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JRM Vol.18 No.1 pp. 26-35
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2006.p0026
(2006)

Paper:

Characteristics of Frictional Sliding Motion in Releasing Manipulation

Chi Zhu*, Yasumichi Aiyama**, Tamio Arai***, and Atsuo Kawamura*

*Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501, Japan

**Institute of Engineering Mechanics and Systems, Tsukuba University

***Department of Precision Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo

Received:
March 28, 2005
Accepted:
July 5, 2005
Published:
February 20, 2006
Keywords:
frictional sliding, trajectory, final motion, releasing manipulation, initial velocity
Abstract

Focusing on freely frictional sliding motion and based on mathematical analysis and physical concepts, it is clarified that the translational and rotational motions stop simultaneously, and the direction of final motion depends on the final configuration and geometric properties of an object but is independent of initial velocity. One extreme case of initially translation-dominant motion is intensively investigated with simplified approach. A series of important properties and motion monotonicity of sliding motion are obtained. Based on the above results, an inverse problem to determine the necessary initial translational and rotational velocity becomes very easy and straightforward.

Cite this article as:
Chi Zhu, Yasumichi Aiyama, Tamio Arai, and Atsuo Kawamura, “Characteristics of Frictional Sliding Motion in Releasing Manipulation,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.18, No.1, pp. 26-35, 2006.
Data files:
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