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JRM Vol.16 No.3 pp. 319-326
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2004.p0319
(2004)

Paper:

Four-Wheeled Hopping Robot with Attitude Control

Shingo Shimoda*, Takashi Kubota**, and Ichiro Nakatani**

*The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan

**The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 229-8510, Japan

Received:
October 26, 2003
Accepted:
February 10, 2004
Published:
June 20, 2004
Keywords:
microgravity, hopping robot, attitude control, 2DOF controller
Abstract

Because a hopping robot moves long distances at minimum energy and can observe its surrounding from high points when it jumps, it is expected to explore microgravity environments effectively. Despite the importance of attitude control in such exploratory robots, few attitude control mechanisms have been proposed. This paper proposes a four-wheeled hopping robot that hops horizontally and lands without bouncing. Its wheels are applied to attitude control in the air. A simulation study and free-fall experiments verified the feasibility of the proposed mobility and the applicability of the robot.

Cite this article as:
Shingo Shimoda, Takashi Kubota, and Ichiro Nakatani, “Four-Wheeled Hopping Robot with Attitude Control,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.16, No.3, pp. 319-326, 2004.
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Last updated on Oct. 15, 2021