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JRM Vol.20 No.1 pp. 89-97
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2008.p0089
(2008)

Paper:

Feed-Forward Controller for the Integrated Non-Invasive Ultrasound Diagnosis and Treatment

Norihiro Koizumi*, Kohei Ota**, Deukhee Lee*,
Shin Yoshizawa***, Akira Ito****, Yukio Kaneko****,
Kiyoshi Yoshinaka**, Yoichiro Matsumoto****,
and Mamoru Mitsuishi*

*Department of Engineering Synthesis, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan

**Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo

***Department of Electrical and Communication Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan

****Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo

Received:
October 24, 2006
Accepted:
August 10, 2007
Published:
February 20, 2008
Keywords:
non-invasive ultrasound diagnosis and treatment, motion tracking, feed-forward control, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, medical support system
Abstract

The integrated non-invasive ultrasound diagnosis and treatment we propose tracks and follows movement in an affected area – kidney stones here ” while High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is irradiated onto the area. High-speed CCD camera cannot be used in non-invasive diagnosis and treatment because we must avoid damaging healthy tissue. Servoing error mainly due to ultrasound imaging and its dead time become serious problems, unlike when a high-speed camera is used. We propose feed-forward control using semi-regular kidney movement focusing on enhancing servoing performance.

Cite this article as:
N. Koizumi, K. Ota, D. Lee, <. Yoshizawa, A. Ito, Y. Kaneko, <. Yoshinaka, Y. Matsumoto, and <. Mitsuishi, “Feed-Forward Controller for the Integrated Non-Invasive Ultrasound Diagnosis and Treatment,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.20, No.1, pp. 89-97, 2008.
Data files:
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Last updated on Jun. 14, 2019