single-rb.php

JRM Vol.19 No.2 pp. 134-140
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2007.p0134
(2007)

Paper:

Grasping Operation Based on Functional Cooperation of Fingers

Kazuyuki Nagata*, Fuminori Saito**, Yujin Wakita*,
and Takashi Suehiro*

*Intelligent Systems Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Japan

**Former member of National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Currently at Toyota Motor Corporation, 1 Toyota-cho, Toyota, Aichi 471-8571, Japan)

Received:
October 18, 2006
Accepted:
February 9, 2007
Published:
April 20, 2007
Keywords:
robot hand, robot finger, manipulation, primitive operation, finger partitioning
Abstract

When we observe human grasping, some grasping operations consist of multiple cooperative primitive operations. Performing individual movements by different fingers in a grasping operation are generally called “partitioning of fingers.” Our interest is not in the individual movement of each finger, but in functional units of operations constituting entire grasping operations realized by fingers working together. We define such functional unit operation as a “primitive operation.” When one grasping operation consists of multiple cooperative primitive operations and fingers are used in different primitive operations, we call this “functional partitioning of fingers.” By assigning different primitive operations to functional partitioning of fingers, robot can realize various grasping operations. This paper shows that primitive operations can be described in software modules running in multifingered robot hand system, and demonstrates that various grasping operations are achieved by cooperation of primitive operations.

Cite this article as:
Kazuyuki Nagata, Fuminori Saito, Yujin Wakita, and
and Takashi Suehiro, “Grasping Operation Based on Functional Cooperation of Fingers,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.19, No.2, pp. 134-140, 2007.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] R. S. Fearing, “Implementing a Force Strategy for Object Reorientation,” Proc. of IEEE 1986 Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 96-102, 1986.
  2. [2] T. H. Speeter, “Primitive Based Control of the Utah/MIT Dexterous Hand,” Proc. of IEEE 1991 Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 866-877, 1991.
  3. [3] P. Michelman and P. Allen, “Compliant Manipulation with a Dexterous Robot Hand,” Proc. of IEEE 1993 Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 711-716, 1993.
  4. [4] P. Michelman and P. Allen, “Forming Complex Dexterous Manipulations from Task Primitives,” Proc. of IEEE 1994 Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 3383-3388, 1994.
  5. [5] T. Omata and K. Nagata, “Planning Reorientation of an object with a Multifingered Hand,” Proc. of 1994 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 3104-3110, 1994.
  6. [6] T. Omata and M. A. Farooqi, “Regrasps by a Multifingered Hand based on Primitives,” Proc. of 1996 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 2774-2780, 1996.
  7. [7] M. A. Farooqi, T. Tanaka, Y. Ikezawa, T. Omata, and K. Nagata, “Sensor Based Control for the Execution of Regrasping Primitives on a Multifingered Hand,” Proc. of 1999 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 3217-3223, 1999.
  8. [8] M. Huber and R. A. Grupen, “Robust Finger Gaits from Closed-Loop Controllers,” Proc. of IEEE/RSJ Int. Conf. Intelligent Robotics and Systems, pp. 1578-1584, 2002.
  9. [9] T. Okada, “Motion of Fingers and Analysis of Manual Handling Tasks,” Biomechanism 3, Society of Biomechanisms Japan edition, University of Tokyo Press, pp. 133-144, 1975 (in Japanese).
  10. [10] N. Kamakura, “Form of Hand and Motion of Hand,” Ishiyaku Publishers, 1989 (in Japanese).
  11. [11] F. Saito and K. Nagata, “Interpretation of Grasp and Manipulation Based on Grasping Surfaces,” Proc. of 1999 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 1247-1254, 1999.
  12. [12] K. Nagata, F. Saito, and T. Suehiro, “Grasping operation by cooperation of finger motion primitives,” Proc. of SI2005, pp. 53-54, 2005 (in Japanese).

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, Opera.

Last updated on Oct. 25, 2021