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JRM Vol.20 No.5 pp. 731-738
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2008.p0731
(2008)

Paper:

Control of Human Generating Force by Use of Acoustic Information? Substituting Artificial Sounds for Onomatopoeic Utterances

Miki Iimura*, Taichi Sato*, and Kihachiro Tanaka**

*School of Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, 2-2 Kanda-Nishiki-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8457, Japan

**Faculty of Engineering, Saitama University, 255, Shimo-okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 338-8570, Japan

Received:
February 25, 2008
Accepted:
July 18, 2008
Published:
October 20, 2008
Keywords:
onomatopoeia, artificial sound, human sensitivity, lifting action, emotion
Abstract

We have conducted basic experiments for applying onomatopoeia to engineering problems. Subjects were made to conduct lifting while listening to acoustic information consisting of onomatopoeic utterances and artificial sounds. We demonstrated a relationship between acoustic information and lifting-forces exerted by subjects. Here, we replaced onomatopoeic utterances with artificial sounds related to onomatopoeic utterances “with or without emotion,” and show that onomatopoeic utterances “with emotion” can indeed be replaced by composite sounds, including sweep sounds with a high center frequency. We also show that onomatopoeic utterances “without emotion” and pure sound have the same effect on the magnitude of lifting-force.

Cite this article as:
Miki Iimura, Taichi Sato, and Kihachiro Tanaka, “Control of Human Generating Force by Use of Acoustic Information? Substituting Artificial Sounds for Onomatopoeic Utterances,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.20, No.5, pp. 731-738, 2008.
Data files:
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