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JRM Vol.17 No.2 pp. 149-157
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2005.p0149
(2005)

Paper:

Development of a Hydraulically-Driven Flexible Manipulator for Neurosurgery

Haruna Okayasu*, Jun Okamoto*, Hiroshi Iseki**,
and Masakatsu G. Fujie***

*Graduate school of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan

**Faculty of Advanced Techno-Surgery, Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering & Science, Graduate school of Medicine, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan

***Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan

Received:
October 18, 2004
Accepted:
January 12, 2005
Published:
April 20, 2005
Keywords:
minimally invasive surgery, hydraulically driven system, neurosurgery
Abstract

Minimally invasive surgery has recently become a key word in medical engineering. In this operation, to facilitate the introduction of surgical instruments, spatulas which push tissues aside and retain the approach path to the affected area as well as workspace for the insertion of such instruments are necessary. Therefore, a new type of hydraulically-driven flexible manipulator for neurosurgery has been developed. Including an attached balloon and using only physiological saline for the drive system, the safety of the brain tissue, especially in terms of pressure, is assured as is the simplicity of the mechanism. In addition, this provides the advantage of MRI compatibility. Following several positive evaluations, the effectiveness of this manipulator has been proven as a new type of medical device.

Cite this article as:
H. Okayasu, J. Okamoto, H. Iseki, and <. Fujie, “Development of a Hydraulically-Driven Flexible Manipulator for Neurosurgery,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.17, No.2, pp. 149-157, 2005.
Data files:
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Last updated on Feb. 17, 2020