general-purpose situations. We hope this issue helps deepen the understanding of the status and applications of simulation research in mechatronics and promotes further development in the field.

: pp. 464-474
Kinematic Analysis of Mechanisms Using Motor Algebra and Graph Theory
Abstract
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Michisuke Jo and Tomoyoshi Sasaki
: pp. 475-481
Symbolic Analysis of Robot Base Parameter Set Using Grobner-Basis
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Harushisa Kawasaki and Toshimi Shimizu
: pp. 482-487
Network-Based Robot Simulator Using Hierarchical Graphic Icons
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Hajime Morikawa and Nobuaki Takanashi
: pp. 488-493
Dynamic Autonomous Car Mobile Analysis Simulating Mechanical Systems Analysis – First Dynamic Characteristics of Running Mouse –
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Shigeki Toyama and Yasuo Murakuki
: pp. 494-498
Software Package BDSP Developed to Simulate Hydraulic Systems
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Takayoshi Muto, Junji Fukumori, Akio Seko and Hironao Yamada
: pp. 499-504
Development of 2-D Jaw Movement Simulator (JSN/S1)
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Shin-ichi Nakajima, Toyohiko Hayashi and Hiroshi Kobayashi
: pp. 505-514
Robot Objective Parallel Calculation and Real-time Control Using a Digital Signal Processor
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Yoshiyuki Sankai, Tetsuya Nii and Shinichi Kariya
: pp. 515-520
Sketching for Porcelain Using Image Processing
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Kazuhiko Shiranita, Kenichiro Hayashi and Akifumi Otsubo
: pp. 521-527
Evaluation of Picture-taking System for Railway Vision
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Hiroshi Sasama
: pp. 528-532
Optopneumatic Interface for Controlling Pneumatic Power Circuits
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Guido Belforte and Gabriella Eula
: pp. 533-537
Device Developed to Measure Drive Roller
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Hisaya Tanaka, Nobuyuki Sudo and Hideto Ide
: pp. 538-541
Unattended Production Based on Cooperation between Offline and Online Robots
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Hong-Zhi Yang, Kazuo Yamafuji, Kouichiro Arita and Naoki Ohara

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Complex Systems in Robotics (2)

Special Issue on Complex Systems in Robotics (2)

: pp. 377-386
Mobile Operations Performed by Mobile Manipulators on Irregular Terrain – Torque Compensation Using Neural Networks for Disturbance Torques Produced by Irregular Terrain –
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Mamoru Minami, Masatoshi Hatano and Toshiyuki Asakura
: pp. 387-393
Acquiring Behavioral Rules for Action-Based Robot Environments
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Koji Yamada, Satoshi Endo and Hayao Miyagi
: pp. 394-399
Applying Vibrational Potential Method to Shop Scheduling Problems
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Ibrahim Kebbe, Hiroshi Yokoi and Yukinori Kakazu
: pp. 400-406
Multilegged Vehicle Using Multireactive Agent
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Kensuke Takita, Hiroshi Yokoi and Yukinori Kakazu
: pp. 407-412
Navigation for a Behavior-Based Autonomous Mobile Robot
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Kazumi Oikawa and Takeshi Tsuchiya
: pp. 413-417
Autonomous Vehicle Navigation Behavior Generation by Reinforcement Learning
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Keitaro Naruse and Yukinori Kakazu and Ming C. Leu
: pp. 418-423
A Framework for Evolution of Computer Systems on the Fly
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Norberto Eiji Nawa and Takeshi Furuhashi
: pp. 424-430
Chaotic Evolutionary Parallel Computation on Intelligent Agents
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Naoki Kohata, Toru Yamaguchi, Takanobu Baba and Hideki Hashimoto
: pp. 431-438
GA-Based Q-CMAC Applied to Airship Evasion Problem
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Yuka Akisato, Keiji Suzuki, and Azuma Ohuchi
: pp. 439-444
Self-Tuning Neuro-PID for Stabilization of Double Inverted Pendulum
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Yoshiyuki Kishida, Sigeru Omatu and Michifumi Yoshioka
: pp. 445-449
Consideration of Local Wind Energy
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Kouki Yamaji, Takaaki Hashimoto, Shoushi Inoue, and Yutaka Konishi
: pp. 450-454
Deformation of Windmill Support and Operation
Abstract
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Kouki Yamaji, Shoushi Inoue, Terumi Yamamoto, Yutaka Konishi and Takaaki Hashimoto
: pp. 455-461
Evaluation of Slit Light System for Objects with Metallic Reflection and Application to Iron Wheels
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Hiroshi Sasama

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Complex Systems in Robotics (1)

Special Issue on Complex Systems in Robotics (1)

: p. 283
Complex Systems in Robotics
Sadayoshi Mikami, and Mitsuo Wada

The Really “intelligent” robots predicted by science fiction have yet to appear, and robotics research seems to have reached a wall in dealing with the real-world environment. The robot is a unique device that it interfaces directly with the environments, including humans, machines, and nature. The world is very complex and changes dynamically. Robotic research must thus consider how to deal with such dynamcal complex world by means of machines. Our special issues on the complex systems in robotics introduce current representative approaches and attempts to answer these questions. The approach from a complex system point of view deals with new directions in robotics, for the above reasons and provides ways to view things dynamically, in a way that goes beyond traditional static control laws and rules. As these issues show approaches are divergent and ongoing. Modeling and forecasting the world is not haphazard. If requires direction. Even robots that navigate traffic, for example, must have a model to forecast unknown dynamics. Human interfacing requires far more difficult approaches than we take now. Recent developments in theory of chaos and non-linear predictions are expected to provide ways to enable these approaches. Robot interaction with the environment is one of the fundamental characteristics robots, and any interaction incorporates underlying dynamics; even robot-to-robot interaction exhibits deterministic dynamics. We will see how to deal with such complex phenomena through the articles predicting chaotic time series in these issues. Very rapid adaptation to the world is another way of coping using a brute-force approach. Reinforcement learning is a promising tool for working in a complex unknown environment. Learning robots affect both their environment and other robots. This is the situation in which we must think of the emergence of complexity. This may provide a rich source of possible tasks, and we must consider its dynamic nature of it. Many interesting phenomena are shown in the papers we present, applying reinforcement learning in multi-robots, for example. Finding good solutions wherever possible is a rather static solution but must incorporate the mechanism of how nature generates complexities and rich variations. Evolutionary methods, which many papers deal with in this issue, involves trends in complex systems sciences. Robotics applications must consider practical achievements such as rapidity, robustness, and appropriateness for specific applications. These issues provide a variety of robots and automation problems. Of course there are lots of other ways for this quite new approach and it should be worth cultivating because it is just the way we expect that robots should go. These special issues are organized from many papers submitted by researchers, all of whom we thank for their contributions. We hope these issues will help readers to familiarize themselves with the many trends in researches beyond engineering approaches and treat their practical implementation. This area is now very active, and we hope to see many papers related to this theme submitted to this journal in future.

: pp. 284-288
Generation Method of Evaluation for a Robot Considering Relations with Other Robots
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Kazuya Ohkawa, Takanori Shibata and Kazuo Tanie
: pp. 289-294
TD Learning with Neural Networks
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Norio Baba
: pp. 295-300
Position Estimation of Vehicle Using GPS Data and Internal Sensor Data
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Toshihiro Aono
: pp. 301-304
Chaotic Short-Term Prediction to Water Flow into Hydroelectric Power Stations
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Masaya Koyama and Tadashi lokibe
: pp. 305-310
Chaos Universal Learning Network Clustering Control
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Kotaro Hirasawa, Junichiro Misawa, Jinglu Hu, Junichi Murata, Masanao Ohbayashi and Yurio Eki
: pp. 311-314
Robotic Mind -Subjectivity & Objectivity-
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Tetsuro Yabuta
: pp. 315-325
Set Representation Using Schemata and its Constructing Method from Population in GA
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Naohiko Hanajima, Mitsuhisa Yamashita and Hiromitsu Hikita
: pp. 326-332
Autonomous Mobile Robot Behavior Control Using Immune Network
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Yuji Watanabe, Akio Ishiguro and Yoshiki Uchikawa
: pp. 333-337
Kinematic Description of Self-Organized Leg Motion Transition in Human Locomotion Learning
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Takashi Yokoi, Akihiko Takahashi and Tomohiro Kizuka
: pp. 338-349
Sensory Network for Mobile Robotic Systems with Structured Intelligence
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Naoyuki Kubota and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 350-357
Logistic Chaos Protects Evolution against Environment Noise
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Masao Kubo, Akihiro Yamaguchi, Sadayoshi Mikami and Mitsuo Wada
: pp. 358-363
Velocity Measurement for Planar Motions of Machines Using the LM Measuring Device
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Hua Qiu
: pp. 364-369
Collision-Free Trajectory Planning for a Two-Dimensional Mobile Robot by Optimizing Continuous Curves
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Hiroaki Ozaki and Chang-jun Lin
: pp. 370-376
Design Analysis of a Pneumatic Force Control Servosystem with Pressure Proportional Valve
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Massimo Sorli and Alessandro Vigliani

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Handling of Flexible Object

Special Issue on Handling of Flexible Object

: pp. 167-169
Handling of Flexible Object
Masaru Nakazawa

It is difficult to introduce highly versatile automation using robots to handling deformable objects such as thread, cloth, wire, long beams, and thin plates in plant production processes, compared to the handling of rigid objects. Office equipment handles deformable objects such as paper and plastic. Problems unique to these objects is caused by speeding up such equipment and demand for upgrading its accuracy. In agriculture and medical care, automatic, intelligent handling of deformable objects such as fruit and animals has long been desired and practical systems sought. Deformable objects whose handling should be versatiley and accurately automated are classified into two groups based on handling: (A) Flexible, mostly thin, fine objects capable of elastic deformation (B) Soft objects easily crushed, such as soft fruits or animals The problem in handling the first group is controlling object deformation of an infinite degree of freedom with a finite number of manipulated variables. In contrast, a significant problem in handling the second group is often how to handle them without exerting excessive stress and how to handle them safely and reliably. The handling of these two groups differ greatly in mechanics and control theory, and this special issue focuses on the first group — flexible objects — mechanical collection and transport studies, control, and software. Recent studies on their handling are classified into four groups for convenience based on handled objects and types of handling task: (a) Control of deformation, internal force, and vibration or path planning of flexible objects (mainly thin plates and beams) using single or multiple manipulators. (b) Task understanding in insertion of elastic into rigid parts and vice versa, and the study of human skills to help robots accomplish these task. (c) Approaches on improved accuracy, intelligent control, and vibration damping in handling and transfer of sheets and strings with low flexural rigidity, represented by paper or wire. (d) Strategies for grasping and unfolding sheets such as cloth whose flexural rigidity is almost nil. For (a), studies are active on deformation control by two robot hands attempting to grasp cloth. 1-3) In the automobile industry, so-called flexible fixtureless assembly systems are advancing in which two robots process or assemble parts in mid-air without a fixed table to reduce lead time and cost. These systems are mostly developed assuming handled parts are rigid. Nguyen et al. work assuming parts such as sheet metal whose deformation must be taken into consideration.1) Nakagaki et al. propose form estimation that considers even plastic deformation in wire handling by robots, in connection with the development of robots for electric wire installation.4) Many studies cover flexible wire as elastic beams,3-9) but comparatively few focus on bending deformation of thin plates. This special edition includes a paper by Kosuge et al. on thin-plate deformation control. Vibration control of grasped objects becomes important as speed increases. Matsuno kindly contributed his paper on optimum path planning in elastic plate handling. In controlling the deformation of elastic bodies, the mechanics of objects handled is often unknown. This special issue features a paper by Kojima et al. on an approach to this problem by adaptive feed-forward control. For (b), we consider three cases: (1) A cylindrical rigid body inserted into a hole on an elastic plate. (2) An elastic bar inserted into a hole on a rigid body. (3) A tubular elastic body put on a cylindrical rigid body. This special issue carries papers on these problems by Brata et al., Matsuno et al., and Hirai. For (2), a paper by Nakagaki et al.10) covers electric wire installation. For (3), the paper by Shima et al.11) covers insertion of a rigid axis into an elastic hose. Robot skill acquisition is an important issue in robotics in general, and the above papers should prove highly interesting and information because they treat studies by comparing robot and human skills in accomplishing work and acquiring concrete skills knowledge. For (c), attempts are made to theoretically analyze sheet handling mechanisms and control developed based on trial and error, and to structure design theory based on such analysis. These attempts are related to the increased accuracy and speed and enhanced intelligence of sheet-handling office automation equipment such as printers, facsimile machines, copiers, and automated teller machines. Yoshida et al. conducted a series of studies on the effects of guides forming paper feed paths and of inertia force of paper by approximating sheets with a chain of discrete masses and springs.12-14) This special edition also features a study on sheet sticking and jamming. Okuna et al. handles a system of similar nature, mechanical studying the form of paper guides.15) Introducing mechanisms to control the positioning of sheets is effective in raising sheet transfer accuracy. Feedback control that regulates feed roller skew angle as a manipulated variable is proposed.16) Increased reliability in separating single sheets from stacked effectively reduces the malfunction rate in sheet-handling equipment. Ways of optimizing the form of sheet-separation rollers17) and estimating frictional force between separation gates and sheets 18) are also proposed. This special issue contains a proposal by Nakazawa et al. of a mechanism that uses reactive sheet buckling force, made in connection with development of a newspaper page turner for the disabled as technology for separating single sheets. Dry frictional force is most widely used for transporting sheets, but is not stable and may even act as an obstacle to improving accuracy. Niino et al. propose a sheet transfer mechanism that uses electrostatic force.19) For improving the accuracy of flexible wire transmission, this special issue carries a study on transporting flexible thin wire through tension control at multiple points, from a study by Morimitsu et al. on optical fiber installation. The thickness of wire used in equipment is becoming increasingly slim and flexible, along with the equipment it is used in. Tension control in the production process is an important factor in the manufacture of such thin wire. Production efficiency constantly calls for increased transfer speed. It has thus become important to estimate air resistance and inertia and to measure and control the tension of running wire. Studies20,21) by Batra, Fraser, et al. which deal the motion of string in the spinning process provide good examples for learning analytical techniques for air drag and inertia. In string vibration where inertia dominates, attempts are made to control vibration by boundary shaking22,23) and feed-forward/back control.24) For (d), highly versatile robots for handling cloth are being developed, and the software technology for automatic cloth selection and unfolding by robot hands is a popular topic.25-27) Ono et al. comment on the nature of problems in developing intelligent systems for handling cloth and similar objects whose bending rigidity is low and which readily fold and overlap—a paper that will prove a good reference in basic approaches in this field. Mechanical analyses are indispensable to studies on (a) through (c). In contrast, information technology such as characteristic variable measurement, image processing, and discrimination, rather than mechanical analyses, play an important roles in studies on (d). This special issue features a study by Hamashima, Uraya et al. on cloth unfolding as an example of such studies. Studies up to now largely assumed that properties of grasped objects did not change environmental influences such as temperature and humidity. Such influence is often, however, a major factor in handling fiber thread and cloth. This special issue has a paper contributed by Taylor, who studies handling method to prevent influence by such environmental factors. The objective of this special issue will have been achieved if it aids those studying the handling of flexible objects by providing approaches and methodologies of researchers whose target objects differ and if it aids those planning to take up study in this field by providing a general view of this field. References: 1) Nguyen, W. and Mills, J., “Multi-Robot Control For Plexible Fixtureless Assembly of Flexible Sheet Metal Auto Body Parts,” Proceedings of the 1996 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2340-2345, (1996). 2) Sun, D. and Shi, X. and Liu, Y., “Modeling and Cooperation of Two-Arm Robotic System Manipulating a Deformable Object,” Proceedings of the 1996 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2346-2351, (1996). 3) Kosuge, K., Sakaki, M., Kanitani, K., Yoshida, H. and Fukuda, T., “Manipulation of a Flexible Object by Dual Manipulators,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 318-323, (1995). 4) Nakagaki, H., Kitagaki, K., Ogasawara, T. and Tukune H., “Handling of a Flexible Wire -Detecting a Deformed Shape of the Wire by Vision and a Force Sensor,” Annual Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’96), 207-210, (1996). 5) Wakamatsu, H., Hirai, S. and Iwata, K., “Static Analysis of Deformable Object Grasping Based on Bounded Force Closure,” Trans. of JSML, 84-618 (C), 508-515, (1998). 6) Katoh, R. and Fujmoto, T., “Study on Deformation of Elastic Object By Manipulator -Path Planning of End -Effector-,” J. of the Robotics Society of Japan, 13-1, 157-160, (1995). 7) Yukawa, T., Uohiyama, M. and Inooka, M., “Stability of Control System in Handling a Flexible Object by Rigid Arm Robots,” JSME Annual Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’95), 169-172, (1995). 8) Yukawa, T., Uohiyama, M. and Cbinata, G., “Handling of a Vibrating Flexible Structure by a Robot,” Trans. JSME, 61-583, 938-943, (1995). 9) Sun, D. and Liu, Y., “Modeling and Impedance Control of a Two-Manipulator System Handling a Flexible Beam,” Trans. of the ASME, 119, 736-742, (1997). 10) Nakagaki, H., Kitagaki, K. and Tukune, H., “Contact Motion in Inserting a Flexible Wire into a Hole,” Annual Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’95), 175-178, (1995). 11) Shimaji, S., Brata, A. and Hattori, H., “Robot Skill in Assembling a Cylinder into an Elastic Hose,” Annual Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ROBOMEC’95), 752-755, (1995). 12) Yoshida, K. and Kawauchi, M., “The Analysis of Deformation and Behavior of Flexible Materials (1st Reprt, Study of Spring-Mass Beam Model of the Sheet,” Trans. of JSME, 58-552, 1474-1480, (1992). 13) Yoshida, K., “Analysis of Deformation and Behavior of Flexible Materials (2nd Report, Static Analysis for Deformation of the Sheet in the Space Formed by Guide Plates),” Trans. JSME, 60-570, 501-507, (1994). 14) Yoshida, K., “Dynamic Analysis of Sheet Defofmation Using Spring-Mass-Beam Model,” Trans. JSME, 63-615, 3926-3932 (1997). 15) Okuna, K., Nishigaito, T. and Shina, Y., “Analysis of Paper Deformation Considering Guide Friction (Improvement of Paper Path for Paper-Feeding Mechanism),” Trans. JSME, 60-575, 2279-2284, (1994). 16) Fujimura, H. and Ono, K., “Analysis of Paper Motion Driven by Skew-Roll Paper Feeding System,” Trans. JSME, 62-596, 1354-1360, (1996). 17) Shima, Y., Hattori, S., Kobayashi, Y. and Ukai, M., “Optimum of Gate-Roller Shape in Paper Isolating Methods,” Conference of Information, Intelligence and Precision Equipment (IIP’96), 61-62, (1996). 18) Suzuki, Y, Hattori, S., Shima, Y. and Ukai, M., “Contact Analysis of Paper in Gate-Roller Handling Method”, Conference on Information, Intelligence and Precision Equipment (IIP’95), 19-20, (1995). 19) Niino, T., Egawa, S. and Higuchi, T., “An Electrostatic Paper Feeder,” J. of the Japan Society for Precision Engineering, 60-12,1761-1765, (1994). 20) Batra, S., Ghosh, T. and Zeidman, M., “An Integrated Approach to Dynamic Analysis of the Ring Spinning Process , PartII: With Air Drag,” Textile Research Journal, 59, 416-424, (1989). 21) Fraser, W., Ghosh, T. and Batra, S., “On Unwinding Yarn from a Cylindrical Package,” Proceedings of Royal Society of London, A, 436, 479-438, (1992). 22) Jacob, S., “Control of Vibrating String Using Impedance Matching,” Proceedings of the American Control Conference (San Francisco),468-472, (1993). 23) Lee, S. and Mote, C., “Vibration Control of an Axially Moving String by Boundary Control,” Trans. of the ASME, J. of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, 118, 66-74, (1996). 24) Ying, S. and Tan, C., “Active Vibration Control of the Axially Moving String Using Space Feedforward and Feedback Controllers,” Trans. ASME, J. of Vibration and Acoustics, 118, 306-312, (1996). 25) Ono, E., Ichijo, H. and Aisaka, N., “Flexible Robotic Hand for Handling Fabric Pieces in Garment Manufacture,” International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, 4-5,18-23, (1992). 26) Paraschidis, K., Fahantidis, N, Petridis, V., Doulgeri, Z., Petrou, L. and Hasapis, G, “A Robotic System for Handling Textile and Non Rigid Flat Materials,” Computers in Industry, 26, 303-313, (1995). 27) Fahantidis, N., Paraschidis, K, Petridis, V., Doulgeri, Z., Petrou, L. and Hasapis, G., “Robot Handling of Flat Textile Materials,” IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine, 4-1, 34-41, (1997).

: pp. 170-177
Manipulation of Sheet Metal by Multiple Robots
Abstract
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Kazuhiro Kosuge, Hidehiro Yoshida, Toshio Fukuda, Kiyoshi Kanitani and Masaru Sakai
: pp. 178-183
Optimal Path Planning for Flexible Plate Handling Using an n-Link Manipulator
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Fumitoshi Matsuno
: pp. 184-190
Deformation Control of Elastic Object by Robot Arm – High-Precision Deformation Control by Adaptive Feed-forward Control –
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Hiroyuki Kojima, Masakazu Kamei and Tsuneo Akuto
: pp. 191-196
Cylinder Insertion into Hole of Flexible Rubber Plate – Insertion Force Related to Position and Posture of Cylinder –
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Akas Sureng Brata, Keiji Sasaki and Shigeyuki Shimachi
: pp. 197-202
Cylinder Insertion into Hole of Flexible Rubber Plate – Path Search for Local Minimum Insertion Force by Shifting Fitted Zone Regression –
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Keiji Sasaki, Akas Sureng Brata and Shigeyuki Shimachi
: pp. 203-208
Task Understanding for the Beam-in-Hole Task with Initial One-Point Contact
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Fumitoshi Matsuno and Motohiro Kisoi
: pp. 209-213
Transferring Human Motion to Mechanical Manipulator in Insertion of Deformable Tubes
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Shinichi Hirai
: pp. 214-220
Sheet Sticking and Jamming Caused by Creases and Curling
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Kazushi Yoshida, Noriaki Hagiwara and Masaaki Aida
: pp. 221-228
Study on Single Sheet Separation from Stacked Flexible Sheets
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Masaru Nakazawa, Takashi Kawamura and Hirotaka Ishikawa
: pp. 229-234
Long-Distance Optical Fiber Cable Installation System Using Automatic Control Puller
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Takenori Morimitsu and Masao Terasawa
: pp. 235-243
Unfolding Folded Fabric Using Outline Information with Vision and Touch Sensors
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Eiichi Ono, Nobuyuki Kita and Shigeyuki Sakane
: pp. 244-251
Planning Strategy for Task Untangling Laundry – Isolating Clothes from a Washed Mass –
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Kyoko Hamajima and Masayoshi Kakikura
: pp. 252-257
Service Robot for Housekeeping – Clothing Handling –
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Takashi Kabaya and Masayoshi Kakikura
: pp. 258-263
The Influence of Environmental Conditions on Automated Fabric Handling
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Paul M. Taylor, Didier M. Pollet and Paul J. W. Abbott
: pp. 266-271
Emotion Analysis using FST
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Hisaya Tanaka, Hideto Ide and Yuji Nagashima
: pp. 272-277
Trajectory Tracking Control of a Flexible Mobile Robot using Disturbance Observer
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Hiroyuki Kojima, Toshihilo Hashimoto and Sadao Shimoyama
: pp. 278-282
Development of Oxygen Sensor Using Fiber-optics Coupler
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Eiji Toba, Masahiro Ichikawa, Junji Kazama, Toyonori Nishimatsu and Hiroaki Aizawa

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on Robotics and Mechatronics for Fusion Experimental Reactor (ITER)

Special Issue on Robotics and Mechatronics for Fusion Experimental Reactor (ITER)

: pp. 69-70
Robotics and Mechatronics for Fusion Experimental Reactor (ITER)
Eisuke Tada

Engineering design activities (EDA) demonstrating the science and technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), are being conducted based on the four-party international collaboration of Japan (JA), the U.S.A (US), Europe (EU), and Russia (RF). EDA basically concerns engineering design required for ITER construction and technical development confirming design feasibility. In engineering R&D design, the central role is being played by an International Joint Design Team (JCT) consisting of scientists and engineers from the four parties, conducting work on detailed component design, buildings and plant facilities design, safety analysis and evaluation, and comprehensive overall system design. In engineering R&D, whose final objective is to demonstrate engineering technology necessary for ITER construction, a wide variety of technical development ranging from data acquisition on material characteristics to verification of system performance is being conducted through equal participation of the four parties. Because of the importance of principal ITER components, such as superconducting coils, vacuum vessel, in-vessel components such as diverters and blankets, and remote maintenance equipment, a large-scale project has been set up for manufacturing prototypes, including full-scale models, and for demonstrating performance. In-vessel components such as blankets and divertors are exposed radioactivity of 14 MeV neutrons due to DT operation, and therefore must be maintained or replaced remotely. Plansbased on stage-by-stage ITER operation call for shielding blankets to be replaced by blankets for breeding tritium. Diverters require scheduled maintenance and replacement because they are subjected to severe plasma heat and particle loads. For in-vessel components that undergo scheduled maintenance, remote maintenance is an important technical issue that may affect the performance of ITER, so component structures and layout consistent with remote handling receive top priority and will be subjected to remote maintenance demonstration-testing of using full-scale models. Remote ITER maintenance focuses on technologies involving radiation-hard devices designed for a gamma radiation environment, remote operation and metrology and control for precisely handling heavy in-vessel payloads, and welding and cutting and inspection in narrow confines. Thus, use must be made of robot technologies in Japan and a design concept conceived that meets unique ITER needs. Because device handling precision, the working environment, and other factors surpass conventional technical levels, technical data on large-scale tokamaks, experience in handling heavy payloads in industry, and nuclear field environmental resistance must be studied and system development, including technical demonstrations, conducted on a full engineering scale. This is the backer of ITER device design and development. Good prospects exist for developing a large number of remote maintenance equipment satisfying ITER specifications through the development of a new remote maintenance concept that calls for the handling of heavy payloads with high precision, the acquisition of technical data confirming concept feasibility, the development of components having 2 to 3 times higher resistance to radiation than anything available previously, and the development of remote maintenance based tools that cut, weld, and inspect in narrow confines. In final development, steady progress is being made in fabricating, testing, and demonstrating full-scale remote maintenance. This Special Issue summarizes these achievements and provides an overview of the remote maintenance design on in-vessel components, introducing current status and plans on remote maintenance technology in which the Japan Home Teams is engaged in. Topics covered include the following: 1. Remote Maintenance Development for ITER 2. Blanket Remote Maintenance Development 3. Diverter Remote Maintenance Development 4. In-Vessel Metrology and Viewing Development 5. Pipe Welding and Cutting Tool Development 6. Pipe Inspection Tool Development 7. Thick-Plate Welding and Cutting Tool Development 8. Radiation-Hard Component Development 9. Standard Component Development 10. Data Acquisition and Control

: pp. 71-77
Remote Maintenance Development for ITER
Abstract
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Eisuke Tada and Kiyoshi Shibanuma
: pp. 78-87
Development of Blanket Remote Maintenance System
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Satoshi Kakudate, Masataka Nakahira, Kiyoshi Oka and Kou Taguchi
: pp. 88-95
Development of Divertor Remote Maintenance System
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Nobukazu Takeda, Kiyoshi Oka, Kentaro Akou and Yuji Takiguchi
: pp. 96-103
Development of ITER In-Vessel Viewing and Metrology Systems
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Kenjiro Obara, Satoshi Kakudate, Masataka Nakahira and Akira Ito
: pp. 104-109
Development of Bore Tools for Pipe Welding and Cutting
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Kiyoshi Oka, Akira Ito and Yuji Takiguchi
: pp. 110-115
Development of Bore Tools for Pipe Inspection
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Kiyoshi Oka, Masataka Nakahira, Kou Taguchi and Akira Ito
: pp. 116-120
Development of Thick Wall Welding and Cutting Tools for ITER
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Masataka Nakahira, Hiroyuki Takahashi, Kentaro Akou and Koichi Koizumi
: pp. 121-132
Development of Radiation Hardness Components for ITER Remote Maintenance
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Kenjiro Obara, Satoshi Kakudate, Kiyoshi Oka, Akira Ito, Toshiaki Yagi and Yousuke Morita
: pp. 133-138
Development of Standard Components for Remote Handling
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Kou Taguchi, Satoshi Kakudate, Masataka Nakahira and Akira Ito
: pp. 139-145
Measurement and Control System for ITER Remote Maintenance Equipment
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Kiyoshi Oka, Satoshi Kakudate, Nobukazu Takeda, Yuji Takiguchi and Kentaro Akou
: p. 146
Introduction to Reactor Structure Laboratory – Remote Maintenance Development for ITER –
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Eisuke Tada
: pp. 147-153
An Efficient Computational Algorithm of Adaptive Control for Closed-Loop Robots and Experiments
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Yasuhito Oooka, Haruhisa Kawasaki and Nobuhito Takemura
: pp. 154-157
Study of Stress Analysis Using Facial Skin Temperature
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Hisaya Tanaka and Hideto Ide
: pp. 158-165
Simple Adaptive Control of Systems with Bounded Nonlinear Disturbances
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Kazuya sato, Keigo Watanabe, Masahiro Oya and Toshihiro Kobayashi

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Promoting Intellectual Sports

Special Issue on Promoting Intellectual Sports

: p. 1
Promoting Intellectual Sports
Shigeo Hirose

Are you acquainted with Hackel’s hypothesis? Humans evolved over several billion years from simple creatures living in the sea, to quadrupeds, and finally to bipeds. According to the hypothesis of Ernst Heinrich Hackel (1834-1919), the same evolution takes place in eggs in the human birth process; that is, the phylogeny followed by the species reappears in the process of ontogeny. This hypothesis implies a very important suggestion regarding the training of young engineers who will be the support and driving force of the advanced technology society. Humans built a wonderful advanced technology society by accumulating the technologies developed by their predecessors. If this is to continue, what will be the best way of training genuine engineers able to further develop current advanced technologies? Neither top-down desk theory that teaches theories recursively based on experience nor superficial technical skill training designed to enable students to use state-of-the- art technology products can produce really creative engineers. Most important is not such education but the real experience in which students touch an object, designs the object themselves, and complete the object; that is, the process in which students experience for themselves the phylogeny of technology that humans followed in the process of ontogeny as individual engineers. The training of engineers is the most suitable field for applying Hackel’s hypothesis. We are living in an age flooded with products that make the most of advanced technology. Most products incorporate advanced technology in the form of a black box, which makes the essence of an object more difficult to understand than in the past. Systematic efforts should be made to introduce a new system in which children experience Hackel’s hypothesis without difficulty. One effective measure of achieving this objective is to popularize intellectual sports — games of making objects that liberate people from the conventional fixed concept of objector product manufacturing synonymous with manufacturing activities, and enables them to unconsciously train their engineering sense by letting them naturally accept manufacturing in the process of their growth. F1 contests and human bird contests are examples of such games, but robot contests are a much better example. This is because human-like robots easily attract people’s attention and that the process of constructing robots enables people to learn engineering technology “naturally.” Based on this view, we have compiled reports on the experiences of instructors who conduct creative education through manufacturing of articles, particularly instructors conducting robot contests. The information provided in this special issue will, we hope, serve as research material for instructors starting engineering education and creative education through manufacturing. We aldo hope this issue will contribute to the spread of intellectual sports.

: pp. 2-6
Introduction of “Intelligent Sport”
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Shigeo Hirose
: pp. 7-13
The Design of Projects and Contests – the Rules of the Game
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Rolf Faste and Bernard Roth
: pp. 14-17
Creative Design I as Practical Education
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Hitoshi Tokura
: pp. 18-21
Of Intelligent Robot Contest and Intelligent Working Mobile Robot Japan Cup
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Eiji Nakano
: pp. 22-26
An Analysis of Contesting Robots – Micro Mouse and Sumo Robots
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Chie Kasuga
: pp. 27-29
ROBOLYMPIA Robot Contest
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Toshihiro Tsumura
: pp. 30-33
RoboCup-97
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Minoru Asada
: pp. 34-39
Robot contest “Robocon Yamanashi”
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Noriaki Kiyohiro, Hiroshi Makino and Hideo Mori
: pp. 40-46
Machine Design Education to Stimulate Student Imagination and Originality at Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University
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Motoji Yamamoto
: pp. 47-50
Graduation Thesis on the Manufacture of Mechanism Arts – Educational Reactions on the History of Technology from Students and Effects of Creative Education –
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Ichirou Tsutsumi
: pp. 51-55
Educational Effects of Robot Contests
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Makoto Ami
: pp. 56-61
Active Suspension Control of Elastic Car Structure
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Yasuhisa Fujisaki, Katsuaki Kodaka, Yasuhumi Kawagou, and Kazuto Seto
: pp. 62-68
Estimation of Median-Plane Moving Sound Images by Analytic Hierarchy Process – Headphones –
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Manabu Ishihara, Makoto Matsuo and Jun Shirataki

Vol.9 (1997)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Emerging Technology in Manufacturing

Special Issue on Emerging Technology in Manufacturing

: p. 419
Emerging Technology in Manufacturing
Yoshimi Takeuchi

Manufacturing yields value from worthlessness. Thus, in recent years, manufacturing technologies have been undergoing rapid change in order to produce products of high quality, at a low cost and with short lead times. Improvements and innovations, with regard to manufacturing technologies, range from the fundamentals to large-scale systems. Therefore, the guest editor would like to introduce the new manufacturing technology, together with the latest research results. One of the most recent key technologies is the so-called rapid-prototyping technology. It shortens the development period of new products from the design stage. Many rapid-prototyping technologies are being developed concurrently. In this issue, the state of the art is explained clearly by an expert in the field. For mechanical products, manufacturing capabilities are highly dependent upon machine tools. In this issue, there is a research paper concerned with a design method for multi-purpose machine tools that can fabricate a variety of products. Machining efficiency is strongly influenced by the positioning accuracy and feed velocity of the axis movement of the machine tools. A control algorithm that can achieve high speed and accuracy is proposed in a paper in this issue. In order to make the most of NC machine tools, it is essential to provide NC data rapidly However, it is difficult to generate NC data, especially for multi-axis control machine tools capable of machining workpieces with complicated shapes. The development of 6-axis control CAM software for creating sculpted surfaces is reviewed in the issue. Another paper deals with NC data generation for sculpted surface processing using virtual reality. In FA systems, the nature of the programming/execution environment is shifting from a concentrated one to a distributed one, and a worker-friendly manufacturing environment is required for the workers. Two papers are presented for realizing such environments. Recently, ultra-precision machining and micro-machining technologies have been attracting great interest as a result of their ability to produce micro-mechanisms and micro-robots. One paper describes production of a prototypical tiny part with a sculpted surface using an ultra-precision milling machine. Another is related to simulation of an atomic level cutting mechanism that applies molecular dynamics. Manufacturing technology is making tremendous progress, and is putting promising new technologies into use toward the goal of realizing intelligent manufacturing systems, IMS. The guest editor heartily hopes that this issue aids in comprehension of the emerging technology in the manufacturing field.

: pp. 420-426
Technological Trends of Rapid Tooling by Layer Laminate Manufacturing
Abstract
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Takeo Nakagawa
: pp. 427-433
Design and Evaluation of a New-Type Multifunctional Machine Tool – Functional Requirements and Design –
Abstract
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Nobuhiro Sugimura, Shigeru Ueno, Nozomi Mishima and Soichi Hachiga
: pp. 434-438
Experimental Assessment for Examination of Curves and Surfaces by Auditory Sense
Abstract
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Hidetomo Takahashi and Satoshi Kanai
: pp. 439-445
Development of CAM System Based on Simulation of the Copy Operation – An Application to the Boundary Representation Method and High Efficiency Machining –
Abstract
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Masahide Kohya, Hiroyuki Narahara and Hiroshi Suzuki
: pp. 446-454
A Study on Controlling Algorithm to Realize High-Speed & High-Accuracy Control Systems – Proposal of modified Delta Operator –
Abstract
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Tatsu Aoki, Yuji Furukawa and Nobuyuki Moronuki
: pp. 455-460
A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Rigid-Plastic FEM Simulation of Atomic Level Cutting
Abstract
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Keiji Manabe, Manabu Isobe and Kanji Ueda
: pp. 461-467
The Programming/Execution Environment for Distributed FA Control Systems (1st Report) – The Design and Implementation of the Glue Logic –
Abstract
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Masayuki Takata and Eiji Arai
: pp. 468-474
Distributed Anthropocentric FA System – Manufacturing Machine and Human Interface with Intervention Support System –
Abstract
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Jie Zhu, Tohru Ihara, Kimihiro Amano and Hiroyuki Hiraoka,
: pp. 475-479
Manufacture of Micropropellers by Means of Ultraprecision Milling Machine
Abstract
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Yoshimi Takeuchi, Kiyoshi Sawada and Toshio Sata
: pp. 480-481
Robotics and Computer Integrated Manufacturing System Laboratory
Abstract
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Yoshimi Takeuchi
: pp. 482-489
Allocation of Proximity Sensors for Obstacle Detection of a Robot Manipulator
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Takahiro Tsuchiya and Ryosuke Masuda
: pp. 490-495
3-D Measurement and Computer Graphics of Huge Rock
Abstract
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Kazutaka Fujimoto, Sumio Nagata, Takakazu Ishimatsu
: pp. 496-502
Natural Motion Generation of Biped Locomotion Robot using Hierarchical Evolutionary Algorithm in the Various Environments
Abstract
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Takemasa Arakawa and Toshio Fukuda
: pp. 503-504
Computer Interface Device for the Handicapped to Use Head Movement
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Osamu Takami, Naoki Irie and Takakazu Ishimatsu
: pp. 505-511
The Study of Topograph Analysis of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
Abstract
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Hisaya Tanaka, Hideto Ide and Yuji Nagashima

No.5

(Oct)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: p. 317
Honda’s Humanoid Leads A New Robotic Century
Takayuki Tanaka

The Honda Humanoid announced in the Nikkei Newspaper December 20, 1996, impressed down not only our generation of the famous animation named “Gundom,” but also professors as a great impulse. I had, through talks with colleagues, assumed that this type of human robot would be realized far in the future. I was given an opportunity to see the real product at a workshop sponsored by the International Robot and Factory Automation Association in February 1997. Representative researchers and students came to this workshop with high expectations and excitement. The Honda Humanoid was presented by Hiroyuki Yoshino, vice president of Honda Motor Co. Ltd. The real product was not exhibited at the workshop but presented through video films. However, it was worthy of being called a “fantastic” humanoid. The Humanoid caused viewers to imagine that it was created part of mankind in the real world. It had lived only in the animation or imaginary world. I was really amazed at the shocking behavior of the Humanoid. This is reality! The Humanoid walks on flat floors, on stairs, and on irregular surface smoothly just like a person. It also changes direction freely. If it is pushed from the front, it moves one leg backward to resist the force applied. It walks dynamically like a person wearing space gear. I got gooseflesh. During a break, I found some people mortified at being “beaten” in the creation of a biped walking robot and also those who were excited by the development. The Honda Humanoid will open a new century of robots, and shows the value of taking up a pioneering challenge. I congratulate the Honda development team and its great achievement!

: pp. 318-323
Velocity-Based Control of Manipulator/Vehicle System Floating on Water
Abstract
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Hisashi Kajita and Kazuhiro Kosuge
: pp. 324-331
An Analysis of Inverse Kinematics of Robot Manipulators using Grobner Basis
Abstract
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Toshimi Shimizu and Haruhisa Kawasaki
: pp. 332-340
A Learning Control Application for a Pneumatic Manipulator on Impact Motion
Abstract
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Ismail Altuncu and Toshiro Noritsugu
: pp. 341-347
Micro SCARA Robot for Miniature Parts Assembling
Abstract
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Toyomi Miyagawa, Kohei Hori, Yukihisa Hasegawa, Koichi Suzumori and Hajime Sudo
: pp. 348-353
Autonomous Mobile Robot System for Long Distance Outdoor Navigation on University Campus
Abstract
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Shoichi Maeyama, Akihisa Ohya and Shin'ichi Yuta
: pp. 354-361
Development of an Infrared Sensory System with Local Communication Facility for Collision Avoidance of Multiple Mobile Robots
Abstract
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Sho’ji Suzuki, Yoshikazu Arai, Shin'ya Kotosaka, Hajime Asama,Hayato Kaetsu and Isao Endo
: pp. 362-372
New Design Methodology for RCC Using Elastomer Shear Pads
Abstract
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Sangwan Joo, Naotaka Yoshihara, Yasuhiro Masutani, Atsushi Nishikawa and Fumio Miyazaki
: pp. 373-379
Simulation Language for Multiple Mobile Robots
Abstract
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Yoshinobu Adachi and Masayoshi Kakikura
: pp. 380-386
Environment Recognition and Path Planning by Multiple Mobile Robots
Abstract
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Toshiyuki Kumaki, Masahito Nakajima and Masayoshi Kakikura
: pp. 387-392
Bending and Torsional Vibration Control of a Flexible Structure Using H-infinity Based Approach
Abstract
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Indra N. Kar and Kazuto Seto
: pp. 393-397
Difference of Solution Regions due to Net Polarity
Abstract
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Hiromu Gotanda, Hiroshi Shiratsuchi, Katsuhiro Inoue, and Kousuke Kumamaru
: pp. 398-405
Studies on Cardinality of Solutions for Multilayer Nets and a Scaling Method in Hardware Implementations
Abstract
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Hiromu Gotanda, Hiroshi Shiratsuchi, Katsuhiro Inoue and Kousuke Kumamaru
: pp. 406-411
A Study on Quantification of Weight Sensation by EMG
Abstract
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Hisaya Tanaka, Yoshimi Nakazono and Hideto Ide
: pp. 412-418
Study on Non-Contact Hold and Transfer Control of Spherical Magnetic Body by Magnetic Robot Hand with Prototype Gap Sensor System
Abstract
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Hiroyuki Kojima, Osamu Itagaki, Toshikazu Okabe, and Toshio Kobayashi

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Robot with Integrated Locomotion and Manipulation

Special Issue on Robot with Integrated Locomotion and Manipulation

: p. 247
Robot with Integrated Locomotion and Manipulation
Kan Taguchi

Recently, demand has risen for outdoor robots in architecture, civil engineering, agriculture, fire fighting, or restorations of earthquake disasters. For such cases, robots should have both locomotion and manipulation to work in unknown and unassisted fields. Since robot locomotion and manipulation have been researched independently, robots with integrated locomotion and manipulation are anticipated. However, problems involve the cooperative control of locomotor and manipulators or their integrated mechanisms. In January 1994, the Robotics Society of Japan set up an integrated locomotion and manipulation robot research committee whose aim is identify different aspects of such robots, such as analysis and synthesis of mechanisms, control theory for integrated locomotion and manipulation, and actual on-job applications. The Committee includes researchers from industry, government laboratories, and academia, who have discussed the possibilities of new type robots. The Committee organized sessions such as “Robots with Integrated Locomotion and Manipulations” in the 12th (1994) to 14th (1996) annual conferences of the Robotics Society of Japan and “Integrated Locomotion & Manipulation” in International Robotics Symposium IROS96. A special issue of “Integrated Locomotion and Manipulation” for the Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan was compiled and published in November 1995 by the Committee. In November 1996, the Committee handed in its final report to the Society and adjourned. The final report is in Japanese. As a Committee member, I have wanted to introduce some of the Final Report in English. Fortunately, the editors of the Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics have given me the opportunity to publish these reports in a special issue. Other Committee members have agreed to contribute as well. I thank the Committee — especially Chairman Dr. Tatsuo Arai (MEL), who encouraged me in writing this article. Special thanks go to Prof. Yamafuji, who introduced me to the editors who gave me the chance to publish this article.

: pp. 248-250
Promises and Problems of Locomotion and Manipulation Integrated Robot
Abstract
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Kan Taguchi
: pp. 251-255
Robots with Integrated Locomotion and Manipulation and Their Future
Abstract
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Tatsuo Arai
: pp. 256-261
Mobile Robot in the Clean Room – SEL-CARRY ACE –
Abstract
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Masanori Onishi
: pp. 262-266
Control Strategy for Mobile Manipulators
Abstract
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Hisashi Osumi and Eisuke Konishi
: pp. 267-274
Three-Dimensional Stability Criterion of Integrated Locomotion and Manipulation
Abstract
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Kan Yoneda and Shigeo Hirose
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: pp. 275-282
Development of the Intelligent Mobile Robot for Service Use Report 1: Environmental-Adjustable Autonomous Locomotion Control System
Abstract
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