single-rb.php

JRM Vol.20 No.4 pp. 641-649
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2008.p0641
(2008)

Paper:

Psychological Influence of Wheelchairs on the Elderly Persons from Qualitative Research of Daily Living

Misato Nihei*, Takenobu Inoue**, and Masakatsu G. Fujie***

*Department of Engineering Synthesis, The University of Tokyo, 3-4-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan

** Research Institute of National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, 4-1 Namiki, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8555, Japan

*** Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan

Received:
October 17, 2007
Accepted:
February 5, 2008
Published:
August 20, 2008
Keywords:
elderly person, mobility aid, wheelchair, qualitative research, psychological conceptual model
Abstract

The aging of society has triggered advances in research on geriatric and other assistive devices (ADs), collectively called assistive technologies (ATs). We focused on the relationship between ADs and psychology, e.g., the psychological effect of the AD on users, taking the wheelchair as an example. Participants were 12 elderly persons whom we qualitative studied to identify detrimental factors. We found that elderly persons face the dilemma of maintaining physical function versus expanding mobility via aids such as wheelchairs. Users faced problems in physical function and body image – what impression does a wheelchair user make on other? We considered these problems and adapted a psychological model to aid AD developers in understanding the elderly psychological mindset. No matter how fancy or useful a device developed, after all, it cannot be practically applied without taking into account the physical aspects, lifestyles, and psychological circumstances of elderly persons.

Cite this article as:
Misato Nihei, Takenobu Inoue, and Masakatsu G. Fujie, “Psychological Influence of Wheelchairs on the Elderly Persons from Qualitative Research of Daily Living,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.20, No.4, pp. 641-649, 2008.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] “The Chabinet Office, an aging society white paper 2007,” 2007 edition,
    http://www8.cao.go.jp/kourei/whitepaper/w-2007/zenbun/19index.html (ref. 2007-11)
  2. [2] M.Watanabe, et al., “Outline of the Strategic Technology Road Map of METI and Expectation for the Society of Life Support Technology and the Japanese Society for Wellbeing Science and Assistive Technology,” J. of the Japanese Society for Wellbeing Science and Assistive Technology, Vol.6, No.1, pp. 3-12, 2006.
  3. [3] M. Fujie, “Nowadays and Future in the Research and Development forWelfare Equipments,” J. of the Robotics Society of Japan, Vol.21 No.4, pp. 336-339, 2003.
  4. [4] “Body function Database of elderly persons,”
    http://www.hql.jp/project/funcdb1993/ (ref. 2007-12)
  5. [5] S. Hisamoto, “ISO/IEC Guide 71 and Physiological Characteristics of Japanese,” Rehabilitation Engineering, Vol.22, No.3, pp. 144-150, 2007.
  6. [6] T. Sakaki, et al., “Robotic Rehabilitation System for Recovery of Lower Extremity,” J. of the Robotics Society of Japan, Vol.21, No.4, pp. 390-393, 2003.
  7. [7] I. Takeuchi, et al., “The Development of Walking Support Machine,” J. of the Robotics Society of Japan, Vol.21, No.4, pp. 382-389, 2003.
  8. [8] K.Miyawaki, et al., “Evaluation of the Gait for Elderly People with Assisting Cart: 1st Report,” Gait on Flat Surface, Trans. Of the JSME, Series C, Vol.65, No.640, pp. 4759-4766, 1999.
  9. [9] Y. Shinomiya, “Development of Horseback Riding Therapeutic Equipment and its Verification on the Effect of the Muscle strength training,” TVRSJ, Vol.6, No.3, pp. 197-202, 2001.
  10. [10] “Verification of Physical Training Effects on Horse Riding Simulation Equipment “JOBA DIET-EXA”,” Matsushita Technical Journal, Aug. 2003.
  11. [11] R. Descartes, “Houhoujosetsu Seisatsu (in Japanese),” Hakusuisha, 1996.
  12. [12] K. Inoue, “Rounen shinrigakku,” Asakura shoten, 2002.
  13. [13] T. Kimura, et al., “Theories on Living Environment,” Ishiyaku publishers, Inc., 2001.
  14. [14] R. Morales, et al., “Coordinated Motion of a New Staircase Climbing Wheelchair with Increased Passenger Comfort,” Proc. of the 2006 IEEE ICRA, pp. 3995-4001, 2006.
  15. [15] Q. Zeng, et al., “Design of a Collaborative Wheelchair with Path Guidance Assistance,” Proc. of the 2006 IEEE ICRA, pp. 877-882, 2006.
  16. [16] J. L.Murray, et al., “Modeling of a stair-climbing wheelchair mechanism with high single step capability,” IEEE Trans. on neural system and rehabilitation engineering, Vol.11, No.3, pp. 323-332, 2003.
  17. [17] T. Inoue, et al., “Development of Head Controlled Powered Wheelchair Based on Components of QOL,” J. of the Japanese Society for Wellbeing Science and Assistive Technology, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 42-49, 2002.
  18. [18] M. Iwabuchi, “Assistive Technology Outcome Measurement in North America and Europe,” J. of the Japanese Society for Wellbeing Science and Assistive Technology, Vol.6, No.1, pp. 34-41, 2006.
  19. [19] L. Dmers, et al., “Reliability validity and applicability of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0) for adults with multiple sclerosis,” Disability and Rehabilitation, Vol.24, pp. 21-30, 2002.
  20. [20] J. Jutai, et al., “Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Device Scale (PIADS),” Technology and Disability, Vol.14, pp. 107-111, 2002.
  21. [21] T. Kamimura, “Reliability and Validity of the Japanese version of QUEST 2.0,” 14th congress of the world federation of occupational therapist, Sydney, 2006.
  22. [22] R. Wessels, et al., “Non-use of provided assistive technology devices,” a literature overview, Technology and Disability 15, pp. 231-238, 2003.
  23. [23] M. Suzuki, “Walking paranoid and aging psychology,” Clinical Study, 2002-6, Vol.23, No.7, pp. 34-37, 2002.
  24. [24] H. Rosalind, et al., “Wheelchair Users and Postural Seating –A Clinical Approach–,” Churchill Living stone, 1998.
  25. [25] M. Roelands, et al., “A Social-Cognitive Model to Predict the Use of Assistive devices for Mobility and Self-care in Elderly People,” The Gerontologist, 42(1), pp. 39-50, 2002.
  26. [26] D. J. Baker, et al., “Acceptance and Meanings of Wheelchair Use in Senior Stroke Survivors,” American journal of occupational therapy, Vol.58, No.2, pp. 221-230, 2004.
  27. [27] L. Deborah, et al., “Technology, Selfhood and Physical Disability,” Social Science & Medicine, 50, pp. 1851-1862, 2000.
  28. [28] F. Uwe, “Qualitative Forschung,” pp. 3-20, Shunjusha, 2003.
  29. [29] Y. Minoura, “The Technique and Application of Fieldwork –Introduction to Micro-Ethnography– (in Japanese),” MINERUVA Publishing, 1999.
  30. [30] D. J. Baker, et al., “Acceptance and Meanings of Wheelchair Use in Senior Stroke Survivors, American journal of occupational therapy,” Vol.58, No.2, pp. 221-230, 2004.
  31. [31] L. Deborah, et al., “Technology, Selfhood and Physical Disability,” Social Science & Medicine, 50, pp. 1851-1862, 2000.
  32. [32] J&L. Lofland, “Analyzing Social Setting,” pp. 243-276, Kouseisha Kouseikaku, 2004.
  33. [33] M. Nihei, et al., “Proposition of Development Concept of Mobility Aids Based on Psychological Model of Older Persons,” Transactions of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, Series C, 73-725, pp. 266-273, 2007.
  34. [34] C. M. Morell, “Empowerment and long-living women: return the rejected body,” Journal of Asing Studies, Vol.17, No.1, pp. 69-85, 2003.

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, Opera.

Last updated on Oct. 20, 2021