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JDR

Journal of Disaster Research

ISSN : 1881-2473(Print) / 1883-8030(Online)
DOI : 10.20965/jdr.issn.1883-8030
Editor-in-Chief :Haruo Hayashi (Prof. Emeritus, Kyoto University)
Shunichi Koshimura (Tohoku University)

Indexed in ESCI, Scopus, Compendex (Ei), DOAJ

Journal Impact Factor: 0.8 (2022)

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Vol.19 (2024)

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on World BOSAI Forum 2023 / IDRC 2023 in SENDAI

Special Issue on World BOSAI Forum 2023 / IDRC 2023 in SENDAI

Editorial: pp. 487-488
World BOSAI Forum 2023 / IDRC 2023 in SENDAI
Fumihiko Imamura, Yuichi Ono, Daisuke Sasaki, and Yuta Hara

The World BOSAI Forum 2023 (WBF2023), held in March 2023 in Sendai, Japan, was successfully convened as a global platform for practical discussion of disaster risk reduction issues in a free and dynamic manner, in contrast to the United Nations, where national interests collide, or academic conferences where experts gather. In particular, we aimed to disseminate the knowledge and lessons learned from the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami (GEJET) to the world and share the knowledge and lessons with Japan. We would like to take this opportunity again to express our heartfelt gratitude to all those who participated in the sessions, exhibitions, posters, and flash talk presentations, as well as to the many locals who attended the event. According to the World BOSAI Forum [1], the WBF2023 was attended by 5,412 people over 3 days, including 1,335 pre-registrants from 40 countries and regions, on-site registrants, and EXPO participants. It included 30 oral sessions, 7 conferences, 50 poster sessions, 33 flash talk presentations, and 33 exhibition booths, where tangible solutions for disaster risk reduction were discussed through dialogue among international organizations, governments, academia, the private sector, NGOs, and citizens.

At the forum, Tohoku University hosted 4 sessions and co-hosted 10 sessions, which introduced the role of Tohoku University and the International Research Institute of Disaster Science as well as their contributions to the processes of recovery and reconstruction from the 2011 GEJET.

Finally, the forum came up with recommendations for a Midterm Review of the Implementation of the Sendai Framework 2015–2030 (MTR SF). In May 2023, the High-Level Meeting of the General Assembly on the MTR SF was held at the United Nations Headquarters in New York [2].

The guest editors are pleased to publish this special issue in the Journal of Disaster Research, which comprises six articles sharing the research advancements presented at the WBF2023. We hope that this special issue on the WBF2023 will contribute to the literature on disaster science and further advance disaster ri...<more>

Paper: pp. 489-500
A Study on Digital Model for Decision-Making in Crisis Response
Abstract
Naoko Kosaka, Shuji Moriguchi, Akihiro Shibayama, Tsuneko Kura, Naoko Shigematsu, Kazuki Okumura, Erick Mas, Makoto Okumura, Shunichi Koshimura, Kenjiro Terada, Akinori Fujino, Hiroshi Matsubara, and Masaki Hisada
Paper: pp. 501-511
The 2019 Rugby World Cup and Economic Impacts on Hotels Recovering from Disasters
Abstract
David N. Nguyen
Survey Report: pp. 512-522
Transition of the World BOSAI Forum: Looking Back at the Past Three Forums
Abstract
Soraya Ono, Daisuke Sasaki, Yuta Hara, and Yuichi Ono
Note: pp. 523-533
Panel Discussion in WBF 2023: New Collaboration for Building a Resilient Society
Abstract
Noriko Uchida, Shuji Seto, Anawat Suppasri, Takahiro Ono, Makoto Kobayashi, Mari Yasuda, Fumika Iitoyo, Keiko Itabashi, and Fumihiko Imamura
Note: pp. 534-538
Transdisciplinary Approach: Toward Innovative Recovery and Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Mikio Ishiwatari, Miho Ohara, Khamarrul Azahari Razak, Masashi Inoue, Xiang Zheng, and Rajib Shaw
Note: pp. 539-549
Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction Toward a Society Wherein All People Can Choose How They Live: A Report from a Panel of World BOSAI Forum 2023
Abstract
Yuta Hara, Takashi Izutsu, Eiko Narita, Koichi Tanaka, Natsuki Soda, Rika Sugata, Daisuke Sasaki, and Yuichi Ono

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 551-559
Research on the Forecast of Emergency Supplies for Major Public Health Emergencies - An Empirical Study Based on the Distribution of Donated Facial Masks by the Wuhan COVID-19 Epidemic Prevention and Control Headquarters
Abstract
Zhu Xiaoxin, Wen Zhimin, David Regan, and Zhu Wenlong
Paper: pp. 560-569
Disaster Education Model for Prospective Science Teachers: Needs Analysis and Initial Development
Abstract
Elvara Norma Aroyandini, Supriyadi, Ani Rusilowati, Hartono, and Juhadi
Paper: pp. 570-579
Factors Contributing to the Enhancement of Feasibility in Public–Private Partnership During Disasters
Abstract
Tetsuya Torayashiki and Kenji Watanabe
Paper: pp. 580-589
Social Support Is Associated with Fewer Mental Health Problems Among Japanese Nurses During COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study
Abstract
Michihiro Tsubaki, Yoshiyasu Ito, Takafumi Nagashima, Yoko Tsujimoto, Toru Anzai, Susumu Yagome, and Hideko Koizumi

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on Crowd Management and its Applications

Special Issue on Crowd Management and its Applications

Editorial: pp. 237-238
Crowd Management and its Applications
Katsuhiro Nishinari and Ken-ichi Tanaka

This special issue summarizes the research findings of the “Crowd Control Adaptive to Individual and Group Attributes” project, which is selected as a full-scale research project under the “Development of the Crisis Navigator for Individuals” prioritized theme of the JST Mirai Program.*

Despite the lingering memory of the 2022 crowd accident in Itaewon, South Korea, similar accidents have occurred worldwide, including the firework display in Akashi, Japan, and the Love Parade in Germany. Addressing this social issue is imperative. To significantly reduce the risk of crowd accidents, this project aimed to elucidate the mechanism underlying human flow stagnation and establish a method to effectively guide the flow of people. Our approach involves creating a mathematical model that can estimate the flow of people by considering individual and group attributes, such as wheelchair and group behavior, to accurately predict flow stagnation. Based on these predictions, we developed a system that provides individuals with information on movement and utilizes technology to guide crowd flow, drawing principles from game theory and nudge theory. This system is characterized by integrating information on human flow, environmental factors, simulation results for predicting future conditions, and crowd control measures within the Crowd Management Platform as a Service (CMPaaS). Furthermore, we conducted demonstration tests at shopping malls, train stations, and event venues, and found that it offers valuable guidance to achieve risk reduction effects at real-world sites.

In this special issue, the first paper presents an overview of the newly created crowd management platform. Thereafter, it is organized into 16 articles presenting current research results categorized under Simulation, Theory, Control, Experiment, and Data Analysis, followed by a note on visitor trajectories in indoor facilities.

We anticipate that the outcomes of this study will facilitate interdisciplinary research in this field and promote the social implementation of crowd management platforms to prevent crowd accidents, thus creating ...<more>

Paper: pp. 239-247
Recent Developments in Crowd Management: Theory and Applications
Abstract
Katsuhito Nishinari, Claudio Feliciani, Xiaolu Jia, and Sakurako Tanida
Paper: pp. 248-255
Development of a Real-Time Crowd Flow Prediction and Visualization Platform for Crowd Management
Abstract
Kensuke Yasufuku and Akira Takahashi
Paper: pp. 256-267
SBAA: Simulation-Based Agile Approach to Crowd Control Planning
Abstract
Masako Inoue, Kazutaka Kimura, and Atsushi Yamauchi
Paper: pp. 268-278
Evaluation of Tsunami Evacuation Plans for an Underground Mall Using an Agent-Based Model
Abstract
Akira Takahashi and Kensuke Yasufuku
Paper: pp. 279-292
Modeling and Questionnaire Survey for Effective Regulated Egress Based on Level of Discomfort
Abstract
Riku Miyagawa, Daichi Yanagisawa, Xiaolu Jia, Yasushi Shoji, Tetsuya Aikoh, and Katsuhiro Nishinari
Paper: pp. 293-302
Using Virtual Reality to Study the Effectiveness of Crowd Control Medium and Information
Abstract
Shuhei Miyano
Paper: pp. 303-315
Ticketing and Crowd Management System for Attraction Facilities: An Aquarium Case Study
Abstract
Yoshiaki Nakagawa, Yukari Abe, and Masami Isobe
Paper: pp. 316-324
Development of Reward-Based Crowd Management System and Field Evaluation of Safety and Profitability
Abstract
Shogo Shimizu, Ryoji Hattori, Takayuki Kodaira, Daishin Ito, and Yoshie Imai
Paper: pp. 325-335
Influencing Pedestrian Route Choice Through Environmental Stimuli: A Long-Term Ecological Experiment
Abstract
Claudio Feliciani, Sakurako Tanida, Xiaolu Jia, and Katsuhiro Nishinari
Paper: pp. 336-346
Evaluating Pedestrian Congestion Based on Missing Sensing Data
Abstract
Xiaolu Jia, Claudio Feliciani, Sakurako Tanida, Daichi Yanagisawa, and Katsuhiro Nishinari
Paper: pp. 347-358
Investigating the Congestion Levels on a Mesoscopic Scale During Outdoor Events
Abstract
Sakurako Tanida, Claudio Feliciani, Xiaolu Jia, Hyerin Kim, Tetsuya Aikoh, and Katsuhiro Nishinari
Paper: pp. 359-369
Visitors’ Attitudes Toward the Expansion of Alternative Shuttle Bus System in Shiretoko National Park
Abstract
Tetsuya Aikoh, Satoshi Yahiro, Yasushi Shoji, and Hyerin Kim
Paper: pp. 370-378
Investigating Visitors’ Perceptions and Behaviors in a Crowded Situation at a Large-Scale Exhibition
Abstract
Hyerin Kim, Claudio Feliciani, Sakurako Tanida, Xiaolu Jia, Tetsuya Aikoh, Yasushi Shoji, and Katsuhiro Nishinari
Paper: pp. 379-385
Adaptive Formation by Pedestrian Small Groups During Egresses
Abstract
Hisashi Murakami, Claudio Feliciani, and Katsuhiro Nishinari
Paper: pp. 386-395
Impact of COVID-19 Countermeasures on South Korean Citizens’ Behavior and Psychological Changes: An Online Survey Between the First Waves of the Pandemic
Abstract
Hiroki Kuroha, Karri Flinkman, Sae Kondo, Chikako Goto, Claudio Feliciani, and Hwajin Lim
Paper: pp. 396-407
Cross-Cultural Comparison of Mood Perception During Initial Pandemic Response
Abstract
Karri Flinkman, Claudio Feliciani, Hwajin Lim, Hiroki Kuroha, Sae Kondo, Chikako Goto, and Hideki Koizumi
Note: pp. 408-410
Visualization and Analysis of Visitor Trajectories and Stops in Indoor Exhibition Facilities
Abstract
Takashi Chiba

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 411-419
Development of Evaluation Criteria for Training Fire Students to Enable New Rescue Roles in Vietnam
Abstract
Hung Le Tien, Nam Pham Van, and Takaaki Kato
Paper: pp. 420-428
Risk Mapping of COVID-19 to Create a Common Operating Picture Using Data from Wastewater Monitoring
Abstract
Tomoko Takeda, Kazushiro Yoshimori, Eiji Haramoto, Shingo Toride, and Masaaki Kitajima
Paper: pp. 429-445
Comparative Study of Radiation Mapping Technologies for Nuclear Disaster Assessment
Abstract
Kotaro Ochi, Evelyne Barker, Shigeo Nakama, Marc Gleizes, Erwan Manach, Vincent Faure, and Yukihisa Sanada
Paper: pp. 446-454
Estimating the Effects of Regulating In-Person University Lectures on the Spread of COVID-19: Evidence from Japan
Abstract
Michinao Okachi and Haewon Youn
Paper: pp. 455-464
Flood Risk Assessment of the Middle Reach of the Helmand River, Afghanistan
Abstract
Karimullah Sefat and Ryota Tsubaki
Paper: pp. 465-477
Comprehensive Analysis and Rehabilitation of a Slow-Moving Landslide in Vietnam Using Laboratory and Field Measurements
Abstract
Tuan-Nghia Do, Lan Chau Nguyen, Surya Sarat Chandra Congress, and Anand J. Puppala

No.1

(Feb)

MURAKAMI Suminao Award 2023 and the JDR Annual Awards 2023
Special Issue on Literacy for Disaster Resilience: Building a Societal Capacity for Reducing Disasters Due to Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption

MURAKAMI Suminao Award 2023 and the JDR Annual Awards 2023

Award: pp. 5-7
Congratulations! MURAKAMI Suminao Award for Disaster Research 2023 and the JDR Annual Awards 2023
Editorial Office

We are pleased to announce that the MURAKAMI Suminao Award for Disaster Research and the JDR annual awards (the JDR Award for the Most Cited Paper, the JDR Award for the Most Downloaded Article, and the JDR Award for the Most Contributory Reviewer) of 2023 have been decided by the JDR editorial boards. The award ceremony was held on December 6, 2023 at Gakushikaikan, Tokyo, Japan. We congratulate the winners and sincerely wish for future success.

Award: pp. 8-13
Messages from the Winners
Editorial Office

Message from the Winner, Fumihiko Imamura

Message from the Winner, Ryohei Kato

Message from the Winner, Chun-Hao Shao

Message from the Winner, Pei-Chun Shao

Message from the Winner, Fang-Ming Kuo

Message from the Winner, Reo Kimura

Special Issue on Literacy for Disaster Resilience: Building a Societal Capacity for Reducing Disasters Due to Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption

Editorial: pp. 17-18
Literacy for Disaster Resilience: Building a Societal Capacity for Reducing Disasters Due to Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption
Makoto Takahashi and Naoyuki Kato

The national earthquake and national volcanic eruption prediction programs of Japan started in 1965 and 1974, respectively, based on the recommendation of the Geodesy Council. As a result, observations of seismic and volcanic activity have been enhanced and our understanding of the mechanisms of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions has made significant advances. However, these research results did not fully contribute to mitigating the damage caused by the 1995 Kobe earthquake or the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. In order to make further contributions to disaster mitigation, we recognize the importance of research to apply the scientific understanding of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in collaboration with researchers in related research fields. The Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program (2014–2018) was thus started on the basis of a recommendation of the Council for Science and Technology.

In this Program, research in the area of forecasting the hazards of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions has become one of the main pillars of research. Disaster information and knowledge of the disaster process, which involve the interaction of hazards and natural and social vulnerability, have been investigated in cooperation with earth scientists, engineers, and social scientists. On the basis of our results, research on literacy for disaster resilience was selected as one of the main pillars of research in the Second Observation and Research Program of Earthquake and Volcano Hazards (2019–2023), because a better understanding of and immediate information about disasters are important for disaster mitigation.

This special issue, which aims to disseminate the results of almost five years of research activities on literacy for disaster resilience in that Program, includes 15 papers and survey reports from multidisciplinary fields of study. The collection begins with Kimura and Ikeda’s important paper discussing the conceptual structure of the knowledge and abilities necessary to build disaster resilience capacities by analyzing school and community-based efforts, followed by a variety of empirical stud...<more>

Paper: pp. 19-29
Features and Issues of Disaster Management Education Practices in Schools and Communities in Japan: Based on an Analysis of Activities of Organizations Participating in the “Disaster Management Education Challenge Plan” of the Cabinet Office
Abstract
Reo Kimura and Masaki Ikeda
Paper: pp. 30-37
Reconstructing Historical Terrain to Elucidate the Causes of Disaster Occurrence and Improve Disaster Prevention Literacy
Abstract
Yuichi Ebina and Daisuke Sugawara
Paper: pp. 38-49
Damage by the 1855 Edo Earthquake and Response to the Disaster—Study Based on Edo Ohjishin no Zu (Picture Scroll of the 1855 Edo Earthquake)—
Abstract
Reiko Sugimori
Survey Report: pp. 50-55
Vulnerability of Aso Volcano’s Disaster Mitigation System, as Revealed by the Phreatic Eruption of October 20, 2021
Abstract
Takahiro Ohkura
Paper: pp. 56-71
Development of Cloud-Based Support Tools for Effective Evacuation Focusing on Time-Phase from Pre-Registration to Post-Incident Response to Improve Literacy for Disaster Resilience
Abstract
Munenari Inoguchi
Survey Report: pp. 72-80
System Development for Tsunami Evacuation Drill Using ICT and Tsunami Inundation Simulation Data
Abstract
Daisuke Shiozaki and Yuichi Hashimoto
Paper: pp. 81-93
A Risk-Scrutinizing Attitude is Independent of Risk-Sensitive Attitude and May Hamper a Proper Protective Response: A Tsunami Simulation Experiment
Abstract
Masato Takubo, Motoaki Sugiura, Ryo Ishibashi, Naoki Miura, and Azumi Tanabe-Ishibashi
Paper: pp. 94-104
How Disaster Prevention Videos Contribute to Tsunami Evacuation: Subjective Motivation and Risk-Sensitive Attitude in a Simulation Experiment
Abstract
Masato Takubo, Motoaki Sugiura, Ryo Ishibashi, Naoki Miura, and Azumi Tanabe-Ishibashi
Survey Report: pp. 105-112
The Possibility of Wide Area Evacuation in the Event of Natural Disasters: A Survey in Amagasaki City, Hyogo Prefecture
Abstract
Masahiro Sawada and Takao Sato
Paper: pp. 113-123
Literacy for Disaster Resilience from “Downstream”: A Case Study of the Nankai Trough Earthquake Countermeasures in Kochi City
Abstract
Kenji Muroi
Paper: pp. 124-138
Proposal for a Disaster Management Drill Program for High School Students Who Have Never Experienced a Disaster to Foster a Sense of “Awareness that Disaster Affects Everyone”
Abstract
Reo Kimura and Kazuki Aikawa
Paper: pp. 139-146
Open Science for Fostering Seismologic Science Literacy
Abstract
Katsuya Yamori
Survey Report: pp. 147-153
Open-Door Events of the Sakurajima Volcano Observatory, Kyoto University in the Last Ten Years
Abstract
Haruhisa Nakamichi
Survey Report: pp. 154-158
Open Science Initiatives by Sakurajima Volcano Observatory
Abstract
Mayumi Sakamoto and Haruhisa Nakamichi
Paper: pp. 159-172
Comparative Study of Literacy Enhancement on Volcanic Disaster Reduction for the Residents and Visitors in Mt. Ontakesan and Other Volcanic Areas
Abstract
Masae Horii, Koshun Yamaoka, Haeng-Yoong Kim, Satoshi Takewaki, and Takahiro Kunitomo

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 173-181
Exploring of the Factors Behind Disaster-Related Deaths
Abstract
Marina Inagaki
Paper: pp. 182-191
Examining the Relationship Between Disaster Scenarios and Disaster Management Behavior During Earthquakes
Abstract
Kosuke Nakazawa, Shoji Ohtomo, Reo Kimura, Toshimitsu Nagata, and Masaki Ikeda
Paper: pp. 192-203
Estimation of Direct Damage Caused by the Nankai Trough Earthquake Considering Hazard and Social Characteristics
Abstract
Qinglin Cui, Hiromitsu Nakamura, Yoshinobu Mizui, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
Paper: pp. 204-213
Intelligent System Detection of Dead Victims at Natural Disaster Areas Using Deep Learning
Abstract
Moch. Zen Samsono Hadi, Prima Kristalina, Aries Pratiarso, M. Helmi Fauzan, and Roycardo Nababan
Paper: pp. 214-225
New Capital City of Indonesia, an Opportunity or Threat for Ecotourism Resilience in East Borneo
Abstract
Eman Sukmana and Amiril Azizah

Vol.18 (2023)

No.8

(Dec)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 825-834
Estimation of the Seismic Source of the 1974 Lima Peru Earthquake and Tsunami (Mw 8.1)
Abstract
Cesar Jimenez, Jorge Morales, Miguel Estrada, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, and Shunichi Koshimura
Note: pp. 835-838
Korean Records of a Probable Tsunami in the Japan Sea in May 1415
Abstract
Kentaro Hattori
Paper: pp. 839-851
Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment Considering the Sequence of the First and Second Earthquakes Along the Nankai Trough
Abstract
Yuyu Jiao and Nobuoto Nojima
Paper: pp. 852-858
Disaster Preparedness Using Local Wisdom Approach in Palu City
Abstract
Muhammad Rusydi, Yutdam Mudin, Rahmawati, and Sabhan
Paper: pp. 859-867
Applicability of a Modified I-D Method for Predicting Slope Failure to Different Slopes
Abstract
Toru Danjo and Tomohiro Ishizawa
Paper: pp. 868-876
Stochastic Precipitation Model Using Large Ensemble Data
Abstract
Mizuki Shinohara and Masaru Inatsu
Note: pp. 877-883
Building Quality-Oriented Societies in Asia Through Effective Water-Related Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation
Abstract
Mikio Ishiwatari, Firdaus Ali, Guillermo Q. Tabios III, Joo-Heon Lee, and Hirotaka Matsuki
Paper: pp. 884-894
Generating Diverse Optimal Road Management Plans in Post-Disaster by Applying Envelope Multi-Objective Deep Reinforcement Learning
Abstract
Soo-Hyun Joo, Yoshiki Ogawa, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
Paper: pp. 895-910
Estimation of Spatial Snowpack Properties in a Snow-Avalanche Release Area: An Extreme Case on Mt. Nodanishoji, Japan, in 2021
Abstract
Yuta Katsuyama, Takafumi Katsushima, Satoru Adachi, and Yukari Takeuchi
Material: pp. 911-917
Arrangements for Telephone Consultation on Radiation Health Effects in a Nuclear Emergency in Japan: Lessons Learned from the Nuclear Accident in Fukushima, Japan, 2011
Abstract
Hiroshi Okuno, Takeshi Kawakami, Fumitaka Watanabe, and Hidehiko Horikoshi
Survey Report: pp. 918-923
Impact Resistance Test of Cladding by Using Gravel
Abstract
Takashi Maruyama and Masato Iguchi
Paper: pp. 924-931
Health Literacy of the Elderly During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study
Abstract
Weerayut Muenboonme, Pachanat Nunthaitaweekul, and Bhichit Rattakul

No.7

(Oct)

Special Issue on ICoE Taipei Integrated Research on Disaster Risk
Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2023

Special Issue on ICoE Taipei Integrated Research on Disaster Risk

Editorial: pp. 689-690
ICoE Taipei Integrated Research on Disaster Risk
Jian-Cheng Lee, Chung-Pai Chang, Haruo Hayashi, and Hongey Chen

Established in 2010 as an integrated research program for disaster risk reduction, the IRDR ICoE Taipei is co-sponsored by the International Science Council (ISC) and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR). In the past decade, the IRDR ICoE Taipei has received hundreds of participants around the world to the more than a dozen international training workshops (AI, Advanced Institute) it has organized. These workshops focused mostly on the capacity building program for disaster risk reduction. Bearing this in mind, one important motivation for this Special Issue was to encourage the participants of each Advanced Institute, in particular those who were awarded Seed Grants to conduct one-year projects following each workshop, to publish the results of their studies on the topics related to disaster risk reduction.

In this Special Issue, the first paper provides a brief review of the capacity building program of the IRDR ICoE Taipei, followed by three research articles. Viola van Onselen and her co-workers in Taiwan present a methodology of strategies of ecosystem-based disaster risk reduction, with several case studies in coastal environments of Taiwan. Shyamli Singh of India proposes an integrated system for sustainable rice economics linking from farm to market, a case study on one of the largest rice production fields on the Indo-Gangetic plain. From the engineering perspective, Wen-Yi Huang and his colleagues in Taiwan and Australia present a paper dealing with the reinforcement of soil walls to prevent geohazards on the roads.

This is the first special issue produced as a collaboration between the IRDR ICoE Taipei and the JDR, with great support from the National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR) and Academia Sinica of Taiwan. We hope there will be more Special Issues to come in the next few years.

Review: pp. 691-699
Capacity Building for Disaster Risk Reduction: A Long-Term Program of the IRDR International Centre of Excellence at Taipei (ICoE-Taipei)
Abstract
Jian-Cheng Lee, Chung-Pai Chang, and Ying Liao
Paper: pp. 700-707
Assessment of Ecosystem-Based Disaster Risk Reduction Strategies in Coastal Environments of Taiwan
Abstract
Viola van Onselen, Mucahid Mustafa Bayrak, and Tsung-Yi Lin
Paper: pp. 708-714
Potential of Rice-Based Food Processing Industries Along Eastern Plains of River Ganga
Abstract
Shyamli Singh
Paper: pp. 715-728
Failure Mechanism and Deformation-Based Design of Narrow Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil Walls
Abstract
Wen-Yi Hung, Truong-Nhat-Phuong Pham, and Susannah Boer

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2023

Editorial: p. 729
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2023
Kaoru Takara and Shin Aoi

We are very pleased to publish this Special Issue, NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2023, which includes three papers and one tutorial.

The first paper, authored by Dhakal and Kunugi, presents the orientation changes that earthquake movements have caused in the accelerometers of a seafloor observation network for earthquakes and tsunamis along the Japan Trench (S-net). This study is expected to contribute to more accurate analyses of S-net data. The second and third papers are reports of research done on volcanoes. The paper by Tanada and Ueda presents the seismic activity of the Nasudake volcano through the use of NIED hypocenter data gathered from 1998 to 2022. Tanada and Ueda state that earthquakes have regularly occurred near the Chausudake lava dome and two craters and that, from the volcano disaster-prevention point of view, it is important to monitor the relationship between this seismic area and volcanic activity. The third paper, by Miyagi et al., reports on an experiment aimed at grasping the movement of climbers and sharing the level of disaster threat with climber-related organizations in real time. Their online visualization system for the movement of climbers helps to provide solutions to problems related to volcanic disaster prevention not only during disaster events but also in the periods between. The last paper is a tutorial by Hanashima and Usuda on “SIP4D-ZIP,” which is a standard for synthesizing and sharing common information from multiple organizations. This tutorial explains how to realize a versatile and automatic mutual data sharing and usage system for various kinds of necessary disaster information.

In conjunction with the fourth 7-year mid/long term plan period 2016-2022, NIED has published seven special issues since 2017, including this 2023 issue. We believe that the articles in these seven issues can contribute to the advancement of science and technology for disaster risk reduction and resilience.

Paper: pp. 730-739
Analysis of Orientation Changes of S-Net Accelerometers due to Earthquake Motions
Abstract
Yadab P. Dhakal and Takashi Kunugi
Paper: pp. 740-753
The Seismic Activity of the Nasudake Volcano Using Hypocenter Data (1998–2022) from the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience
Abstract
Toshikazu Tanada and Hideki Ueda
Paper: pp. 754-762
Consideration for Solving Problems Related to Volcanic Disaster Prevention by Real-Time Grasping of Climber Movement
Abstract
Yousuke Miyagi, Kazushiro Yoshimori, Shigeharu Kaneta, and Yuichiro Usuda
Tutorial: pp. 763-769
Disaster Information Sharing Technology Among Heterogeneous Information Systems Through SIP4D-ZIP Framework
Abstract
Makoto Hanashima and Yuichiro Usuda

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 771-782
Adolescents’ Responses to the 2017 Puebla Earthquake in Mexico City
Abstract
Jaime Santos-Reyes and Tatiana Gouzeva
Paper: pp. 783-795
Public Perceptions of the Aral Sea Disaster in Uzbekistan
Abstract
Steven Lloyd, Tetsuya Nakamura, and Satoru Masuda
Paper: pp. 796-805
Estimation of Sales Decline Risk Based on COVID-19 as a Model
Abstract
Katsumasa Ohori
Paper: pp. 806-813
Implementation of Hydrological Model for the Malino Catchment Area in South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia
Abstract
Ayuko Hirani Saleh, Akira Tai, Shinichiro Yano, and Mukhsan Putra Hatta

No.6

(Sep)

Special Issue on the 100th Anniversary of the Great Kanto Earthquake

Special Issue on the 100th Anniversary of the Great Kanto Earthquake

Editorial: pp. 553-554
the 100th Anniversary of the Great Kanto Earthquake
Haruo Hayashi and Shunichi Koshimura

On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake struck the Tokyo metropolitan area of Japan. It was an extremely powerful earthquake that caused a great fire. The death toll reached approximately 105,000, and the economic loss is estimated to have exceeded 30% of the Japanese gross national product at that time.

For September 2023, the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) has planned a special issue to commemorate 100 years since the Great Kanto Earthquake. While previous special issues by the JDR have focused on specific disasters, this special issue will focus on the lessons and findings from the catastrophe and will cover even the progress of disaster research since then. We received fourteen important and thought-provoking manuscripts not only on scientific and engineering aspects but also on social and cultural aspects, including comparisons with other disasters, historical views, reconstruction issues, and future perspectives. These fourteen articles can be categorized into the three groups described below.

The first four articles are the English translations of articles that originally appeared in “Koho Bosai,” the bimonthly journal on natural disaster reduction that is complied and published by the Disaster Management Section, Cabinet Office, Government of Japan. The JDR believes that these four articles provide a concise English description of various aspects of the Great Kanto Earthquake disasters. Dr. Takemura summarizes the seismic features of the 1923 Kanto Earthquake. Dr. Sekizawa summarizes the large scale urban fires that it caused. Dr. Suzuki describes various aspects of the emergency responses. Dr. Murosaki details the recovery project in Tokyo. Those articles discussed various lessons learned from the 1923 Kanto Earthquake and emphasized the importance of transferring the lessons toward future disaster mitigation.

The next six papers were originally works studying various aspects of the Great Kanto Earthquake disasters. Dr. Midorikawa reviews the strong ground motion of the 1923 Kanto Earthquake. Dr. Kaneko evaluates the resulting tsunami. Mr. Mammen sheds new light on the relationshi...<more>

Material: pp. 555-557
1923 Great Kanto Earthquake: Damages by the Quake and Tsunami
Abstract
Masayuki Takemura
Material: pp. 558-561
1923 Great Kanto Earthquake: Fire Damage and Lessons Learned
Abstract
Ai Sekizawa
Material: pp. 562-565
September 1st, 1923: The Great Kanto Earthquake (1) and (2)
Abstract
Jun Suzuki
Material: pp. 566-569
September 1st, 1923: The Great Kanto Earthquake (3) and (4)
Abstract
Yoshiteru Murosaki
Review: pp. 570-577
Strong Ground Motion of the 1923 Kanto, Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Saburoh Midorikawa
Survey Report: pp. 578-589
Evaluation of Tsunami Disasters Caused by the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake
Abstract
Hiroyuki Kaneko
Paper: pp. 590-597
Charles A. Beard, Shinpei Goto, and “The Light of Western Experience”
Abstract
David Mammen
Paper: pp. 598-610
Voices of Foreign Residents in Yokohama and Tokyo at the Time of the 1923 Kanto Earthquake
Abstract
Paola Albini and Kenji Satake
Paper: pp. 611-631
Reconsideration of Urbanization in Tokyo Metropolitan Area Since 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake from the Perspective of Exposure
Abstract
Osamu Murao, Kyota Fujiwara, Haruna Kato, Fumitake Yonemura, Keiko Inagaki, and Kimiro Meguro
Paper: pp. 632-648
The Great Kanto Earthquake and the Tokyo Electric Light Company, Inc.: Moral Hazards Exacerbated by the Great Kanto Earthquake
Abstract
Rihito Shima
Review: pp. 649-655
Repositioning Earthquake Risk Reduction: Implications to Global Risk Landscape
Abstract
Rajib Shaw
Paper: pp. 656-665
Formulation of Dissemination Process of Phase-Free Concept for Effective Promotion of Disaster Prevention Education: A Case Study of Naruto City, Japan
Abstract
Aki Shimbo, Amna Javed, Hideomi Gokon, and Youji Kohda
Paper: pp. 666-673
Significance of Medium-Wave AM Radio Broadcasting for Enhanced Disaster Resilience in Japan: A Case Study in the Kanto Region and Fukui Using Nonpowered Hoop-Shaped Radio
Abstract
Eiichi Shoji
Note: pp. 674-677
Consideration of Sustainable Risk Communication Method for 2014 Hiroshima Landslides
Abstract
Rie Yamaguchi

No.5

(Aug)

Special Issue on Trans-Disciplinary Approach (TDA) and Decision Making on Building Disaster Resilience

Special Issue on Trans-Disciplinary Approach (TDA) and Decision Making on Building Disaster Resilience

Editorial: p. 455
Trans-Disciplinary Approach (TDA) and Decision Making on Building Disaster Resilience
Mikio Ishiwatari, Kenichi Tsukahara, and Kuniyoshi Takeuchi

A transdisciplinary approach (TDA) for disaster risk reduction (DRR) is an inclusive and collaborative implementation strategy that brings together stakeholders from various disciplines and sectors. TDA facilitates the collective efforts of diverse stakeholders, encouraging them to work together to co-produce and co-implement solutions that reduce disaster risks. Technical Committee 21, “Transdisciplinary approach for building societal resilience to disasters (TC21),” was established as a technical committee of the Asian Civil Engineering Coordinating Council in 2016. TC21 has been engaged in international collaborative research activities aimed at mitigating water-related disasters by introducing scientific, knowledge-based decision making using the TDA.

This special issue features four case studies that analyze DRR efforts through the lens of the TDA. One such case covers Xinshan Village in Taiwan, which sustained devastating impacts from Typhoon Morakot in 2009. Through collaborative efforts involving all levels of government, residents, academia, and specialists, the village successfully prevented there being any casualties. The second study focuses on the Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program in Japan, a program which is developing disaster risk information systems through collaboration with local municipalities. These systems play crucial disaster management roles on the ground. The third study examines the mechanisms of cost- and responsibility-sharing for disaster management, developed by Japan and the US, and highlights the importance of collaboration and shared accountability in building resilient societies. The fourth study analyzes statement publications at the UN Global Platform for DRR and finds that the number of member states publishing official statements is decreasing.

The findings of these articles demonstrate that collaboration, technology, and investment is crucial for DRR and that these areas can be developed through the TDA. By fostering collaboration, embracing technology, and investing in resilient solutions, stakeholders can collectively build more resilient societies.

Note: pp. 456-461
Transdisciplinary Approach Toward Preparedness in a Mountainous Community in Central Taiwan and its Impact on Disaster Evacuation: A Case Study
Abstract
Ting-Chi Tsao and Chen-Yu Chen
Material: pp. 462-466
The Transdisciplinary Approach to Developing an Integrated Water-Related Disaster Information System for Municipalities
Abstract
Kenichi Tsukahara
Paper: pp. 467-474
Who Pays? Cost-Sharing for Disaster Management in the US and Japan
Abstract
Mikio Ishiwatari, Daniel P. Aldrich, and Daisuke Sasaki
Paper: pp. 475-483
How Does the Central Government Make a Remark in the International Arena of Disaster Risk Reduction? Focusing on the Frequency of Statement Publication at the UN Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Yuta Hara, Daisuke Sasaki, and Yuichi Ono

Regular Papers

Survey Report: pp. 485-491
Establishment of Training System to Cope with Mental Health and Social Issues in Disaster Recovery Public Housing After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Masatsugu Orui
Material: pp. 492-512
E-Defense Shake Table Experiments Implemented by NIED and Collaborative Research Projects in 2005–2022
Abstract
Ryota Nishi, Yohsuke Kawamata, Ryuta Enokida, Takahito Inoue, and Kentaro Tabata
Paper: pp. 513-523
Implementing Area Business Continuity Management for Large-Scale Disaster: A Total Interpretive Structural Modeling Approach
Abstract
Kunruthai Meechang and Kenji Watanabe
Paper: pp. 524-530
The Effect of the Kumamoto Earthquakes on the Increase of Burglaries
Abstract
Hideo Okamoto, Toyoji Saito, Atsuhiro Utsunomiya, Yukio Okada, and Anna Matsukawa
Paper: pp. 531-542
Spatial Layout and Accessibility Evaluation of COVID-19 Vaccination Sites Based on Three Optimization Models: A Case Study of Tianhe District, Guangzhou
Abstract
Danni Wang, Peihua Liu, Ziqian Xu, Chongyang Wang, Yun Song, Jinghong Zhang, Kunneng Jiang, and Beiqing Zhu

No.4

(Jun)

Special Issue on Development of Integrated Expert System for Estimation and Observation of Damage Level of Infrastructure in Lima Metropolitan Area

Special Issue on Development of Integrated Expert System for Estimation and Observation of Damage Level of Infrastructure in Lima Metropolitan Area

Editorial: p. 297
Development of Integrated Expert System for Estimation and Observation of Damage Level of Infrastructure in Lima Metropolitan Area
Koichi Kusunoki

Earthquakes and tsunami disasters happen suddenly, devastating cities in just a few minutes. For decision makers to manage such disasters, they need current information on the status of their cities, but all information is collected separately and on paper now. All disaster-related information should be integrated to support decision making. To develop such an integrated system, Peru and Japan launched a new SATREPS project, “Development of Integrated Expert System for Estimation and Observation of Damage Level of Infrastructure in Lima Metropolitan Area,” in 2021. The project consists of four groups. Group 1 is related to earthquake and tsunami hazards, estimating the level of shaking and predicting the damage due to tsunami. Group 2 is related to damage detection/estimation, using sensing devices to estimate the level of damage to buildings and other infrastructure. Group 3 is related to understanding the damage over a wide area through satellite images, and also to the integration of all information from Groups 1 to 3. Group 4 is related to developing the capacity to utilize the integrated expert system. This special issue has been organized to present the progress accomplished in the first two years and to share the project’s achievements. It covers the fields of earthquake hazards, building and infrastructure damage estimation, damage estimation with satellite imagery, and human loss estimation.

Paper: pp. 298-307
Assessment of Site Amplification Factors in Southern Lima, Peru Based on Microtremor H/V Spectral Ratios and Deep Neural Network
Abstract
Hiroyuki Miura, Carlos Gonzales, Miguel Diaz, Miguel Estrada, Fernando Lazares, Zenon Aguilar, Da Pan, and Masashi Matsuoka
Paper: pp. 308-318
Seismicity Based Maximum Magnitude Estimation of Subduction Earthquakes in Peru
Abstract
Juan Carlos Tarazona, Zenon Aguilar, Nelson Pulido, Carlos Gonzales, Fernando Lazares, and Hiroe Miyake
Paper: pp. 319-328
Preliminary System for the Estimation of Peak Ground Acceleration Distribution in Metropolitan Lima and Callao: Application in Recent Seismic Events
Abstract
Carlos Gonzales, Roger Garay, Luis Moya, Fernando Lazares, Zenon Aguilar, Diana Calderon, Miguel Diaz, Masashi Matsuoka, and Carlos Zavala
Paper: pp. 329-337
Characterization of the Structural Typologies of Buildings in the Lima Metropolitan Area
Abstract
Miguel Diaz, Carlos Zavala, Miguel Estrada, and Masashi Matsuoka
Paper: pp. 338-349
Wavelet Transform Method for the Evaluation of the Seismic Response of One Isolated Building in the Lima Metropolitan Area
Abstract
Joseph Jaramillo, Miguel Diaz, Carlos Zavala, Koichi Kusunoki, Italo Inocente, and Danty Otero
Paper: pp. 350-358
Analysis of Adaptive Pushover in Confined Masonry Dwellings with Height Irregularity in the Lima Metropolitan Area
Abstract
Miguel Diaz, Carlos Zavala, Luis Lopez, and Michel Amancio
Paper: pp. 359-365
Estimation of the Restoration Period of the Water Supply System in Lima, Peru, After a Scenario Earthquake
Abstract
Yoshihisa Maruyama, Ryo Ichimoto, Nobuoto Nojima, Italo Inocente, Jorge Gallardo, and Luis Quiroz
Paper: pp. 366-378
Earthquake Damage Assessment of Buried Pipeline Networks in the Lima Metropolitan Area
Abstract
Italo Inocente, Miguel Diaz, Jorge Gallardo, Yoshihisa Maruyama, Luis Quiroz, and Carlos Zavala
Paper: pp. 379-387
Revising the 2007 Peru Earthquake Damage Monitoring Using Machine Learning Models and Satellite Imagery
Abstract
Bruno Adriano, Hiroyuki Miura, Wen Liu, Masashi Matsuoka, Eduardo Portuguez, Miguel Diaz, and Miguel Estrada
Paper: pp. 388-396
In Challenge of Approaching Casualties and Injured People Due to a Damaging Earthquake
Abstract
Carlos Zavala, Miguel Diaz, and Francisco Ríos

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 397-414
“What if the Nankai Trough Earthquake Occurred?”: A Collaboration Between Academia with the Media Using a Newspaper-Making Workshop as a Starting Point to Engage Elementary School Students and Their Parents in Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Natsuko Chubachi, Kumiko Konno, Yo Fukushima, and Takeshi Sato
Paper: pp. 415-423
The Importance of Family and Community Approach in Reducing the Risk Faced by the Elderly During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Abstract
Deny Hidayati, Widayatun, and Augustina Situmorang
Paper: pp. 424-435
Assessment of Landslide Risks Through a Multi-Disciplinary Approach: A Case Study of Al Hoceima, Northern Morocco
Abstract
Mohamed El Khattabi, Jamal El Khattabi, Ali Azdimousa, Pierre Plotto, and Gharibi El Khadir
Paper: pp. 436-446
Practicing Rescue Plans of Vietnamese Firefighters: Situation and Solutions
Abstract
Hung Le Tien, Nam Pham Van, and Takaaki Kato

No.3

(Apr)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 199-208
Application of Stress Parameter from Liquefaction Analysis on the Landslide Induced Tsunami Simulation: A Case Study of the 2018 Palu Tsunami
Abstract
Karina Aprilia Sujatmiko, Koji Ichii, Soichiro Murata, and Iyan Eka Mulia
Survey Report: pp. 209-216
A Questionnaire Survey of the Mental Health of Japanese Expatriates in China During the COVID-19 Epidemic in 2021
Abstract
Yukari Kamei and Atsuo Hamada
Paper: pp. 217-232
Proposal of a Recommended Correspondence Method for Companies and Organizations in Case of Partial Rupture of the Nankai Trough Earthquake
Abstract
Hiroaki Maruya, Tetsuya Torayashiki, Hiroyuki Sasaki, and Fumihiko Imamura
Paper: pp. 233-245
The Anticipated Nankai Trough Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan: Determinant Factors of Residents’ Pre-Event Evacuation Intentions
Abstract
Kanan Hirano, Yo Fukushima, Hiroaki Maruya, Motoyuki Kido, and Motoaki Sugiura
Paper: pp. 246-260
Estimation of House Cleanup Work Volume Based on Disaster Volunteer Center Work Management Data —The Case of the 2015 Joso City—
Abstract
Yoshinobu Mizui and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
Paper: pp. 261-269
Analysis of Land Price Changes Before and After Designation as Tsunami Disaster Alert Areas
Abstract
Jun Sakamoto
Paper: pp. 270-279
Assessment of Hydraulic Fracturing in Earth Dams on Complex Foundations
Abstract
Bunpoat Kunsuwan, Thawatchai Chalermpornchai, Warakorn Mairaing, and Wiphada Thepjanthra
Survey Report: pp. 280-286
How a Household Survived a Natural Hazard-Triggered Blackout with Photovoltaic and Battery Energy System: A Report of 2018 Hokkaido Eastern Iburi Earthquake in Japan
Abstract
Hitomu Kotani and Kazuyoshi Nakano

No.2

(Feb)

MURAKAMI Suminao Award 2022 and the JDR Annual Awards 2022
Mini Special Issue on Modeling of Human-Policy-Technology Nexus and Simulation for Disaster Response and Business Continuity

MURAKAMI Suminao Award 2022 and the JDR Annual Awards 2022

Award: pp. 77-78
Congratulations! MURAKAMI Suminao Award for Disaster Research 2022 and the JDR Annual Awards 2022
Editor-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
Award: p. 79
Presenting the MURAKAMI Suminao Award 2022
Sumio Shinoda
Award: p. 80
Message from the Winner
Hideaki Karaki
Award: p. 81
Message from the Winner
Wen Liu
Award: p. 82
Message from the Winner
Narumi Takahashi
Award: p. 83
Message from the Winner
Takuya Tsugawa
Award: p. 84
Message from the Winner
Nobuyuki Morikawa

Mini Special Issue on Modeling of Human-Policy-Technology Nexus and Simulation for Disaster Response and Business Continuity

Editorial: pp. 87-88
Modeling of Human-Policy-Technology Nexus and Simulation for Disaster Response and Business Continuity
Taro Kanno, Daisuke Karikawa, Hidenori Fujino, and Chie Ishida

We, as guest editors, are honored to have been given the opportunity to organize this mini special issue on “Modeling of Human-Policy-Technology Nexus and Simulation for Disaster Response and Business Continuity” for the Journal of Disaster Research. This mini special issue aims to contribute to the overcoming of challenges around better design, operation, and management for disaster response and business continuity, where various factors, including human behavior and decision-making, policy and prioritization, monetary and humanitarian costs, and technological and infrastructural constraints, are intertwined, making it difficult to comprehend the entire picture and find an optimal solution.

On the other hand, we firmly believe people have an essential role in disaster response and business continuity. However, unlike physical phenomena, there are no governing equations or laws for human behavior and decision-making; there are variations and inconsistencies in human modeling depending on whether what was done, what ought to be done, what can be done, etc. is being modeled. Sometimes, human behavior must be considered and the different modes of human models clearly distinguished when better socio-technical systems or other systems involving humans are discussed.

All the papers selected introduce the latest innovative research in modeling and simulation, training system design, and quantitative and qualitative data analysis, which are directly and indirectly applicable to a better design, operation, and the management of disaster response and business continuity. At the same time, these papers also focus on one or several aspects of human behavior modes, such as past and current evidence (descriptive model) and what persons or organizations are supposed to be (normative model). The collection of these papers is expected to give good insight and inspiration to the readers and those who may take on the challenges this special issue aims to provide and to help develop an understanding of the importance of a human-centric approach to disaster research.

Paper: pp. 89-103
Co-Evolution Framework Between Humans and Simulations: Planning Post-Disaster Restoration of a Water Distribution Network
Abstract
Shunichi Tada, Kento Wakayama, Taro Kanno, Yuji Kawase, and Kazuo Furuta
Paper: pp. 104-113
Modeling and Simulation of In-Hospital Disaster Medicine in a Mass Casualty Event for the Resilience Evaluation of BCPs
Abstract
Mizuki Umemoto, Shunsuke Kadono, Taro Kanno, Kazumi Kajiyama, Sachika Sharikura, Ryoko Ikari, Masashi Yoneyama, and Sheuwen Chuang
Survey Report: pp. 114-123
Report on the Project on the Implementation of Continuity Operations in Disaster-Affected Healthcare Facilities Using Gensai Calendar HDMG and COOP Flow Diagram
Abstract
Yasushi Nakajima, Akane Yoshida, and Tsuyoshi Kato
Paper: pp. 124-136
Current Situation of the Business Continuity Plan Preparation in Japan: Community General Support Centers
Abstract
Aya Iguchi, Chie Ishida, Taichi Sato, Risa Okada, Takayuki Kanesaka, and Taro Kanno
Paper: pp. 137-150
Collective Knowledge and Experience for Resource-Focused Business Continuity Plans Foundation: Survey on How Home-Visit Nursing Operators in Japan Coped with the COVID-19 Pandemic
Abstract
Taro Kanno, Mizuki Umemoto, Chie Ishida, Aya Iguchi, Risa Okada, and Takayuki Kanesaka

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 151-161
Development of Prototype Volcano Information Portal Website (VIP) for the Municipalities’ Disaster Response
Abstract
Tomohiro Kubo, Yousuke Miyagi, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Ryo Honda, and Yasuhiro Ishimine
Paper: pp. 162-177
Public Evaluation of the Reconstruction and Regeneration of Fukushima 10 Years After the Earthquake
Abstract
Tetsuya Nakamura, Steven Lloyd, Atsushi Maruyama, and Satoru Masuda
Paper: pp. 178-189
Rapid Estimation of Direct Economic Losses Caused by Significant Earthquakes: An Evidence-Based Model and its Applications
Abstract
Toshihisa Toyoda, Qinglin Cui, Masaki Ikeda, Hiromitsu Nakamura, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara

No.1

(Jan)

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics Part 3

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics Part 3

Editorial: p. 3
COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics Part 3
Sumio Shinoda, Yasuhiro Yoshikawa, and Haruo Hayashi

Three years have passed since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China. The pandemic rapidly spread worldwide, especially through Europe and the Americas.

The Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) edited its “Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics, Part 1 and Part 2” at the end of 2020 and 2021, and their electronic versions were published in January 2021 (JDR Vol.16, No.1, pp. 1-117) and January 2022 (JDR Vol.17, No.1, pp. 1-158), respectively.

However, the pandemic is still continued and not yet eradicated. The cumulative number of cases of COVID-19 worldwide, as released in the World Health Organization (WHO) Weekly Epidemiological Update was 260 million as of December 2021. We therefore planned for the publication of this Special Issue Part 3 and called for papers.

This Special Issue Part 3 includes nine manuscripts, which deal from various fields related to COVID-19, such as including vaccine rollout program, the role of social media, problems in school education, therapeutic agents, virology, and general epidemiology. This suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic is a complicated disaster.

In December 2022, the global number of cumulative cases have increased to 940 million, almost one-tenth of the world’s population, although this number includes many asymptomatic infections. On the contrary, the number of new COVID-19 cases has slowed of mildness in the American and European countries in the year 2022, yet there has been a conspicuous increase in newly reported cases in Asia, especially in the Republic of Korea and Japan. Although the cases from African countries have still continued to report fewer numbers of cases than the number from other areas, However, there is still some possibility of that this is because of a lower number of medicinal tests, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, are given in African countries. If this is the reason, future increases of the medicinal tests in Africa may cause result in undesirable increases of in the number of cases therein African counties.

We are hopeful that the COVID-1...<more>

Paper: pp. 4-10
Infectivity of Omicron BA.5 Comparison with Original Strain and Other Mutated Strain of SARS-CoV-2 in Japan
Abstract
Junko Kurita, Tamie Sugawara, and Yasushi Ohkusa
Paper: pp. 11-20
Strategic Roadmapping Framework for Disaster Response: Case of COVID-19 Pandemic Vaccine Rollout Program in the UK
Abstract
Yuna Yang, Sukrit Vinayavekhin, Robert Phaal, Eoin O’Sullivan, and Natt Leelawat
Note: pp. 21-26
A Brief Questionnaire on Healthcare Workers’ Awareness Toward the COVID-19 Vaccine and Antibody Tests
Abstract
Noriko Shimasaki, Junko Ishii, Tomoko Kuwahara, and Haruna Nishijima
Review: pp. 27-33
Lactoferrin as a Possible Preventive and Therapeutic Agent Against SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Abstract
Michiyo Kobayashi-Sakamoto, Toyonobu Maeda, Junko Yusa, Hideki Tani, Yasumasa Kato, and Kimiharu Hirose
Paper: pp. 34-39
Risk Communication During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Era of Social Media
Abstract
Changchun Feng and Kabilijiang Umaier
Paper: pp. 40-47
Inter- and Intrastate Network Analysis of COVID-19 Spread Using the Social Connectedness Index
Abstract
Jing Tang, Napatee Yaibuates, Theerat Tassanai, and Natt Leelawat
Note: pp. 48-56
Life and Stress of Japanese Children and Adolescents During the Prolonged Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic
Abstract
Junko Okuyama, Shuji Seto, Yu Fukuda, Kiyoshi Ito, Fumihiko Imamura, Shunichi Funakoshi, and Shin-Ichi Izumi
Paper: pp. 57-68
Information Seeking and COVID-19 Preventive Behaviors: A Comparison Between Immigrants and the Host Population in Japan
Abstract
Yuanyuan Teng, Tomoya Hanibuchi, and Tomoki Nakaya
Review: pp. 69-74
Brief Epidemiological Consideration on the COVID-19 Pandemic
Abstract
Sumio Shinoda

Vol.17 (2022)

No.7

(Dec)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 1115-1126
Which Mode Will Be Effective in a Massive Evacuation?
Abstract
Jun Lee and Jae Hun Kim
Paper: pp. 1127-1139
Effectiveness of an Elevated Road in Reducing Inundation Area of the Coast of Palu, Sulawesi, Indonesia
Abstract
Muhammad Rizki Purnama, Mohammad Bagus Adityawan, Mohammad Farid, and Asrini Chrysanti
Paper: pp. 1140-1149
Hybrid Scheme of Kinematic Analysis and Lagrangian Koopman Operator Analysis for Short-Term Precipitation Forecasting
Abstract
Shitao Zheng, Takashi Miyamoto, Koyuru Iwanami, Shingo Shimizu, and Ryohei Kato
Paper: pp. 1150-1157
Integrating Health Considerations into Local Level Recovery Planning: An Exploration of Florida’s Recovery and Redevelopment Plans
Abstract
Megan Archer, Katherine Pedersen, Mallory Kennedy, and Nicole A. Errett
Letter: pp. 1158-1164
Tele Health Self-Management (THSM) Innovation for Patients with COVID-19: A Conceptual Design
Abstract
Pachanat Nunthaitaweekul, Natt Leelawat, Suparp Thaithae, Weerayut Muenboonme, Kodchakorn Krutphong, Kunch Ringrod, and Jing Tang
Paper: pp. 1165-1182
Public Attitudes Toward Decontamination and Regional Regeneration: A Case Study of Hanford Site in Washington
Abstract
Tetsuya Nakamura, Steven Lloyd, Atsushi Maruyama, and Satoru Masuda
Review: pp. 1183-1191
Social Causes of Dzuds in Mongolia Since the 1990s
Abstract
Ariunaa Chadraabal, Urjin Odkhuu, Masato Shinoda, and Yasuhiro Suzuki
Paper: pp. 1192-1198
An Inclusive Model for the Urban Search and Rescue Teams (USAR)
Abstract
Amaly Fong Lee and Adan Vega Saenz
Paper: pp. 1199-1205
Cooperation Among Public Health Nurses in Municipalities and at Public Health Centers for Infection Control at Evacuation Shelters
Abstract
Junko Kurita and Shinobu Yamaguchi

No.6

(Oct)

Special Issue on SATREPS Area-BCM Part 2
Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2022

Special Issue on SATREPS Area-BCM Part 2

Editorial: pp. 851-852
SATREPS Area-BCM Part 2
Kenji Watanabe and Natt Leelawat

This special issue includes works related to the ongoing project “Regional Resilience Enhancement through Establishment of Area-BCM at Industry Complexes in Thailand.” This special issue can be considered evidence that the research and development of this project follows and supports the sustainable development goals (SDGs). Let’s imagine we are taking a tour of Area-Business Continuity Management (Area-BCM) and SDGs together.

As a starter, the baseline concept of our Area-BCM is discussed (Kodaka et al.) followed by the papers focusing on the specific SDGs.

Toward SDG Goal 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities

We can start the tour with this goal, as it is the project’s primary focus. In order to have sustainable cities and communities, the concept of Area-BCM can be considered. Related to it, there is a study that reviews and suggests the critical success factors (Meechang and Watanabe). Moreover, we can see the possibility of extending the concept of business continuity to other service sectors, such as tourism during COVID-19 (Yudha et al.).

Toward SDG Goal 8 Decent Work and Economic Growth

Let’s move to the next goal. There is a study exploring the well-being of working people and its likelihood among the local people in the community (Duangkaew et al.). People can be considered human resources in the Area-BCM. Accordingly, learning how people fared during a disaster allows us to design the suitable Area-BCM strategies for organizations. With sustainable employment aspects, inundation model for industrial park-scale is proposed for decision making regarding business continuity (Kakinuma et al.). And a practical model for shared risk assessment within multi-stakeholder is discussed for decision as a community (Ono).

Toward SDG Goal 13 Climate Action

Regarding the third goal, it is necessary to know the outcome of hazard analysis for us to understand the risks. Thus, an approach to flood hazard mapping using the Rainfall-Runoff-Inundation model is presented (Sriariyawat et al.). Through various techniques, flood...<more>

Note: pp. 853-860
Industrial Area Business Continuity Management Exercise: An Experimental Validation for Flood in Thailand
Abstract
Akira Kodaka, Natt Leelawat, Kenji Watanabe, Jaehyun Park, Jing Tang, Eri Ino, and Naohiko Kohtake
Note: pp. 861-863
How BCPs Have Changed – Case Study from COVID-19
Abstract
Takahiro Ono
Paper: pp. 864-876
An Approach to Flood Hazard Mapping for the Chao Phraya River Basin Using Rainfall-Runoff-Inundation Model
Abstract
Anurak Sriariyawat, Bounhome Kimmany, Mamoru Miyamoto, Daiki Kakinuma, Shakti P. C., and Supattra Visessri
Paper: pp. 877-888
Development of an Inundation Model for Creating Industrial Park-Scale Risk Information for Area-BCM
Abstract
Daiki Kakinuma, Mamoru Miyamoto, Yosuke Nakamura, Anurak Sriariyawat, and Supattra Visessri
Paper: pp. 889-900
Exploring Well-Being in the Work and Livelihoods of Local People During the 2011 Flood in Thailand
Abstract
Sutpratana Duangkaew, Ruttiya Bhula-or, Sutee Anantsuksomsri, Tadashi Nakasu, Korrakot Positlimpakul, and Kullachart Prathumchai
Paper: pp. 901-912
Probable Flood Inundation Depth and Extent in the Chao Phraya River Basin for Different Return Periods
Abstract
Shakti P. C., Mamoru Miyamoto, Daiki Kakinuma, Ryohei Misumi, Anurak Sriariyawat, and Supattra Visessri
Review: pp. 913-922
COVID-19 Impact on Tourism Business Continuity in Indonesia: A Preliminary Systematic Review
Abstract
Alfan Kurnia Yudha, Jing Tang, and Natt Leelawat
Review: pp. 923-932
The Critical Success Factors of Area-Business Continuity Management: A Systematic Review and Outlooks from the Public and Private Sectors
Abstract
Kunruthai Meechang and Kenji Watanabe

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2022

Editorial: p. 933
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2022
Haruo Hayashi and Isao Kamiishi

We are very pleased to publish this special issue, dedicated to NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2022. There are four papers, two reviews, and one note in this issue.

In the last year of the NIED’s fourth mid/long term plan period, which began in 2016, natural disasters have occurred every year, including earthquake disasters such as the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (M7.3) and the 2018 Iburi, Hokkaido earthquake (M7.1). Rainfall disasters include the heavy rainfall in northern Kyushu in July 2017, southwestern Japan in July 2018, northern Kyushu in August 2019, Kanto and Tohoku in October 2019, and Kyushu in July 2020. In the summer of 2022, the heavy rainfall and extreme weather continued over Japan.

The first three papers and one note contain hazard and risk information. Dohi et al. present the development of Japan Tsunami Hazard Information Station (J-THIS), Cui et al. present a study of the estimation of damage based on analysis of SNS Information, Nakamura provides avalanche risk information, and Ise et al. note information linkage by the Shared Information Platform for Disaster Management (SIP4D). Horiuchi et al. review the contribution of the E-Defence shaking table. This special issue also includes two social science works. Nagata et al. present tsunami disaster risk reduction education programs, and Yamazaki-Honda reviews promoting coherence among disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation, and sustainable development for disaster resilience.

In the first half of the 21st century, a mega disaster such as the Nankai Trough earthquake is expected to occur. Extreme climatic events are also becoming more frequent: typhoons, floods, heavy rains and snows, landslides, and heat waves. We hope this issue provides information useful to all readers who study natural disasters.

Paper: pp. 934-943
Development of the Japan Tsunami Hazard Information Station (J-THIS)
Abstract
Yuji Dohi, Hiromitsu Nakamura, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
Paper: pp. 944-955
Early Estimation of Heavy Rain Damage at the Municipal Level Based on Time-Series Analysis of SNS Information
Abstract
Qinglin Cui, Kikuko Shoyama, Makoto Hanashima, and Yuichiro Usuda
Paper: pp. 956-975
Improvement of a Potential Estimation Algorithm for Surface Avalanches Caused by Snowfall During a Cyclone
Abstract
Kazuki Nakamura
Note: pp. 976-984
Current Status and Issues of Information Sharing in Disaster Response in Japan: Information Linkage by “SIP4D”
Abstract
Tadashi Ise, Makoto Hanashima, and Yuichiro Usuda
Review: pp. 985-999
Contributions of E-Defense Shaking Table to Earthquake Engineering and its Future
Abstract
Toshihiko Horiuchi, Makoto Ohsaki, Masahiro Kurata, Julio A. Ramirez, Takuzo Yamashita, and Koichi Kajiwara
Paper: pp. 1000-1014
Development of Tsunami Disaster Risk Reduction Education Program for Children with No Experience of Earthquake Disaster – Practice and Verification at Shichigahama Town, Miyagi Prefecture
Abstract
Toshimitsu Nagata, Masaki Ikeda, Reo Kimura, and Takashi Oda
Review: pp. 1015-1021
Promoting Coherence Among Disaster Risk Reduction, Climate Change Adaptation, and Sustainable Development for Disaster Resilience
Abstract
Ritsuko Yamazaki-Honda

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 1023-1036
Development of a Scale for Disaster-Prevention Consciousness – Structure of Disaster-Prevention Consciousness of Those Who Lack Expertise in Disaster Prevention
Abstract
Kan Shimazaki and Miki Ozeki
Paper: pp. 1037-1047
The Use of Digital Media and Modes of Communication of Affected People: A Case Study of Earthquakes in East Java, Indonesia
Abstract
Rachmah Ida, Sri Widiyantoro, Endra Gunawan, Euis Sunarti, Gayatri Indah Marliyani, and Muhammad Saud
Paper: pp. 1048-1058
Obstacles to Early Recovery and Reconstruction of the Fish Processing Industry Due to the Policy/Projects After the Great East Japan Earthquake and Countermeasures: The Case of Kesennuma City in Miyagi Prefecture
Abstract
Tetsuya Torayashiki and Hiroaki Maruya
Survey Report: pp. 1059-1067
Successive Occurrence of Large Earthquakes Along the Kuril Trench
Abstract
Tetsuo Hashimoto and Takashi Yokota
Paper: pp. 1068-1079
Factors Affecting Behavior and Behavioral Intentions of Expectant and Nursing Mothers Regarding Disaster Preparation
Abstract
Yumiko Hosokawa, Shoji Ohtomo, and Reo Kimura
Paper: pp. 1080-1089
Eruptive Volume and Age of Large-Scale Pumice Eruptions of the Asama-Maekake Volcano, Central Japan, as Revealed by Detailed Trench Surveys: Implications for Future Volcanic Hazards
Abstract
Masaki Takahashi, Maya Yasui, Tatsuo Kanamaru, and Mitsuhiro Nakagawa
Review: pp. 1090-1100
Application of Open Data in Disaster Risk Research: A Preliminary Review Using Bibliometric Analysis
Abstract
Jingyi Gao, Wei Chen, and Osamu Murao
Paper: pp. 1101-1109
Case Study on Damage and Recovery of Water Supply Related Facilities Damaged by Recent Flood Disasters
Abstract
Junichi Sakai, Takaya Onodera, and Koji Ikeuchi

No.5

(Aug)

Special Issue on Future Volcano Research in Japan: Integrated Program for Next-Generation Volcano Research

Special Issue on Future Volcano Research in Japan: Integrated Program for Next-Generation Volcano Research

Editorial: pp. 585-586
Future Volcano Research in Japan: Integrated Program for Next-Generation Volcano Research
Eisuke Fujita, Masato Iguchi, Yuichi Morita, Setsuya Nakada, Mitsuhiro Nakagawa, and Yuki Suzuki

Since Japan has 111 active volcanoes, we living there need to be prepared for the volcanic disasters that we will likely encounter in our lifetime. The Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development (INeVRH), a research project of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), started in 2016 and is now in its 7th year. It is approaching its final stage will be ready to make proposals that will improve our knowledge from both scientific and practical points of view. In theme A, the Japan Volcanic Data Network (JVDN) system started its function as a volcanic research platform, providing the observation and analysis data of many universities, governmental agencies, and institutes. The JVDN system promotes collaborative, multidisciplinary study. In theme B, many strategic observation techniques now deployed have revealed the characteristics of volcanoes in detail. For example, a dense seismic and magnetic survey has clarified the fine structure of the hydrothermal system beneath volcanoes, providing information that can be used to evaluate their phreatic eruption potential. In addition, brand-new volcanic gas observation techniques using drones now obtain in-situ information effectively. Theme C has obtained geologic and petrologic findings at many volcanoes and has come to the stage in which systematic compilation of this database would be useful to comparative studies of many volcanoes. These findings are also used in numerical simulations that combine geologic, petrologic, and geophysical formulations to produce more comprehensive models used to interpret volcanic activity. Theme D focuses on the development of practical technologies for volcanic disaster mitigation, mainly related to volcanic ash. A scheme for the quick detection and evaluation of volcanic ash is proposed through observation and numerical simulation, and an experiment is performed to reveal the thickness threshold of volcanic ash deposits on air-conditioners. This special issue reports on some up-to-date topics that could become the basis of dynamic and effective links between themes A...<more>

Paper: pp. 587-599
Identifying Anomalies in Seismic Velocity and Scattering Property Changes at Active Volcanoes Based on Seismic Interferometry and the Local Outlier Probability Method
Abstract
Takashi Hirose, Hideki Ueda, and Eisuke Fujita
Paper: pp. 600-608
Construction and Provision of Digital Photographic Archives by Using the Japan Volcanological Data Network System: Application to the 1990–1995 Mount Unzen Eruption Disaster
Abstract
Yuhki Kohno, Hideki Ueda, and Setsuya Nakada
Paper: pp. 609-619
Development of Portable SAR for Detection of Volcano Deformation: Application of SAR Interferometry to the Repeated Observation Data
Abstract
Taku Ozawa, Yuji Himematsu, Akira Nohmi, and Masanori Miyawaki
Paper: pp. 620-629
A Simple Method for the Analysis of Fumarolic Gases Using Response-Adjusted Sensors with a UAV
Abstract
Kouki Matsu’ura, Akihiko Terada, Toshiya Mori, and Takato Ono
Paper: pp. 630-638
Post-Eruptive Persistent Cooling Beneath the Summit Crater of Usu Volcano as Revealed by Magnetic Repeat Surveys
Abstract
Takeshi Hashimoto
Note: pp. 639-643
Simple Graphical Pre- and Post-Processor for 3-D Magnetotelluric Inversion
Abstract
Ryo Tanaka
Paper: pp. 644-653
Magnetization Structure and its Temporal Change of Miyakejima Volcano, Japan, Revealed by Uncrewed Aerial Vehicle Aeromagnetic Survey
Abstract
Takao Koyama, Takayuki Kaneko, Takao Ohminato, Atsushi Watanabe, Yoshiaki Honda, Takahiro Akiyama, Shinichi Tanaka, Marceau Gresse, Makoto Uyeshima, and Yuichi Morita
Paper: pp. 654-662
Numerical Modeling of a Volcanic Hydrothermal System Based on Resistivity Structure
Abstract
Yasuo Matsunaga and Wataru Kanda
Paper: pp. 663-669
Fracture Structures in and Around Hakone Volcano Revealed by Dense Seismic Observations
Abstract
Ryou Honda, Yuki Abe, Yohei Yukutake, and Shin’ichi Sakai
Paper: pp. 670-682
A Half-Year Long Observation at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan Using a Multi-Channeled Seismometer System with Phase-Shifted Optical Interferometry
Abstract
Haruhisa Nakamichi, Yoshiharu Hirayama, Toshiharu Ikeda, Hiroshi Ando, and Keiji Takeuchi
Paper: pp. 683-693
Introduction to Automated Tools for the Analysis of Volcanic Ejecta Built on an Analysis Platform Developed in the INeVRH Project
Abstract
Atsushi Yasuda and Natsumi Hokanishi
Paper: pp. 694-715
Temporal Changes of Magmas That Caused Lava-Dome Eruptions of Haruna Volcano in the Past 45,000 Years
Abstract
Yuki Suzuki, Yurika Toeda, Shinya Kimura, and Rei Tanaka
Paper: pp. 716-723
Experimental Constraints on the H2O-Saturated Plagioclase Liquidus and the Storage Depth of the Izu-Oshima 1986B Basaltic Andesite Melt
Abstract
Ryoya Oida, Hidemi Ishibashi, Akihiko Tomiya, Masashi Ushioda, Natsumi Hokanishi, and Atsushi Yasuda
Paper: pp. 724-735
Late Holocene Tephrostratigraphy at Chokai Volcano, Northern Japan, and Contribution to Hazard Assessment
Abstract
Tsukasa Ohba, Shintaro Hayashi, Masao Ban, Takumi Imura, Yusuke Minami, and Masahiro Endo
Paper: pp. 736-744
Geologic and Petrologic Characteristics of the Lahar Deposits at the Western Foot of Zao Volcano
Abstract
Masao Ban, Konosuke Kawashima, Kae Tsunematsu, Takumi Imura, Kyoko S. Kataoka, and Tohru Yamanoi
Survey Report: pp. 745-753
Reexamination of Eruptive Activity of Akanfuji in the Me-Akan Volcano, Eastern Hokkaido, Japan
Abstract
Eiichi Sato, Keiji Wada, Yusuke Minami, Yoshihiro Ishizuka, and Mitsuhiro Nakagawa
Paper: pp. 754-767
Conduit Flow Dynamics During the 1986 Sub-Plinian Eruption at Izu-Oshima Volcano
Abstract
Tomofumi Kozono, Hidemi Ishibashi, Satoshi Okumura, and Takahiro Miwa
Paper: pp. 768-778
Numerical Simulations of Dome-Collapse Pyroclastic Density Currents Using faSavageHutterFOAM: Application to the 3 June 1991 Eruption of Unzen Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Hiroyuki A. Shimizu
Paper: pp. 779-790
High Precision Lava Flow Simulation Using 8K Drone Digital Elevation Data
Abstract
Eisuke Fujita, Hiroyuki A. Shimizu, and Haruhisa Nakamichi
Paper: pp. 791-804
Applying the Particle Filter to the Volcanic Ash Tracking PUFF Model for Assimilating Multi-Parameter Radar Observation
Abstract
Hiroshi L. Tanaka, Haruhisa Nakamichi, Keiichi Kondo, Shoichi Akami, and Masato Iguchi
Paper: pp. 805-817
Continuously Operable Simulator and Forecasting the Deposition of Volcanic Ash from Prolonged Eruptions at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Masato Iguchi, Haruhisa Nakamichi, Kosei Takishita, and Alexandros P. Poulidis
Paper: pp. 818-828
A Consideration on Volcanic Ash Ingress into the Horizontal Air Intake of Air Conditioning
Abstract
Kiyotoshi Otsuka, Arihide Nobata, Hitoshi Suwa, Tomohiro Kubo, Yousuke Miyagi, and Masamitsu Miyamura
Paper: pp. 829-838
Impact on the Electric Infrastructure Due to Volcanic Ash from a Hydrovolcanic Eruption of Aso Volcano in 2016
Abstract
Masashi Nagai and Setsuya Nakada
Errata: pp. 839-840
Erratum for “The Importance of Monitoring Viral Respiratory Infections During the COVID-19 Crisis” (Vol.17, pp. 73-81, 2022)
Abstract
Itsuki Hamamoto and Noriko Shimasaki

No.4

(Jun)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 507-515
Evaluation of Historical Wildfires in Tohoku Region Using Satellite-Based High-Fire-Severity Index
Abstract
Grace Puyang Emang, Yoshiya Touge, and So Kazama
Paper: pp. 516-525
Effects of Urban Development on Regional Climate Change and Flood Inundation in Jakarta, Indonesia
Abstract
Bambang Adhi Priyambodoho, Shuichi Kure, Nurul Fajar Januriyadi, Mohammad Farid, Alvin Christopher Galang Varquez, Manabu Kanda, and So Kazama
Paper: pp. 526-531
Memorialization Tools for Systematically Expanding Disaster Risk Reduction Across Space and Time
Abstract
Reid Basher and Yuichi Ono
Paper: pp. 532-540
Tsunami-Induced Drift Motion and Numerical Simulation Using Various Models
Abstract
Riko Morita, Kazuya Nojima, Yu Chida, and Taro Arikawa
Note: pp. 541-545
Scenario Planning Approach to Pre-Event Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery: The Case of the Future Mega-Tsunami Striking Kushimoto, Japan
Abstract
Tamiyo Kondo and Shogo Takemoto
Note: pp. 546-551
Impact of COVID-19 Measures on Mobility in Bangkok, Thailand
Abstract
Ampan Laosunthara, Kumpol Saengtabtim, Piyaporn Sochoeiya, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, Akira Kodaka, Yasushi Onda, and Naohiko Kohtake
Paper: pp. 552-560
Prediction of Reservoir Sedimentation in the Long Term Period Due to the Impact of Climate Change: A Case Study of Pleikrong Reservoir
Abstract
Xuan Khanh Do, Thu Hien Nguyen, Le An Ngo, Micah Lourdes Felix, and Kwansue Jung
Paper: pp. 561-572
Risk Narratives for Enhancing Regional Resilience: Constructing Evidence-Based Flood Disaster Response Scenarios
Abstract
Tadashi Nakasu, Shiro Nonaka, Sutpratana Duangkaew, Kullachart Prathumchai, Akira Kodaka, and Mamoru Miyamoto

No.3

(Apr)

Migration, Dignity, Fragility, and Pandemics
Mini Special Issue on Studies of Historical and Archaeological Materials for Disaster Research

Migration, Dignity, Fragility, and Pandemics

Editorial: pp. 283-284
Migration, Dignity, Fragility, and Pandemics
Mikiyasu Nakayama, Shanna N. McClain, Ryo Fujikura, and Daisuke Sasaki

Migration is dynamic and varies greatly across the globe due to myriad factors, including demography, economy, geography, and environment. As people move, a number of challenges exist that can leave human rights and human dignity as an afterthought to the migration process. This special issue provides a legal and policy framework for supporting “migration with dignity,” providing examples of how to apply this framework across a number of contexts, including climate change, the migration cycle, and pandemics.

COVID-19 has drastically changed mobility and migration in key spheres, such as transportation, travel, construction, and hospitality. Our research for this special issue was conducted between 2020 and 2021; therefore, we had the opportunity to witness a once-in-a-century global pandemic with direct impacts on migration inflows and outflows. Consequently, we have included pandemics as a key theme for consideration in this issue, believing that the research agenda should be informed by the assessment of impacts in both the atoll countries and in the United States – the most common “destination” of Pacific Islanders. This additional research revealed the vulnerabilities of migrants in the destination countries and in their home countries, vulnerabilities that would not otherwise have been apparent.

Our research was also directly impacted by the pandemic. We intended to conduct field research in countries such as the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), and the Republic of Maldives, with the RMI and FSM serving as countries of “origin” for migration to the United States. In the Maldives, there is a large domestic migration from the atolls to the newly constructed man-made islands. We experienced research and travel limitations due to COVID-19, where many countries have adopted strict isolation policies to prevent the spread of disease. Therefore, we had to conduct our surveys remotely using the Internet or by asking collaborators living in the area to conduct surveys on our behalf.

Our special issue also touches ...<more>

Paper: pp. 285-291
Migration, Dignity, Fragility, and Pandemics: Overview of the Special Issue
Abstract
Mikiyasu Nakayama, Shanna N. McClain, Ryo Fujikura, and Daisuke Sasaki
Paper: pp. 292-300
Migration with Dignity: A Legal and Policy Framework
Abstract
Shanna N. McClain, Carl Bruch, Erin Daly, James May, Yuko Hamada, Miko Maekawa, Nagisa Shiiba, Mikiyasu Nakayama, and Glykeria Tsiokanou
Paper: pp. 301-307
Introduction to Dignity Law
Abstract
James R. May and Erin Daly
Paper: pp. 308-314
The Methodology and Application of a Migration with Dignity Framework
Abstract
Shanna N. McClain, Carl Bruch, and Mai Fujii
Paper: pp. 315-326
Alternatives for the Marshall Islands to Cope with the Anticipated Sea Level Rise by Climate Change
Abstract
Mikiyasu Nakayama, Ryo Fujikura, Rie Okuda, Mai Fujii, Ryuta Takashima, Tomoya Murakawa, Erika Sakai, and Hiroaki Iwama
Paper: pp. 327-334
Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change Induced Sea Level Rise by Infrastructure Development: Case of the Maldives
Abstract
Akiko Sakamoto, Koichi Nishiya, Xuanjin Guo, Airi Sugimoto, Waka Nagasaki, and Kaito Doi
Paper: pp. 335-345
The Ongoingness of Migration: Marshallese Well-Being in the United States
Abstract
Brittany L. Wheeler, Juno Fitzpatrick, and Kees van der Geest
Paper: pp. 346-355
Pivotal Factors in the Acculturation of the Second-Generation Marshallese Immigrants to the United States
Abstract
Mikiyasu Nakayama, Junko Toyoshima, and Nagisa Shiiba
Paper: pp. 356-364
Evacuees Preferred to Continue Living in Relocation Sites Rather than Return: Misunderstanding of the Government and Media About the True Intentions of Evacuees
Abstract
Ryo Fujikura, Miko Maekawa, Mikiyasu Nakayama, and Daisuke Sasaki
Paper: pp. 365-371
COVID-19 and Discrimination Experiences in the Marshallese Communities of Springdale, Arkansas
Abstract
Rachel N. Stern and Melisa Laelan
Paper: pp. 372-379
Migration in the Midst of a Pandemic: A Case Study of Pacific Islanders in Oregon
Abstract
Scott Drinkall, Jackie Leung, and Kapiolani Micky
Paper: pp. 380-387
Highly Skilled Migrant Workers as a Vulnerability of Small Island Developing States During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Cases of Three Countries in Micronesia
Abstract
Miko Maekawa, Mikiyasu Nakayama, Ryo Fujikura, Takayasu Yoshida, and Nagisa Shiiba

Mini Special Issue on Studies of Historical and Archaeological Materials for Disaster Research

Editorial: p. 389
Studies of Historical and Archaeological Materials for Disaster Research
Masaharu Ebara and Kenji Satake

Japan is a country that experiences a considerable number of natural disasters. It sees frequent seismic and volcanic activity because it is located on the boundaries of multiple plates. In addition, the temperate monsoon climate brings heavy rains and therefore floods and landslides. Since ancient times, the Japanese have repeatedly recovered from various natural disasters. That history has much to teach those living alive now.

In Japan, observation systems for earthquakes and volcanic eruptions have been set up, and research based on the records of these instruments is actively being done. However, some earthquakes and eruptions repeat at intervals of hundreds of years, making the investigation of historical and archaeological materials essential if the true circumstances of such natural events and damage they caused are to be learned. A part of the historical disaster research currently being conducted in Japan is presented in this mini special issue.

This mini special issue contains four papers. Ebara’s paper, taking up the ways in which artificial development has transformed the topography in the last 500 years, considers the relationship between the original topography and the damage caused by typhoons. Kaneko’s contribution considers the damage sustained by one village that was hit by the tsunami that resulted from the great earthquake in the early 18th century. Kaneko surveys archaeological sites and tombstones that reveal that many of the victims were women and children. Sugimori et al. elucidate the exact time of the great earthquake in the 19th century by using historical materials written in Japanese, English, and Russian. Along with the importance of comparing and contrasting various literatures, the work teaches us that disasters have no borders. Murata proposes a method of utilizing archaeological excavations in earthquake research. It also presents a case in which the condition of the ground, which cannot be understood by surface observation alone, is estimated from traces of a disaster.

From these papers, readers can learn the potential of historical and archaeological m...<more>

Paper: pp. 390-398
Development of Farmland in a Lagoon and Damage Caused by Storm Surge in 17th Century Japan
Abstract
Masaharu Ebara
Paper: pp. 399-408
Verification of Damage Caused by the Genroku Earthquake and Tsunami from Tomb Stones
Abstract
Hiroyuki Kaneko
Paper: pp. 409-419
Origin Time of the 1854 Tokai Earthquake Recorded in the Logbook of the Russian Frigate Diana
Abstract
Reiko Sugimori, Kazuko Ariizumi, and Kenji Satake
Paper: pp. 420-429
The Construction of the Historical Disaster Evidence Database and its Effectiveness
Abstract
Taisuke Murata

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 431-443
The Application of AHP to Determine the Priority Drainage System on Flood Mitigation in Surabaya – Indonesia
Abstract
Yang Ratri Savitri, Ryuji Kakimoto, Rawshan Ara Begum, Nadjadji Anwar, Wasis Wardoyo, and Erma Suryani
Paper: pp. 444-452
The Role of Local Disaster Relief Agencies in Influencing Local Government to Make New Spatial Management Local Regulations in Pandeglang Regency
Abstract
Anwar Kurniadi, Siswo Hadi Sumantri, and Fauzi Bahar
Survey Report: pp. 453-463
A CHANS Approach to Investigating Post-Disaster Recovery Potential in Rural Japan
Abstract
Jessica Ann Diehl, Kazuo Asahiro, Yun Hye Hwang, Taiga Hirashima, Lingchang Kong, Zhe Wang, Haomu Yao, and Puay Yok Tan
Paper: pp. 464-474
Development of Fragility Curves for Japanese Buildings Based on Integrated Damage Data from the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Kazuaki Torisawa, Masashi Matsuoka, Kei Horie, Munenari Inoguchi, and Fumio Yamazaki
Paper: pp. 475-486
The Effect of Incorporation of Embankment Information for Flood Simulation of the Gin River, Sri Lanka
Abstract
J. M. M. U. Jayapadma, Kazuyoshi Souma, Hiroshi Ishidaira, Jun Magome, and T. N. Wickramaarachchi
Paper: pp. 487-496
Calculating the Coverage Rate of a Transportation-Based Flood Warning Dissemination System in Brisbane
Abstract
Akihiko Nishino, Akira Kodaka, Madoka Nakajima, and Naohiko Kohtake

No.2

(Feb)

Mini Special Issue on the Role of Quantitative Questionnaire Surveys on the “Build Back Better” Component of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015–2030): The Life Recovery Survey Five Years After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Mini Special Issue on Disasters and Human Survivability: Preliminary Analysis

Mini Special Issue on the Role of Quantitative Questionnaire Surveys on the “Build Back Better” Component of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015–2030): The Life Recovery Survey Five Years After the Great East Japan Earthquake

Editorial: p. 163
the Role of Quantitative Questionnaire Surveys on the “Build Back Better” Component of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015–2030): The Life Recovery Survey Five Years After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Haruo Hayashi, Keiko Tamura, and Reo Kimura

This special issue focuses on “Build Back Better,” which is the key concept of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015–2030). The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction provides United Nations member states and economies concrete actions to protect their economic development achievements from disaster risk. However, how “Build Back Better” can be measured and linked to disaster risk reduction remain unclear.

Three papers here analyze the results of the “Life Recovery Survey Five Years After the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake,” which was conducted in June of 2016. The first Life Recovery Survey was conducted four years after the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake to document the extent to which the disaster victims had been able to rebuild their lives. Subsequently, the survey was conducted every two years until ten years after the earthquake. The survey was also conducted in the areas affected by the 2004 Niigata Chuetsu Earthquake and the 2007 Niigata Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake. Five years after the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, the present authors conducted a survey to document the actual situation of the disaster victims in Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures, which were the hardest hit by the disaster.

In addition, we analyzed the history of Nankai Trough earthquakes with the goal of preparing for the next Nankai Trough earthquake, which is predicted to occur in the near future. These results make it possible to identify issues and make recommendations on the kinds of systems that should be implemented.

It is our hope that this special issue will provide basic data to elucidate these issues.

Paper: pp. 164-182
Policies of Disaster Management in Japan for Preparation for Nankai Megathrust Earthquake
Abstract
Yoshiaki Kawata
Paper: pp. 183-196
Support That Disaster Victims of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Felt and Considerations on How to Formulate Measures for Disaster Management in the Future – Based on a Comparison with the 1995 Great Hanshin Awaji (Kobe) Earthquake, the 2004 Mid-Niigata Earthquake and the 2007 Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake
Abstract
Reo Kimura
Paper: pp. 197-206
Effect of the Seven Critical Elements on Life Recovery Following the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster
Abstract
Fuminori Kawami, Haruo Hayashi, Reo Kimura, Keiko Tamura, Munenari Inoguchi, and Shigeo Tatsuki
Paper: pp. 207-216
Pre-Existing Inequalities, Post-Event Social Environmental Changes, and Long-Term Trajectories of Life Recovery: Findings from Five-Wave Natori City Life Recovery Panel Survey
Abstract
Shinya Fujimoto, Fuminori Kawami, Anna Matsukawa, Shosuke Sato, and Shigeo Tatsuki

Mini Special Issue on Disasters and Human Survivability: Preliminary Analysis

Editorial: p. 217
Disasters and Human Survivability: Preliminary Analysis
Yosuke Alexandre Yamashiki

The main goal of the conceptual framework of this mini special issue, which is based on the International Symposium on Human Survivability 2016 (ISHS2016), is to provide a fresh look at the global challenges facing humanity in the areas of energy, water, food, population, disease, etc. The ISHS2016 focused on enhancing resilience to extreme or large-scale disasters that may threaten the well-being of present and future generations. By considering past, present, and future dimensions, we aimed to develop a holistic approach that integrated various research fields.

The symposium brought together scholars from not only the natural and social sciences but also the humanities. The idea behind this was that we need to go beyond the “silo-based” approach, where handling disasters is something left to experts with specialized knowledge. The integration of the knowledge of scholars from different academic fields and backgrounds could provide novel solutions to the problem of how to enhance our resilience to future disasters.

This mini special issue aims to identify key issues in prioritizing several different types of disasters in terms of their time frames and impact frames, with the knowledge that the disasters are of completely different types and that the capacity of each institution and the consciousness of society in terms of each issue are all unequal. From those, we may identify the main characteristics of “low probability and high impact disasters,” as well as the different approaches that are needed. Disasters vary from infectious diseases to space weather, tsunamis, and earthquakes.

Paper: pp. 218-229
When is a CAT Index Futures Traded and Preferred to Reinsurance? – Tradeoff Between Basis Risk and Adverse Selection –
Abstract
Kazuhiko Ohashi
Note: pp. 230-236
Extreme Solar Flare as a Catastrophic Risk
Abstract
Hiroaki Isobe, Takuya Takahashi, Daikichi Seki, and Yosuke Yamashiki
Note: pp. 237-245
Numerical Simulation Study of Debris Particles Movement Characteristics by Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics
Abstract
Shoji Ueta, Natsuki Hosono, Ryusuke Kuroki, and Yosuke Yamashiki
Note: pp. 246-256
Prioritization of Different Kinds of Natural Disasters and Low-Probability, High-Consequence Events
Abstract
Moe Fujita and Yosuke Yamashiki

Regular Papers

Note: pp. 257-262
Volcanic Ash from the June 17, 1962 Eruption of Yakedake Volcano: Stereomicroscopic, XRD, and Water-Soluble Components Analyses
Abstract
Muga Yaguchi, Takeshi Ohba, Yasuo Hirayama, and Nozomi Numanami
Survey Report: pp. 263-269
A Numerical Study on Bank Erosion of a Braided Channel: Case Study of the “Tangail and Manikganj Districts Along the Brahmaputra River”
Abstract
Islam Md Masbahul, Atsuhiro Yorozuya, Daisuke Harada, and Shinji Egashira

No.1

(Jan)

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics Part 2

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics Part 2

Editorial: pp. 5-6
COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics Part 2
Sumio Shinoda, Hideaki Karaki, and Haruo Hayashi

COVID-19, which originated in Wuhan, China, 2 years ago, became a pandemic, that continues to this day.

The Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) edited a special issue, “Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics” at the end of 2020 and an electronic version of the issue was published in January 2021 (JDR Vol.16, No.1, pp. 1-117).

Even though one year has passed, life has not yet returned to normal due to the continued spread of COVID-19. Although the percentage of the general public that has been vaccinated continues to increase and various drugs and treatments have been developed, the number of COVID-19 cases also continues to increase. A huge number of COVID-19 cases have been reported, especially in Europe and the Americas.

Accordingly, we planned to publish Special Issue Part 2 and called for papers.

This Special Issue Part 2 includes 18 manuscripts, which deal with general epidemiology, effects on socioeconomic or educational areas, and clinical medicine, including vaccines and medical treatments.

The virus spike protein plays an important role in its intrusion into human cells and the onset of COVID-19 infection. Although SARS-CoV-2 (the pathogenic virus of COVID-19) originated in Wuhan, China, various variant strains with mutation in gene coding in the spike protein have appeared in multiple countries. The WHO classifies these variants into the categories of VOC (variant of concern), VOI (variant of interest), or VUM (variant under monitoring).

The definitions of VOC and VOI are as follows. VOC: “A SARS-CoV-2 variant that meets the definition of a VOI and, through a comparative assessment, has been demonstrated to be associated with one or more changes in the degree of global public health significance.” VOI: “Increase in transmissibility or detrimental change in COVID-19 epidemiology, increase in virulence or change in clinical disease presentation, or decrease in effectiveness of public health and social measures or available diagnostics, vaccines and therapeutics.”

The WHO uses Greek letters designating the variants. Ac...<more>

Review: pp. 7-20
Effectiveness of and Immune Responses to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccines and Their Mechanisms
Abstract
Eiichi Gohda
Note: pp. 21-30
Questionnaire Survey on COVID-19 Vaccination at Okayama University in Japan: Factors Promoting Vaccination Among Young Adults
Abstract
Chigusa Higuchi, Naomi Matsumoto, Yoshiaki Iwasaki, Takashi Yorifuji, Junichiro Yamazaki, Yasutomo Nasu, and Hirofumi Makino
Paper: pp. 31-42
Portrait of Indonesian Family During One Year the COVID-19 Pandemic: Analysis of Factors Influencing Family Welfare and Resilience
Abstract
Euis Sunarti, Aliya Faizah Fithriyah, Nikmatul Khoiriyah, Winny Novyanti, Intan Islamia, and Viena R Hasanah
Note: pp. 43-50
Life Alterations and Stress During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Japan: Two-Time Comparison
Abstract
Junko Okuyama, Shuji Seto, Yu Fukuda, Kiyoshi Ito, Fumihiko Imamura, Shunichi Funakoshi, and Shin-Ichi Izumi
Paper: pp. 51-56
Excess Mortality by Suicide Caused by COVID-19 in Japan
Abstract
Junko Kurita, Tamie Sugawara, and Yasushi Ohkusa
Paper: pp. 57-60
Huge Excess Mortality Due to the Delta Strain of COVID-19 in Japan in August 2021
Abstract
Junko Kurita, Tamie Sugawara, and Yasushi Ohkusa
Note: pp. 61-64
Population Density and Regional Differences Determine the Probability of COVID-19 Infection
Abstract
Hideaki Karaki
Review: pp. 65-72
COVID-19 and Spanish Flu, the Representative Pandemics of the 21st and 20th Centuries
Abstract
Sumio Shinoda
Review: pp. 73-81
The Importance of Monitoring Viral Respiratory Infections During the COVID-19 Crisis
Abstract
Itsuki Hamamoto and Noriko Shimasaki
Review: pp. 82-86
Countermeasures Against COVID-19 from the Viewpoints of Dental Diseases: Strengthening Innate Immunity with the Toothpick Method of Brushing
Abstract
Tatsuo Watanabe
Paper: pp. 87-92
COVID-19 Response and Preparedness in the Okayama Prefecture
Abstract
Miho Sodeno and Toshiaki Noriyasu
Paper: pp. 93-102
Agent-Based Simulation and Modeling of COVID-19 Pandemic: A Bibliometric Analysis
Abstract
Jing Tang, Sukrit Vinayavekhin, Manapat Weeramongkolkul, Chanakan Suksanon, Kantapat Pattarapremcharoen, Sasinat Thiwathittayanuphap, and Natt Leelawat
Note: pp. 103-112
Impact of COVID-19 on the Employment of and Employment Support for People with Disabilities
Abstract
Kaede Morimoto, Junko Hoshii, Chito Masuda, Kana Endo, Akiko Sahira, Kayano Yotsumoto, and Takeshi Hashimoto
Paper: pp. 113-122
Developing an Assessment Framework of the Recovery Calendar for COVID-19 Calamity: Based on the Data from the June 2021 Survey
Abstract
Shoji Ohtomo and Reo Kimura
Paper: pp. 123-135
Interventions to Support Tourism and its Impact on Air Quality - A Case Study of the Go To Travel Campaign in Japan –
Abstract
Akira Kodaka, Bernadette Joy Detera, Yasushi Onda, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, Ampan Laosunthara, Kumpol Saengtabtim, and Naohiko Kohtake
Note: pp. 136-143
Associations Between Psychological Conditions and Social Capital Among Chinese International Students in Japan During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Abstract
Yuanyuan Teng and Keisuke Takemoto
Note: pp. 144-151
Building Disaster Resilience amid the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Transdisciplinary Approach for Decision Making
Abstract
Masashi Inoue, Masaru Arakida, Youb Raj Paudyal, Khamarrul Azahari Razak, Ting-Chi Tsao, Chandan Ghosh, Warren Ladbrook, Kuniyoshi Takeuchi, and Mikio Ishiwatari
Review: pp. 152-158
Diversification of Business Risks Due to Social Changes with COVID-19
Abstract
Eri Ino and Kenji Watanabe

Vol.16 (2021)

No.8

(Dec)

The Seventh JDR Award

The Seventh JDR Award

Award: p. 1155
Congratulations! The Seventh JDR Award
Editor-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
Award: p. 1156
Presenting the Seventh JDR Award
Haruo Hayashi
Award: pp. 1157-1159
Towards the Next Stage of the Journal of Disaster Research
Journal of Disaster Research Editorial Board

Regular Papers

Survey Report: pp. 1161-1178
The Reality of Disaster Mitigation Activities for Companies in Tokyo’s Central Business District: A Case Study on Support for Stranded Commuters in the Initial Period in Chuo-Ku
Abstract
U Hiroi, Jun Shindo, Tsuyoshi Kurome, Takeshi Toratani, and Sakurako Miyata
Paper: pp. 1179-1196
Rural Housing Reconstruction and Sustainable Development Post Wenchuan Earthquake: A Land Unification Perspective Using Dujiangyan City as an Example
Abstract
Wumair Kabilijiang, Zhen Lan, Osamu Koide, Yuyu Geng, and Takaaki Kato
Paper: pp. 1197-1206
Hydrological Modeling of the Astore River Basin, Pakistan, by Integrating Snow and Glacier Melt Processes and Climate Scenarios
Abstract
Sohaib Baig, Takahiro Sayama, and Kaoru Takara
Paper: pp. 1207-1233
Public Reaction to Disaster Reconstruction Policy: Case Studies of the Fukushima and Chernobyl Nuclear Accidents
Abstract
Tetsuya Nakamura, Steven Lloyd, Atsushi Maruyama, and Satoru Masuda
Survey Report: pp. 1234-1242
What Helps Early Recovery of Disaster-Affected Small Businesses: A Case Study of a Local Cooperative Affected by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Jin Li and Fei Zhou
Paper: pp. 1243-1256
Developing a Model for Disaster Education to Improve Students’ Disaster Mitigation Literacy
Abstract
Juhadi, Nur Hamid, Edy Trihatmoko, Meri Herlina, and Elvara Norma Aroyandini
Survey Report: pp. 1257-1264
Benefits of Defining Geological Sensitive Zones in the Mitigation of Disasters Along Earthquake Fault Zones in Taiwan – The Case of Milun Fault
Abstract
Tyan-Ming Chu, Wen-Jeng Huang, Tsung-Yi Lin, Shih-Ting Lu, Yen-Chiu Liu, Cheng-Shing Chiang, and Yi-Huei Chang
Paper: pp. 1265-1273
Assessing the Intermediate Function of Local Academic Institutions During the Rehabilitation and Reconstruction of Aceh, Indonesia
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki, Hizir Sofyan, Novi Reandy Sasmita, Muzailin Affan, and Nizamuddin Nizamuddin
Paper: pp. 1274-1285
Radioactive Contamination Countermeasures, Food Inspection Systems, and the Issue of Reputational Damage in the Early Stages of the Nuclear Disaster in Fukushima Prefecture
Abstract
Ryota Koyama and William D. Y. McMichael
Paper: pp. 1286-1297
Applicability of the Numerical Simulation of the Impulsive Wave Pressure of Solitary Waves
Abstract
Taro Arikawa, Kenya Takahashi, Kojiro Suzuki, Naoto Kihara, Daishi Okamoto, and Jun Mitsui

No.7

(Oct)

Mini Special Issue on Tsunami Numerical Modeling Benchmarks – Challenges of Tsunami Modeling Hackathon –
Mini Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2021

Mini Special Issue on Tsunami Numerical Modeling Benchmarks – Challenges of Tsunami Modeling Hackathon –

Editorial: p. 977
Tsunami Numerical Modeling Benchmarks – Challenges of Tsunami Modeling Hackathon –
Shunichi Koshimura

Numerical simulation and modeling became an essential technology in tsunami research and disaster management. Various numerical models were proposed and utilized for the development of tsunami risk assessment, inundation maps, and evacuation plans. The model verification and validation standards would be crucial to ensure sufficient reliability of tsunami risk assessment, inundation maps, as well as a consistency among various efforts. Common approach to ensure sufficient accuracy and reliability of numerical modeling is developing benchmark problems of hydraulic experiments and to use them for numerical model’s verification and validation.

To satisfy this requirement, “Tsunami Modeling Hackathon” was held in September 2020 to organize new benchmark problems in numerical modeling of tsunamis and to improve their reliability and accuracy. Hackathon is an intensive-gathering event of computer programmers and others involved in software development to create outcomes by the end of the event. This event was organized by Prof. Tomoyuki Takahashi of Kansai University and his colleagues, who led the tsunami research subcommittee in Japan Society of Civil Engineers (JSCE).

Tsunami modeling hackathon, in which about 23 teams and 162 researchers joined, included experiment and modeling teams in seven benchmark problems: urban tsunami inundation, landslide tsunami, tsunami loading on seawalls and coastal structures, sediment transport, drift of floating objects. The modeling groups performed the blind tests to cross-validate and interpret the results of their simulations in seven benchmark problems given by the experiment groups and discussed the improvement.

This special issue reports the outcomes of the tsunami modeling hackathon, and includes six papers (five in this issue, one in the regular issue). We hope this issue will provide useful insights for tsunami modelers and contribute to establishing a standardized way to ensure that various tsunami numerical models would be validated through the benchmark problems.

Survey Report: pp. 978-993
Numerical Simulation of Urban Inundation Processes and Their Hydraulic Quantities – Tsunami Analysis Hackathon Theme 1 –
Abstract
Tomohiro Yasuda, Kentaro Imai, Yoshinori Shigihara, Taro Arikawa, Toshitaka Baba, Naotaka Chikasada, Yuuki Eguchi, Masato Kamiya, Masaaki Minami, Toshiharu Miyauchi, Kazuya Nojima, Kwanchai Pakoksung, Anawat Suppasri, and Yuho Tominaga
Paper: pp. 994-1004
Numerical Simulations Using Various Models for Tsunamis Due to a Fluid or Rigid Bodies Falling Down a Uniform Slope
Abstract
Taro Kakinuma, Mitsuru Yanagihara, Tsunakiyo Iribe, Kuninori Nagai, Chisato Hara, Natsuki Hamada, Tatsuya Nakagaki, Karina Aprilia Sujatmiko, Ikha Magdalena, Kaori Nagai, Rika Kannonji, Songgui Chen, Tomoki Shirai, and Taro Arikawa
Paper: pp. 1005-1014
Blind-Test Numerical Simulation of Tsunami Wave Pressure Acting on a Land Structure
Abstract
Jun Mitsui, Koji Kawasaki, Hiroki Kubota, and Kojiro Suzuki
Paper: pp. 1015-1029
Comparisons of Numerical Models on Formation of Sediment Deposition Induced by Tsunami Run-Up
Abstract
Ako Yamamoto, Yuki Kajikawa, Kei Yamashita, Ryota Masaya, Ryo Watanabe, and Kenji Harada
Paper: pp. 1030-1044
Inter-Model Comparison for Tsunami Debris Simulation
Abstract
Tomoyuki Takabatake, Jacob Stolle, Koji Hiraishi, Naoto Kihara, Kazuya Nojima, Yoshinori Shigihara, Taro Arikawa, and Ioan Nistor

Mini Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2021

Editorial: p. 1045
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2021
Haruo Hayashi and Hiroyuki Fujiwara

We are very pleased to publish this Mini Special Issue, dedicated to NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2021. Three papers and one survey report are included.

Miura et al. indicate the scope of disaster prevention covered by the new courses of study in the field of disaster prevention. By visualizing the contents of classification and analysis, they propose how to handle the scope of disaster prevention in disaster prevention learning in consideration of the comprehensiveness to solve the problems. In the second paper, a case study on flood damage in Hitoyoshi, Kumamoto Prefecture, Mizui and Fujiwara analyze a method of immediately determining the amount of waste disposal work and the number of residents and disaster volunteers required in the event of a disaster. Fujiwara et al. study the feasibility of estimating damage to large-spanned building structures by conducting shake table tests on a small gymnasium model with simulated damage and measuring the natural frequencies and mode shapes. Onoue et al., in a work published as a survey report, present a method for analyzing slope displacement by using the distance image data of a depth camera. They indicate the possibility of detecting minute changes that can precede slope failure.

We hope this issue provides information useful to all readers who study natural disasters.

Paper: pp. 1046-1060
Proposal of Disaster Prevention Learning in Consideration of Comprehensiveness Based on Analysis of the New Courses of Study in Disaster
Abstract
Shinya Miura, Haruo Hayashi, Etsuko Koda, Tomohiro Naganuma, Naohiro Fujikawa, Manabu Sasaki, Naomi Kobori, and Nakako Oyanagi
Paper: pp. 1061-1073
Estimate the Amount of Disaster Waste Disposal Work Using In-Vehicle Camera Images – A Case Study in Hitoyoshi City, Kumamoto Prefecture –
Abstract
Yoshinobu Mizui and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
Paper: pp. 1074-1085
Changes in the Dynamic Characteristics of a Small-Scale Gymnasium Model Due to Simulated Earthquake Damage
Abstract
Jun Fujiwara, Akiko Kishida, Takashi Aoki, Ryuta Enokida, and Koichi Kajiwara
Survey Report: pp. 1086-1095
Proposing a Method to Analyze Slope Displacement Using the Distance Image Data of Depth Camera
Abstract
Yasuhiro Onoue, Tomohiro Ishizawa, Toru Danjo, and Teruki Fukuzono

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 1097-1106
Knowledge Creation for Community Resilience (KCCR): A Conceptual Model
Abstract
Rina Suryani Oktari, Khairul Munadi, Rinaldi Idroes, and Hizir Sofyan
Paper: pp. 1107-1120
Two Major Elements of Life Recovery After a Disaster: Their Impacts Dependent on Housing Damage and the Contributions of Psycho-Behavioral Factors
Abstract
Shosuke Sato, Ryo Ishibashi, and Motoaki Sugiura
Paper: pp. 1121-1136
Development of Disaster Management Education Program to Enhance Disaster Response Capabilities of Schoolchildren During Heavy Rainfall – Implementation at Elementary School in Nagaoka City, Niigata Prefecture, a Disaster-Stricken Area
Abstract
Masaki Ikeda, Toshimitsu Nagata, Reo Kimura, Tai-Young Yi, Shingo Suzuki, Shingo Nagamatsu, Takashi Oda, Shun Endo, Mitsuhiro Hatakeyama, Seigo Yoshikawa, Satoru Adachi, Shinya Miura, and Junya Take
Survey Report: pp. 1137-1146
Comparison of the Initial Overseas Evacuation Operations Due to COVID-19: A Focus on Asian Countries
Abstract
Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, Kodchakorn Krutphong, Suwajo Chaichanasiri, Taro Kanno, Chen-Wei Li, Lien Thi Quynh Le, Ho Quic Dung, Kumpol Saengtabtim, and Ampan Laosunthara

No.6

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part VI – Thoughts About the Great Disaster Now That Ten Years Have Passed –

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part VI – Thoughts About the Great Disaster Now That Ten Years Have Passed –

Editorial: p. 907
the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part VI – Thoughts About the Great Disaster Now That Ten Years Have Passed –
Katsuki Takiguchi and Haruo Hayashi

A holistic and comprehensive perspective on society is essential to disaster research. However, at one time, the world did not have any scholarly journals that dealt with disasters from a holistic point of view. This situation gave rise to the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), the first issue of which was published in August 2006. In principle, six issues are published annually, with special or extra issues also published in some years.

The Great East Japan Earthquake struck in March 2011, five years after the first issue of the JDR. Following this incident, we decided to publish a special issue whenever there was a major disaster. All accepted papers and articles were to be published free of charge, in electronic format. So far, eight special issues have been published.

Since this year 2021 marks the tenth anniversary of that disaster, we at the JDR have decided to publish a special issue of notes on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster. The selected theme is “Thoughts About the Great Disaster Now That Ten Years Have Passed.” As an academic journal dealing comprehensively with disasters and disaster risk reduction, we asked people working in all disaster-related fields to submit, from their unique perspectives, their views or proposals in any area or subject regarding what changes have taken place, what has remained the same, or what is needed in the future.

We have the twelve notes presented here in this Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part VI. We hope that these notes provide seeds for further progress in the field of disaster research.

Lastly, the editors would like to thank all contributors who submitted their manuscripts and the reviewers who provided valuable feedback with their constructive comments.

Note: pp. 908-913
The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami: A Message from Japan to Thailand
Abstract
Natt Leelawat, Ampan Laosunthara, Jing Tang, Anawat Suppasri, Anat Ruangrassamee, Prasert Akkharaprathompong, and Fumihiko Imamura
Note: pp. 914-921
Importance of Psychological Support for Disaster-Affected Adolescents: 10 Years After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Junko Okuyama, Shunichi Funakoshi, Shuji Seto, Yu Fukuda, Kiyoshi Ito, Fumihiko Imamura, and Shin-Ichi Izumi
Note: pp. 922-928
Issues in Tsunami Countermeasures from the Viewpoint of Geotechnical Engineering
Abstract
Hiroshi Nakazawa, Tadashi Hara, and Koichi Kajiwara
Note: pp. 929-932
Problems of Local Disaster Management Plan at the Great East Japan Earthquake and Achievements 10 Years Later
Abstract
Hajime Kagiya
Note: pp. 933-935
Structure of Rumor Disaster – On Fukushima Daiichi N.P.P. Unit 4 –
Abstract
Katsuki Takiguchi
Note: pp. 936-941
A Fundamental Vulnerability: Contributions from Population Studies
Abstract
Tadashi Nakasu
Note: pp. 942-946
Learning from Megadisasters in Japan: Sharing Lessons with the World
Abstract
Mikio Ishiwatari, Federica Ranghieri, Kazushige Taniguchi, and Satoru Mimura
Note: pp. 947-952
Why Businesses Give: A Case of Foundation’s Long-Term Disaster Relief
Abstract
Yu Ishida, Aya Okada, Daiki Ono, Takayoshi Naganuma, and Toshiyuki Takenaka
Note: pp. 953-956
Disaster Relief Funding by Private Grants and POs: Actors Supporting “Paradise” After Disaster
Abstract
Takako Nakajima
Note: pp. 957-961
The Effect of Disaster Volunteer Experience on the Well-Being of Young People in the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Yusuke Saito and Yu Ishida
Note: pp. 962-966
Emerging Policy Entrepreneurs and Their Potential After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Shunsuke Mitsui and Yu Ishida
Note: pp. 967-971
Achievements and Challenges of Governmental Human Resource Support System in Japanese Disaster Response for Affected Local Governments in the Aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Shohei Beniya

No.5

(Aug)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 817-826
Language as a Tool for Disaster Mitigation Management: Analysis of Warning System Text in Language and Institutional Framework
Abstract
Muhammad Zaim, Rusnardi Rahmat Putra, and Nur Rosita
Paper: pp. 827-839
Method to Generate Building Damage Maps by Combining Aerial Image Processing and Crowdsourcing
Abstract
Hidehiko Shishido, Koyo Kobayashi, Yoshinari Kameda, and Itaru Kitahara
Paper: pp. 840-865
Impact on Fisheries in Contaminated Water Discharged from Nuclear Power and Reprocessing Plants: The Cases of La Hague Reprocessing Plant, Sellafield Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant, and TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
Abstract
Tetsuya Nakamura, Steven Lloyd, Atsushi Maruyama, and Satoru Masuda
Paper: pp. 866-873
Analysis of Evacuation Time for Vulnerable Individuals During Inundation of Lowland Areas
Abstract
Chang Yeon Bae and Kenichiro Kobayashi
Paper: pp. 874-881
Description of the Use of the Incident Command System Among Public Health Agencies Responding to COVID-19
Abstract
Sarah Elizabeth Scales, Roxanna Fouladi, and Jennifer A. Horney
Note: pp. 882-889
Sociocultural Factors in Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) Teams of Central America and the Caribbean
Abstract
Amaly Fong Lee and Adan Vega Saenz
Paper: pp. 890-894
Excess Mortality Probably Attributable to COVID-19 in Tokyo, Japan During August and October 2020
Abstract
Junko Kurita, Tamie Sugawara, and Yasushi Ohkusa

No.4

(Jun)

Special Issue on e-ASIA JRP: Development of a Landslide Monitoring and Prediction System in Monsoon Asia
Special Issue on the Tokyo Metropolitan Resilience Project

Special Issue on e-ASIA JRP: Development of a Landslide Monitoring and Prediction System in Monsoon Asia

Editorial: pp. 483-484
e-ASIA JRP: Development of a Landslide Monitoring and Prediction System in Monsoon Asia
Akihiko Wakai, Go Sato, The Viet Tran, Jessada Karnjana, and Jiro Komori

This special issue summarizes some of the findings of the first half of our international joint research between Japan, Thailand, and Vietnam. This collaborative research is based on the framework of the e-ASIA Joint Research Program (e-ASIA JRP) and lasts for three years. Rainfall-induced landslides are a common disaster in many Asian countries. Our goal is to develop a practical method for landslide susceptibility mapping so that there are fewer landslide disasters in the future.

The e-ASIA JRP is an international joint initiative of public funding organizations in the East Asia Summit member countries. Based on the co-funding mechanism, support for the research teams is received from the funding organizations in their respective countries. Since 2019, the Japanese, Thai, and Vietnamese teams have been supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), the National Science and Technology Development Agency of Thailand (NSTDA), and the Ministry of Science and Technology of Vietnam (MOST), respectively.

In the first half of our project, we completed the basic steps for developing the system. In this special issue, we are proud to present some of our achievements, including studies on slope failure analysis, landslide prevention works, meteorological observations, landslide monitoring, statistical or wide-area risk evaluations, mathematical models, and flash flood control. In addition to the above, we also present other valuable research achievements that related members have provided to help ensure the achievement of our goals. In total, 20 papers are published here. We believe that our comprehensive research activities will dramatically increase future landslide disaster mitigation, especially in monsoon Asia, and will strongly augment the roadmap for achieving the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a common desire of humanity.

Paper: pp. 485-494
Stability Analysis of Slopes with Terraced Topography in Sapa, Northern Vietnam: Semi-Infinite Slope Assumption with Specific Lengths for Slope Failure
Abstract
Akihiko Wakai, Akino Watanabe, Nguyen Van Thang, Takashi Kimura, Go Sato, Kazunori Hayashi, Nanaha Kitamura, Takatsugu Ozaki, Hoang Viet Hung, Nguyen Duc Manh, and Tran The Viet
Paper: pp. 495-500
The Helical Anchor Type with Application as a Horizontal Drainage Equipment for Slope Protection
Abstract
Nguyen Mai Chi, Hoang Viet Hung, Akihiko Wakai, Go Sato, and Nguyen Ha Phuong
Paper: pp. 501-511
Identification, Monitoring, and Assessment of an Active Landslide in Tavan-Hauthao, Sapa, Laocai, Vietnam – A Multidisciplinary Approach
Abstract
Manh Duc Nguyen, Nguyen Van Thang, Akihiko Wakai, Go Sato, Jessada Karnjana, Hoang Viet Hung, Lanh Si Ho, Indra Prakash, Hoc Tran Quang, and Binh Thai Pham
Paper: pp. 512-520
A Non-Linear, Time-Variant Approach to Simulate the Rainfall-Induced Slope Failure of an Unsaturated Soil Slope: A Case Study in Sapa, Vietnam
Abstract
The Viet Tran, Hoang Viet Hung, Huy Dung Pham, Go Sato, and Hoang Hiep Vu
Paper: pp. 521-528
Landslide Susceptibility Mapping Based on the Combination of Bivariate Statistics and Modified Analytic Hierarchy Process Methods: A Case Study of Tinh Tuc Town, Nguyen Binh District, Cao Bang Province, Vietnam
Abstract
Nguyen Trung Kien, The Viet Tran, Vy Thi Hong Lien, Pham Le Hoang Linh, and Nguyen Quoc Thanh
Paper: pp. 529-538
Developing a Landslide Susceptibility Map Using the Analytic Hierarchical Process in Ta Van and Hau Thao Communes, Sapa, Vietnam
Abstract
Thi Thanh Thuy Le, The Viet Tran, Viet Hung Hoang, Van Truong Bui, Thi Kien Trinh Bui, and Ha Phuong Nguyen
Paper: pp. 539-546
Factors Affecting Slope Instability of the Nhan Co Alumina Red Mud Basin and Economical, Environmentally Friendly Soil Stabilization
Abstract
Nguyen Van Hoang, Hoang Viet Hung, Nguyen Mai Chi, Pham Huy Dung, and Dao Trong Tien
Survey Report: pp. 547-555
Landslide Investigation Results in Sapa Town, Lao Cai Province, Vietnam in December 2019
Abstract
Nguyen Van Thang, Go Sato, Akihiko Wakai, Hoang Viet Hung, Nguyen Duc Manh, Takashi Kimura, Takanari Yamasaki, Shinichi Tosa, Kazunori Hayashi, Akino Watanabe, Takatsugu Ozaki, Nobuyuki Asai, and Nanaha Kitamura
Survey Report: pp. 556-560
Landslide Process Revealed by Mineralogical Properties of Landslide Deposits in the Sa Pa District, Vietnam
Abstract
Takanari Yamasaki, Go Sato, Takashi Kimura, Hoang Viet Hung, Nguyen Duc Manh, Takatsugu Ozaki, Osamu Yokoyama, Shinichi Tosa, and Akihiko Wakai
Paper: pp. 561-570
Real-Time Slope Stability Analysis Utilizing High-Resolution Gridded Precipitation Datasets Based on Spatial Interpolation of Measurements at Scattered Weather Station
Abstract
Nanaha Kitamura, Akino Watanabe, Akihiko Wakai, Takatsugu Ozaki, Go Sato, Takashi Kimura, Jessada Karnjana, Kanokvate Tungpimolrut, Seksun Sartsatit, and Udom Lewlomphaisarl
Paper: pp. 571-578
Factoring Multi-Hazard Risk Perception in Risk Assessment and Reduction Measures in Landslide and Flash Flood Prone Areas – A Case Study of Sichon District, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, Thailand
Abstract
Indrajit Pal and Jessada Karnjana
Paper: pp. 579-587
A Novel Recursive Non-Parametric DBSCAN Algorithm for 3D Data Analysis with an Application in Rockfall Detection
Abstract
Pitisit Dillon, Pakinee Aimmanee, Akihiko Wakai, Go Sato, Hoang Viet Hung, and Jessada Karnjana
Paper: pp. 588-595
Study on Combining Two Faster R-CNN Models for Landslide Detection with a Classification Decision Tree to Improve the Detection Performance
Abstract
Asadang Tanatipuknon, Pakinee Aimmanee, Yoshihiro Watanabe, Ken T. Murata, Akihiko Wakai, Go Sato, Hoang Viet Hung, Kanokvate Tungpimolrut, Suthum Keerativittayanun, and Jessada Karnjana
Paper: pp. 596-606
Reservoir Flood Routing Simulation for Dam Safety Management in Thailand
Abstract
Rangsarit Vanijjirattikhan, Chinoros Thongthamchart, Patsorn Rakcheep, Unpong Supakchukul, and Jittiwut Suwatthikul
Survey Report: pp. 607-617
Development of Dam Safety Remote Monitoring and Evaluation System
Abstract
Jittiwut Suwatthikul, Rangsarit Vanijjirattikhan, Unpong Supakchukul, Kumpee Suksomboon, Rungtip Nuntawattanasirichai, Jirayut Phontip, Udom Lewlomphaisarl, Kanokvate Tangpimolrut, and Sirichete Samranyoodee
Paper: pp. 618-625
New Approach for the Extraction Method of Landslide-Prone Slopes Using Geomorphological Analysis: Feasibility Study in the Shikoku Mountains, Japan
Abstract
Go Sato, Takatsugu Ozaki, Osamu Yokoyama, Akihiko Wakai, Kazunori Hayashi, Takanari Yamasaki, Shinichi Tosa, Takayuki Mayumi, and Takashi Kimura
Paper: pp. 626-635
Simulation of Slope Failure Distributions Due to Heavy Rain on an Island Composed of Highly Weathered Granodiorite Based on the Simple Seepage Analysis
Abstract
Takatsugu Ozaki, Akihiko Wakai, Go Sato, Takashi Kimura, Takanari Yamasaki, Kazunori Hayashi, and Akino Watanabe
Paper: pp. 636-645
The Effect of Surface Layer Thickness in a Wide-Area Simulation in Different Models: Susceptibility Mapping of Rainfall-Induced Landslide
Abstract
Akino Watanabe, Akihiko Wakai, Takatsugu Ozaki, Thang Van Nguyen, Takashi Kimura, Go Sato, Kazunori Hayashi, and Nanaha Kitamura
Paper: pp. 646-657
Geometry and the Mechanism of Landslide Occurrence in a Limestone Area – Case Examples of Landslides in Vietnam and from Europe, China, and Japan –
Abstract
Bui Duc Tung, Ngoc Ha Do, Nguyen Kim Thanh, Le Hong Luong, Osamu Watanabe, Kazunori Hayashi, Akihiko Wakai, and Shinro Abe
Paper: pp. 658-673
Rigorous Analysis of Stress-Dependent Landslide Movements with Groundwater Fluctuations Applicable to Disaster Prevention in Monsoon Asia
Abstract
Deepak Raj Bhat, Soichiro Osawa, Akihiko Wakai, Katsuo Sasahara, Netra P. Bhandary, Fei Cai, Hirotaka Ochiai, and Norihiro Tanaka

Special Issue on the Tokyo Metropolitan Resilience Project

Editorial: p. 675
the Tokyo Metropolitan Resilience Project
Naoshi Hirata

Natural hazards continue to be an increasing challenge to societies around the world, with many societies being impacted by multiple types of hazard events. To reduce the impact of these hazards, we must not only quantify the hazard and risk associated with multi-hazard events but also understand the uncertainty associated with these events. Resilience can only be improved by considering all these factors. Multi-hazard and risk-modeling approaches are receiving increasing attention globally; however, the challenges of assessing uncertainty in both single- and multi-hazard risks are considerable. Without a clear understanding of the risks and their uncertainties, measures to mitigate these risks and to increase resilience face difficult decisions. In the present Special Issue, we have five papers and one report on the Tokyo Metropolitan Resilience Project: Interdisciplinary and Industry-Academia Collaboration Research for Enhancing Social Resilience to Natural Disasters in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area –DEKATSU Activity–, Multi-Data Integration System to Capture Detailed Strong Ground Motion in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area, Development of the Training Tool “KUG” for Temporary Lodging Facilities and Companies for Stranded Commuters, Development of Matching Modeling for Human Resource Allocation of Shelter Management by the Set Theory, Time-Cost Estimation for Early Disaster Damage Assessment Methods, Depending on Affected Area, and A Report of the Questionnaire Survey on Awareness of COVID-19 and Shelters.

Paper: pp. 676-683
Interdisciplinary and Industry-Academia Collaboration Research for Enhancing Social Resilience to Natural Disasters in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area –DEKATSU Activity–
Abstract
Takashi Furuya and Naoshi Hirata
Paper: pp. 684-699
Multi-Data Integration System to Capture Detailed Strong Ground Motion in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area
Abstract
Shin Aoi, Takeshi Kimura, Tomotake Ueno, Shigeki Senna, and Hiroki Azuma
Paper: pp. 700-718
Development of the Training Tool “KUG” for Temporary Lodging Facilities and Companies for Stranded Commuters
Abstract
U Hiroi, Sakurako Miyata, Jun Shindo, and Tsuyoshi Kurome
Paper: pp. 719-732
Development of Matching Modeling for Human Resource Allocation of Shelter Management by the Set Theory
Abstract
Muneyoshi Numada
Paper: pp. 733-746
Time-Cost Estimation for Early Disaster Damage Assessment Methods, Depending on Affected Area
Abstract
Munenari Inoguchi, Keiko Tamura, Kousuke Uo, Masaki Kobayashi, and Atsuyuki Morishima
Survey Report: pp. 747-764
A Report of the Questionnaire Survey on Awareness of COVID-19 and Shelters
Abstract
Arisa Yasui and Muneyoshi Numada

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 765-777
Designing an Indonesian Disaster Management Information System with Local Characteristics: A Case Study of Mount Merapi
Abstract
Amelia Santoso, Joniarto Parung, Dina Natalia Prayogo, and Ameilia Lolita
Note: pp. 778-785
3D Total Lightning Observation Network in Tokyo Metropolitan Area (Tokyo LMA)
Abstract
Namiko Sakurai, Koyuru Iwanami, Shingo Shimizu, Yasushi Uji, Shin-ichi Suzuki, Takeshi Maesaka, Ken-ichi Shimose, Paul R. Krehbiel, William Rison, and Daniel Rodeheffer
Paper: pp. 786-793
A Comparison Between Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation Data and High-Resolution Radar Data – A Case Study of Localized Torrential Rainfall over Japan
Abstract
Yoshiaki Hayashi, Taichi Tebakari, and Akihiro Hashimoto
Paper: pp. 794-812
Typology of Learning Contents in “Supplementary Textbook for Disaster Prevention Education” – What Are Teachers in the Areas Affected by the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in 1995, and the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, Striving to Teach Students in Junior High School? –
Abstract
Koji Sato, Reo Kimura, and Shoji Ohtomo

No.3

(Apr)

Special Issue on Actions Toward Futuristic Urban Flood Risk Research and Management

Special Issue on Actions Toward Futuristic Urban Flood Risk Research and Management

Editorial: p. 309
Actions Toward Futuristic Urban Flood Risk Research and Management
Yoshihiro Shibuo, Kenji Kawaike, and Hiroaki Furumai

As rainfalls exceeding the designed level have increased, so has damage associated with pluvial flooding. Typhoon Hagibis, which swept Japan in 2019, left 140 municipalities in 15 prefectures scarred from flooding. The sewage networks damaged by the typhoon affected civic life by paralyzing urban functions, raising concerns in urban flood risk and management. Increases in heavy rainfall events associated with global climate change are expected to increase damage from pluvial flooding, thereby necessitating reviews of current urban flood risk management for the purpose of making further improvements against future threats. As we enter an era of frequent urban flooding, it is vitally important that we prepare for urban flood risk management by sharing scientific and technological knowledge among academics, private companies, and administrators.

In this context, the current issue is a compilation of contemporary research studies in academia, technological advances in private companies, and practical applications in public administrations in Japan. The works include: the application of urban flood modeling in safe evacuation strategies, the assessment of economic loss, and the impact of climate change; state of the art technologies for urban flood management with the Internet of Things (IoT) and Internet Communication Technology (ICT), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), and the next generation of weather radars; and best practices for flood countermeasures, based on knowledge and experience from historical flooding and applied in prefectural governments and local municipalities.

We are grateful to all the authors and reviewers who contributed to this special issue, and we hope that it may internationally enhance knowledge-exchange in preparation for growing urban flood risks.

Review: pp. 310-320
Advances in Urban Stormwater Management in Japan: A Review
Abstract
Yoshihiro Shibuo and Hiroaki Furumai
Paper: pp. 321-328
Vulnerability to Mega Underground Inundation and Evacuation Assuming Devastating Urban Flood
Abstract
Yutaro Nakasaka and Taisuke Ishigaki
Paper: pp. 329-342
Estimation of Potential Economic Losses Due to Flooding Considering Variations of Spatial Distribution of Houses and Firms in a City
Abstract
Kaito Kotone, Kenji Taniguchi, Koichi Nakamura, and Yuki Takayama
Paper: pp. 343-350
Inundation Analysis of the Dike Breach of the Chikuma River Taking Drainage Process and House Damage into Consideration
Abstract
Makoto Takeda, Daisuke Sato, Kenji Kawaike, and Masashi Toyota
Paper: pp. 351-362
Impact of Climate Change on Flood Hazard at Airports on Pacific Islands: A Case Study of Faleolo International Airport, Samoa
Abstract
Lianhui Wu, Kenji Taniguchi, and Yoshimitsu Tajima
Paper: pp. 363-370
Reliability Assessment in Wireless Apparatus Using LoRa and Sigfox in Catch Basin
Abstract
Wataru Kobayashi
Paper: pp. 371-380
Applicability of High-Resolution Geospatial Data Obtained by UAV Photogrammetry to Develop Drainage System Models for Pluvial Flood Analysis
Abstract
Kyuhyun Park, Yoshihiro Shibuo, Junichi Katayama, Shinji Baba, and Hiroaki Furumai
Survey Report: pp. 381-386
Validation of Inundation Damage Reduction by a Pump Gate with the New Type of Horizontal Axial Submersible Pump
Abstract
Kentaro Fukumori, Yu Kurita, and Hiroaki Furumai
Paper: pp. 387-394
Evaluation of Real-Time Water Level Prediction Technology Using Statistical Models for Reducing Urban Flood Risk
Abstract
Mitsuhiro Nakashima, Shoichi Sameshima, Yuki Kimura, and Midori Yoshimoto
Survey Report: pp. 395-402
Development and Evaluation of ICT Operation Support System for Urban Flood Control Facilities
Abstract
Yusuke Sakae, Masaya Endo, and Yoshikazu Nakayama
Survey Report: pp. 403-409
Demonstration of Stormwater Management Technology by Short-Term Rainfall Prediction and Real-Time Runoff Analysis System Using Small X-Band Radar
Abstract
Ryo Matsuoka and Shinichiro Oki
Note: pp. 410-414
Study on Water Level Prediction Using Observational Data from a Multi-Parameter Phased Array Weather Radar
Abstract
Kazuhiro Yoshimi, Masakazu Wada, and Yukio Hiraoka
Review: pp. 415-420
The Trend in Measures Against Urban Inundation in Japan
Abstract
Hiroyuki Kato
Survey Report: pp. 421-428
Evolutionary Transition of Stormwater Pump System in Tokyo
Abstract
Hiroaki Mitamura and Masaki Fujie
Survey Report: pp. 429-436
Scenario Analysis of Sluice Gate Operations for Evaluating Inland Flood Damage
Abstract
Hiromichi Muroi, Kensuke Mine, and Yoshiki Eguchi
Material: pp. 437-441
Examination of Flood Countermeasures Utilizing a Yokohama City Main Rainwater Pipeline and Public–Private Anti-Flood Measures
Abstract
Masato Hayakawa, Tomohiko Nakajima, and Ryo Hakoda

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 443-456
Changing Narratives of Survivors of the 2014 Hiroshima Landslide
Abstract
Rie Kawasaki and Atsushi Hikita
Paper: pp. 457-468
Collaborative Development of Green Infrastructure: Urban Flood Control Measures on Small-Scale Private Lands
Abstract
Fumiko Taura, Masaki Ohme, and Yukihiro Shimatani

No.2

(Feb)

Special Issue on Disaster Storytelling, in Commemoration of 2020 TeLL-Net Forum, Kobe, Japan

Special Issue on Disaster Storytelling, in Commemoration of 2020 TeLL-Net Forum, Kobe, Japan

Editorial: pp. 125-126
Disaster Storytelling, in Commemoration of 2020 TeLL-Net Forum, Kobe, Japan
Shingo Nagamatsu, Masahiro Sawada, Yuichi Ono, Naoto Tanaka, Mayumi Sakamoto, Ryoga Ishihara, Masaru Sakato, Shosuke Sato, and Elizabeth Maly

This special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research focuses on disaster storytelling, an emerging concept in disaster risk reduction. Despite its popularity and importance, its individual practices and activities, as they tend to be spontaneous and local, have received only limited attention from academia and have not been given special attention by the disaster research community.

The papers included in this volume contain multi-dimensional discussions on disaster storytelling, including ones that focus on concepts and theory, the functions of disaster museums, tourism, local communities, UNESCO geoparks, disaster ruins and heritage, art and culture, and disaster education. The readers can understand the variety of disaster storytelling activities that exist around the world and their potential contribution to building resilience in society. We believe this issue is the first academic publication to focus specifically on disaster storytelling, and we hope that this volume contributes to creating scientific value, attracts additional attention, and develops further discussions about the role of disaster storytelling within the disaster research community. We also believe that such discussions will help various individuals and entities reidentify the importance and significance of their activities of disaster storytelling as well as contribute to continuing or strengthening such activities around the world.

All of the contributors to this issue participated in the International Forum on Telling Live Lessons from Disasters (TeLL-Net Forum), held January 24–26, 2020 in Kobe, Japan. The articles included in this issue include ones that were inspired by discussions during and after the forum. Readers interested in this forum can obtain the official report from the TeLL-Net website: https://tell-net.jp/forum2020/pdf/00_Tell_Net2020_Report_print.pdf.

We, the editorial board of this special issue, would like to express our deep appreciation to the Hyogo Earthquake Memorial 21st Century Research Institute for the research grant on disaster storytelling. We also would like to express our grati...<more>

Paper: pp. 127-134
Why Does Disaster Storytelling Matter for a Resilient Society?
Abstract
Shingo Nagamatsu, Yoshinobu Fukasawa, and Ikuo Kobayashi
Survey Report: pp. 135-140
The Role of Museums in Telling Live Lessons
Abstract
Yuichi Ono, Marlene Murray, Makoto Sakamoto, Hiroshi Sato, Pornthum Thumwimol, Vipakorn Thumwimol, and Ratchaneekorn Thongthip
Note: pp. 141-145
Disaster Storytelling and Volcanic Eruptions Caused by Debris Avalanches on Mt. Bandai in Aizu and Mt. Unzendake and Mt. Mayuyama in Shimabara
Abstract
Hiroshi Sato and Yuichi Ono
Survey Report: pp. 146-156
Disaster Museums in Japan: Telling the Stories of Disasters Before and After 3.11
Abstract
Elizabeth Maly and Mariko Yamazaki
Note: pp. 157-162
Disaster Tourism as a Tool for Disaster Story Telling
Abstract
Naoto Tanaka, Ikaptra, Satoru Kusano, Mariko Yamazaki, and Kazuo Matsumoto
Paper: pp. 163-169
Transferring Historical Disaster Memories: The 1925 North Tajima Earthquake
Abstract
Mayumi Sakamoto
Letter: pp. 170-175
Geotourism and Disaster Storytelling: Lessons from 2013 Izu-Oshima Island Debris Flow Disaster
Abstract
Kana Nishitani, Kazuyuki Nakagawa, and Shingo Nagamatsu
Survey Report: pp. 176-181
The Role of the “Mediator” in Sustainable Preservation and Utilization of Disaster Remains – Report from the 2020 International Forum on Telling Live Lessons from Disasters –
Abstract
Ryoga Ishihara and Isao Hayashi
Paper: pp. 182-193
Memories and Conflicts of Disaster Victims: Why They Wish to Dismantle Disaster Remains
Abstract
Nao Sakaguchi
Paper: pp. 194-200
Role of Heritage Activism in Post-Disaster Reconstruction
Abstract
Sanjaya Uprety and Barsha Shrestha
Survey Report: pp. 201-209
Challenges in the Preservation of Disaster Remains – Example of the Chelungpu Fault Preservation Park
Abstract
Cheng-Shing Chiang, Tyan-Ming Chu, Wen-Hao Chou, Shin-Ho Lee, and Jer-Fu Wang
Survey Report: pp. 210-215
Documentary Film ‘Survivor’ Preserved as a Disaster Record
Abstract
Shiti Maghfira and Anna Matsukawa
Survey Report: pp. 216-223
Learning from the Training for the Successors and Storytellers the Legacy of Atomic Bombing in Hiroshima City: Lessons for Disaster Storytellers
Abstract
Shosuke Sato and Masahiro Iwasaki
Letter: pp. 224-227
International Post-Disaster Cooperation Toward Recovery and Keeping Memories Alive –Exploring Their Close Relationship–
Abstract
Masaru Sakato
Paper: pp. 228-233
Disaster Storytelling: Extending the Memory of the Community Toward Disaster Preparedness from Myth, Scientific Explanation, and Popular Culture
Abstract
Eko Prawoto and Linda Octavia
Review: pp. 234-240
Strengthening Disaster Response and Resilience in Lao PDR - A Decade of Learning Since Typhoon Ketsana
Abstract
Dina Vivona and Manivanh Suyavong
Survey Report: pp. 241-243
Role of Oral Transmission in Disaster Prevention Education – Significance of Disaster Folklore in Modern Times –
Abstract
Manabu Fujii, Erina Tamano, and Kazuya Hattori
Survey Report: pp. 244-249
Education for Disaster Risk Reduction in Hyogo to Be Handed Down Through Generations
Abstract
Yasuhito Kawata, Kensuke Takenouchi, and Katsuya Yamori
Paper: pp. 250-262
Making Evacuation Routine Behavior: Impact of Experiencing Severe Flood Damage on Recognition and Advance Evacuation Behavior
Abstract
Masato Tanaka and Minori Shimomura
Survey Report: pp. 263-273
Evaluation of Listeners Reaction on the Storytelling of Disaster Response Experience: The Case of Service Continuity at Miyagi Prefectural Office After Experiencing the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Shosuke Sato and Fumihiko Imamura

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 275-286
Developing an Automated System for Simple Estimation of the Direct Damage Amounts from Earthquakes
Abstract
Masaki Ikeda, Qinglin Cui, Toshihisa Toyoda, Hiromitsu Nakamura, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
Note: pp. 287-297
Study Concept on the Development of an Urban Cyber Physical System for Enhancing the Capability to Respond to Large-Scale Earthquakes
Abstract
Toshihiko Horiuchi, Koichi Kajiwara, Takuzo Yamashita, Takashi Aoki, Tomonari Yashiro, Yoshihide Sekimoto, Mikio Koshihara, and Hideki Koizumi
Errata: p. 298
Erratum for “Verbal Expressions of Risk Communication: A Case Study After the 3.11 Crisis” (Vol.9, pp. 644-652, 2014)
Abstract
Shinichiro Okamoto and Toshiko Kikkawa

No.1

(Jan)

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics

Editorial: p. 5
COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics
Sumio Shinoda, Hideaki Karaki, and Haruo Hayashi

COVID-2019 was first identified in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019, and from there it spread worldwide. Due to this worldwide distribution of COVID-19 cases, the WHO declared a COVID-19 pandemic. The pathogen of COVID-19, a novel corona virus, resembles SARS-CoV, the pathogen of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome, a pandemic in 2003), so the International Committee on Taxonomy Virology named it SARS-CoV-2. However, COVID-19 is a different disease from SARS, and should be controlled to the extent possible with the effective vaccines and therapeutic medicines.

Although one year has passed since the first appearance of the disease, the number of COVID-19 cases continues to increase, and the pandemic is now in its third large wave. It is thought that it will be difficult to eradicate the disease completely, because SARS-CoV-2 is possible to invade and live in various host animals in addition to humans.

During this pandemic, the JDR has put together the special issue “COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics.” Because there have been many pandemics that have transformed society in various ways, the special issue includes historical pandemics in addition to COVID-19. The manuscripts in this issue include various subjects related to COVID-19, including methods of analyzing the pandemic, suggestions for countermeasures against it, methods of prevention and epidemiological reviews, among others.

The WHO has released a large volume of pandemic information on an ongoing basis, including its “COVID-19 Weekly Epidemiological Update.” In the weekly edition of December 27, it reported the cumulative number of cases and percentages of the global total from around the world: the Americas 34,403,371 (43%), Europe 25,271 (31%), Africa 1,831,227 (2%), and the Western Pacific 1.059,751 (1%). It is notable that 74% of cumulative global total number of cases have been reported in the Americas and Europe, where most developed countries are included, whereas the numbers in Africa, which includes many developing countries, and the Western Pacific region, which includes Thailand, the Philippines, Vietna...<more>

Material: pp. 6-11
COVID-19 Outbreak Forecasting and Effects of Self-Restraint Against Excursions in Tokyo, Japan, as of the End of March, 2020, Before the Emergency Declaration on April 7, 2020
Abstract
Yoshiyuki Sugishita, Junko Kurita, Tamie Sugawara, and Yasushi Ohkusa
Note: pp. 12-15
An Analysis of the COVID-19 Epidemic in Japan Using a Logistic Model
Abstract
Kuniaki Miyamoto
Note: pp. 16-23
OxCGRT-Based Evaluation of Anti-COVID-19 Measures Taken by Japanese Prefectures
Abstract
Shinya Kumagai, Tomomi Aoyama, Eri Ino, and Kenji Watanabe
Paper: pp. 24-30
Twitter Sentiment Analysis of Bangkok Tourism During COVID-19 Pandemic Using Support Vector Machine Algorithm
Abstract
Thanapat Sontayasara, Sirawit Jariyapongpaiboon, Arnon Promjun, Napat Seelpipat, Kumpol Saengtabtim, Jing Tang, and Natt Leelawat
Paper: pp. 31-39
Study of New Normal Business Continuity to Improve Resilience Against Uncertain Threat
Abstract
Hideki Goromaru, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yoshihisa Ueda, and Sumiko Fukaya
Note: pp. 40-47
A Study of Issues Related to the Operation of Evacuation Shelters in a Corona-Endemic Society – Through the Guidelines and Training of Shiga Prefecture in Japan
Abstract
Seiko Takaoka, Yasuhito Kawata, and Tatsuro Kai
Paper: pp. 48-55
Social Media: New Trends in Emergency Information
Abstract
Changchun Feng, Kabilijiang Umaier, Takaaki Kato, and Qiushan Li
Note: pp. 56-60
The Impact of COVID-19 on the Global Supply Chain: A Discussion on Decentralization of the Supply Chain and Ensuring Interoperability
Abstract
Eri Ino and Kenji Watanabe
Review: pp. 61-69
Prevention of COVID-19 Infection with Personal Protective Equipment
Abstract
Noriko Shimasaki and Hideaki Morikawa
Review: pp. 70-83
Characteristic Features of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic: Attention to the Management and Control in Egypt
Abstract
Nourhan H. El-Subbagh, Rana Rabie, Aya A. Mahfouz, Khaled M. Aboelsuod, Mohamed Y. Elshabrawy, Haneen M. Abdelaleem, Basant E. Elhammady, Weam Abosaleh, Lamiaa A. Salama, Sara Badreldeen, Mohamed Yasser, and Abdelaziz Elgaml
Survey Report: pp. 84-87
The Novel Coronavirus Pandemic and the State of the Epidemic in Kobe, Japan
Abstract
Noriko Nakanishi and Yoshio Iijima
Review: pp. 88-96
Air Pollutants During COVID-19 Lockdown Period in India
Abstract
Vignesh K. S. and Padma Venkatasubramanian
Review: pp. 97-109
Epidemiology of the Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Several Remarkable Pandemics
Abstract
Sumio Shinoda
Review: pp. 110-117
A Re-Look at Cholera Pandemics from Early Times to Now in the Current Era of Epidemiology
Abstract
Thandavarayan Ramamurthy and Amit Ghosh

Vol.15 (2020)

No.7

(Dec)

The Sixth JDR Award
Special Issue on the Second World Bosai Forum
Mini Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 3

The Sixth JDR Award

Award: p. 815
Congratulations! The Sixth JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
Award: p. 816
Presenting the Sixth JDR Award
Setsuya Nakada
Award: p. 817
Message from the Winner
Masato Iguchi

Special Issue on the Second World Bosai Forum

Editorial: p. 821
the Second World Bosai Forum
Yuichi Ono, Anawat Suppasri, Elizabeth Maly, and Daisuke Sasaki

The World Bosai Forum/International Disaster Risk Conference@Sendai 2019 (WBF2019) held in November 2019 in Sendai City, Japan, was successful in bringing together actors from multiple sectors to advance the goals of disaster risk reduction (DRR). We would like to take this opportunity to express our heartfelt gratitude to all those who participated in the sessions, exhibitions, poster sessions, and mini-presentations, as well as to the many local people who came to the event.

According to the World Bosai Forum [1], 871 participants from 38 countries attended the WBF2019 which included 50 oral sessions, 3 keynote speeches, 47 poster sessions, 33 mini-presentations, and 14 exhibition booths, which contributed to deepening the discussion and promotion of the “Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, 2015–2030” (SFDRR) and in particular progress towards the achievement of Global Target E, to substantially increase the number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020. Including lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, local knowledge and solutions towards advancing BOSAI were actively shared and discussed among the participants who joined this global forum, from various organizations and sectors. In particular, there were many sessions in which young people and private companies played a key role.

The guest editors are pleased to publish this special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research, which is comprised of 13 articles sharing the research advancements presented at the WBF2019. We hope that this special issue on the WBF2019 will contribute to the literature on disaster science and further advances in disaster risk reduction.

Paper: pp. 822-832
Statistical Analysis of Building Damage from the 2013 Super Typhoon Haiyan and its Storm Surge in the Philippines
Abstract
Tanaporn Chaivutitorn, Thawalrat Tanasakcharoen, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, Carl Vincent C. Caro, Alfredo Mahar Francisco A. Lagmay, Anawat Suppasri, Jeremy D. Bricker, Volker Roeber, Carine J. Yi, and Fumihiko Imamura
Paper: pp. 833-844
Social, Economic and Health Effects of the 2016 Alberta Wildfires: Pediatric Resilience
Abstract
Julie L. Drolet, Caroline McDonald-Harker, Nasreen Lalani, Meagan McNichol, Matthew R. G. Brown, and Peter H. Silverstone
Paper: pp. 845-854
Learning from a Post-Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda Recovery Institution (OPARR): A New Research Agenda for Recovery Governance
Abstract
Kanako Iuchi, Yasuhito Jibiki, and Beth Tamayose
Note: pp. 855-867
Consideration of the World BOSAI Forum/IDRC 2017 and the World BOSAI Forum/IDRC 2019 in Sendai Through a Comparison of the Two Forums
Abstract
Kanayo Kousaka
Material: pp. 868-877
Transdisciplinary Approach for Building Societal Resilience to Disasters – Interpreting the Processes of Creating New Knowledge in the Context of Knowledge Management –
Abstract
Senro Kuraoka, Youb Raj Paudyal, and Khamarrul Azahari Razak
Paper: pp. 878-889
Towards a Comparative Framework of Adaptive Planning and Anticipatory Action Regimes in Chile, Japan, and the US: An Exploration of Multiple Contexts Informing Tsunami Risk-Based Planning and Relocation
Abstract
Naoko Kuriyama, Elizabeth Maly, Jorge León, Daniel Abramson, Lan T. Nguyen, and Ann Bostrom
Survey Report: pp. 890-899
Advances of International Collaboration on M9 Disaster Science: Scientific Session Report
Abstract
Elizabeth Maly, Kenjiro Terada, Randall J. LeVeque, Naoko Kuriyama, Daniel B. Abramson, Lan T. Nguyen, Ann Bostrom, Jorge León, Michael Motley, Patricio A. Catalan, Shunichi Koshimura, Shuji Moriguchi, Yuya Yamaguchi, Carrie Garrison-Laney, Anawat Suppasri, and Erick Mas
Material: pp. 900-912
WBF-2019 Core Research Cluster of Disaster Science Planning Session as Disaster Preparedness: Participation in a Training Program for Conductor-Type Disaster Healthcare Personnel
Abstract
Junko Okuyama, Hiroyuki Sasaki, Shuji Seto, Yu Fukuda, Toshiki Iwasaki, Toru Matsuzawa, Kiyoshi Ito, Takako Izumi, Hiroki Takakura, Fumihiko Imamura, and Tadashi Ishi
Survey Report: pp. 913-918
Recent Progress Achieved by the Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS)
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki and Yuichi Ono
Paper: pp. 919-930
Sustainable Community Development for Disaster Resilience Using the Fukuzumi-Machi Method and Human Resources Development for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Takeshi Sato, Aiko Sakurai, Yuki Sadaike, Yukiko Ouchi, and Yasuo Sugawara
Paper: pp. 931-942
Sustainable Community Development for Disaster Resilience and Human Resources Development for Disaster Risk Reduction – Growth and Community Contribution of the Katahira Children’s Board for Community Development –
Abstract
Takeshi Sato, Aiko Sakurai, Yuki Sadaike, Risa Yanagiya, and Hitoshi Konno
Paper: pp. 943-958
Spatial Distribution of Causes of Death in the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami at Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture
Abstract
Tomoki Serikawa, Shuji Seto, Anawat Suppasri, and Fumihiko Imamura
Paper: pp. 959-968
Study of Reflections on University Fieldwork Courses: The Characteristics of Learning Content of Students Who Visited Disaster-Affected Areas
Abstract
Yu Takahashi, Shun Nakazawa, and Hideyuki Sasaki

Mini Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 3

Editorial: p. 969
the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 3
Yuichi Ono, Daisuke Sasaki, and Anawat Suppasri

The Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS) at the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) at Tohoku University was established in April 2015 to support the monitoring of the global targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 (SFDRR). The GCDS, in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), is to provide support for National Disaster Management Offices (NDMOs) to build capacity in developing national disaster loss and damage statistics, an essential tool used in monitoring and policy making for the reduction of disaster risk. Since its establishment, the GCDS has been contributing to the implementation of the SFDRR.

In 2019, the GCDS participated in the Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments (SFVCs), launched by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR). Although the information regarding the activities of the GCDS is described in detail in the first Synthesis and Analysis Report of the SFVC [1], one of the activities committed to in its SFVC is to publish special issues of the Journal of Disaster Research as a contribution to the development of disaster statistics. The guest editors are pleased to publish the third special issue, which contains valuable academic articles closely related to the activities of the GCDS.

We hope that this special issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics makes a significant contribution to the literature on disaster statistics and accelerates its development.

Paper: pp. 970-974
Measurement of Disaster Damage Utilizing Disaster Statistics: A Case Study Analyzing the Data of Indonesia
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki, Makoto Okumura, and Yuichi Ono
Survey Report: pp. 975-980
Implementation of Post Disaster Needs Assessment in Indonesia: Literature Review
Abstract
Yasuhito Jibiki, Dicky Pelupessy, Daisuke Sasaki, and Kanako Iuchi
Paper: pp. 981-990
Case Reasoning-Based Emergency Decision Making for Oil and Gas Accidents
Abstract
Ruifang La, Zaixu Zhang, and Pengfei Bai
Paper: pp. 991-1010
Effects of Radioactive Contamination from the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site on Behavior Related to Food Choices: A Case Study of Kazakhstan
Abstract
Tetsuya Nakamura, Satoru Masuda, Akifumi Kuchiki, and Atsushi Maruyama

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 1011-1024
The Determinants of Residents’ Evacuation Behavior in the Torrential Rain in Western Japan in 2018: Examination of Survey Data of Victims in Okayama Prefecture
Abstract
Shoji Ohtomo, Reo Kimura, Yoshiaki Kawata, and Keiko Tamura
Paper: pp. 1025-1039
Assessing Flood Risk of the Chao Phraya River Basin Based on Statistical Rainfall Analysis
Abstract
Shakti P. C., Mamoru Miyamoto, Ryohei Misumi, Yousuke Nakamura, Anurak Sriariyawat, Supattra Visessri, and Daiki Kakinuma

No.6

(Oct)

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020

Editorial: p. 675
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020
Haruo Hayashi and Ryohei Misumi

We are very pleased to publish the Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020. There are nine papers in this issue.

The first two papers concern hazard and risk information systems: Sano et al. constructed a real-time risk information map for flood and landslide disasters, and Hirashima et al. created an alert system for snow removal from rooftops. These systems are already in use on the NIED website. The next three papers are case studies of recent storm disasters in Japan and the United States: Cui et al. analyzed the time variation in the distribution of damage reports in the headquarters for heavy-rainfall disaster control in Fukuoka, Shakti et al. studied flood disasters caused by Typhoon Hagibis (2019), and Iizuka and Sakai conducted a meteorological analysis of Hurricane Harvey (2017). Regarding volcanic disasters, Tanada and Nakamura reported the results of an electromagnetic survey of Mt. Nasudake.

This special issue also includes three papers on large-scale model experimentation: Danjo and Ishizawa studied the rainfall infiltration process using NIED’s Large-Scale Rainfall Simulator, Kawamata and Nakazawa conducted experiments concerning liquefaction, and Nakazawa et al. reported the results of experiments on seismic retrofits for road embankments. The experiments used E-Defense, the world’s largest three-dimensional shaking table.

We hope this issue will provide useful information for all readers studying natural disasters.

Paper: pp. 676-687
Generation of Risk Information Based on Comprehensive Real-Time Analysis of Flooding and Landslide Disaster Occurrence Hazard and Social Vulnerability
Abstract
Hiroaki Sano, Yuichiro Usuda, Ichiro Iwai, Hitoshi Taguchi, Ryohei Misumi, and Haruo Hayashi
Paper: pp. 688-697
Development of a Snow Load Alert System, “YukioroSignal” for Aiding Roof Snow Removal Decisions in Snowy Areas in Japan
Abstract
Hiroyuki Hirashima, Tsutomu Iyobe, Katsuhisa Kawashima, and Hiroaki Sano
Paper: pp. 698-711
Time Series Analysis on the Damage Report of the Northern Kyushu Heavy Rainfall in July 2017
Abstract
Qinglin Cui, Makoto Hanashima, and Yuichiro Usuda
Paper: pp. 712-725
Flood Inundation Mapping of the Hitachi Region in the Kuji River Basin, Japan, During the October 11–13, 2019 Extreme Rain Event
Abstract
Shakti P. C., Kohin Hirano, and Satoshi Iizuka
Paper: pp. 726-734
What Factors Contributed to the Torrential Rainfall of Hurricane Harvey over Texas?
Abstract
Satoshi Iizuka and Naoki Sakai
Paper: pp. 735-744
Subsurface Resistivity Imaging of Nasudake (Chausudake) Volcano Determined from Time Domain Electromagnetic Survey (TDEM)
Abstract
Toshikazu Tanada and Yoichi Nakamura
Paper: pp. 745-753
Quantitative Evaluation of the Relationship Between Slope Gradient and Infiltration Capacity Based on a Rainfall Experiment Using Pit Sand
Abstract
Toru Danjo and Tomohiro Ishizawa
Paper: pp. 754-764
Influences on Liquefaction-Induced Damage of Pore Water Seepage into an Unsaturated Surface Layer
Abstract
Yohsuke Kawamata and Hiroshi Nakazawa
Paper: pp. 765-781
Full-Scale Experiment of Earthquake Resistant Embankment Using Flexible Container Bag
Abstract
Hiroshi Nakazawa, Yohsuke Kawamata, Satoru Shibuya, Shoji Kato, Kyung-Beom Jeong, Jemin Baek, Tara Nidhi Lohani, Akihira Morita, Osamu Takemoto, and Yoshitaka Moriguchi

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 783-793
Action Research on Bosai Map Cycle –Communications and Interactions Among Stakeholders Involved in Mapmaking Activities–
Abstract
Natsumi Okada and Katsuya Yamori
Paper: pp. 794-801
Consideration of Evacuation Drills Utilizing the Capabilities of People with Special Needs
Abstract
Takashi Sugiyama and Katsuya Yamori

No.5

(Aug)

Special Issue on SATREPS Area-BCM

Special Issue on SATREPS Area-BCM

Editorial: p. 545
SATREPS Area-BCM
Kenji Watanabe

This special issue summarizes the main results of the first two years of the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) project, which is supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). SATREPS has provided excellent opportunities for our joint research team from Thailand and Japan to work in close coordination on challenging multidisciplinary issues.

The Area-BCM for the Enhancement of Resilience of Industrial Complexes in Thailand project was started in 2018. Its scope includes the impacts of urban flooding disasters in Bangkok and its surrounding areas where socio-economic functionalities have been concentrated, as well as chain repercussions of disaster impacts, spread through global supply chains, in important production and logistics facilities in Thailand. Our high-level project targets are based on the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) 2015–2030 as well as Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially #11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities), #8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth), and #13 (Climate Action).

This issue contains interim research results from our project mainly led by members from Thailand with regional aspects of our project site. However, we plan to release another special issue by the end of our project that will include more generalized concepts and frameworks that can be applicable to other regions or countries, including Japan.

As we take a multidisciplinary approach that includes science and technology, life and well-being science, and social science, our main objective in featuring this special issue is to make our interim research results known to other researchers and practitioners in related fields. We do this in order to get opinions and suggestions from different perspectives so that these may be reflected in the directions our research takes during the remainder of our project term.

Finally, I am truly grateful for the authors’ insightful contributions and the referees’ acute professional suggestions, which together ...<more>

Review: pp. 546-555
Business Continuity Management: A Preliminary Systematic Literature Review Based on ScienceDirect Database
Abstract
Kananut Charoenthammachoke, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, and Akira Kodaka
Paper: pp. 556-570
Finding the Devastating Economic Disaster’s Root Causes of the 2011 Flood in Thailand: Why Did Supply Chains Make the Disaster Worse?
Abstract
Tadashi Nakasu, Mamoru Miyamoto, Ruttiya Bhula-or, Tartat Mokkhamakkul, Sutee Anantsuksomsri, Yot Amornkitvikai, Sutpratana Duangkaew, and Toshio Okazumi
Paper: pp. 571-578
Assessment of Natural Disaster Coping Capacity from Social Capital Perspectives: A Case Study of Bangkok
Abstract
Sutee Anantsuksomsri and Nij Tontisirin
Review: pp. 579-587
Flood Management in the Context of Climate and Land-Use Changes and Adaptation Within the Chao Phraya River Basin
Abstract
Supattra Visessri and Chaiwat Ekkawatpanit
Review: pp. 588-598
A Stakeholder Analysis Approach for Area Business Continuity Management: A Systematic Review
Abstract
Sansanee Sapapthai, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, Akira Kodaka, Chatpan Chintanapakdee, Eri Ino, and Kenji Watanabe
Paper: pp. 599-608
Households’ Evacuation Decisions in Response to the 2011 Flood in Thailand
Abstract
Ruttiya Bhula-or, Tadashi Nakasu, Tartat Mokkhamakkul, Sutee Anantsuksomsri, Yot Amornkitvikai, Kullachart Prathumchai, and Sutpratana Duangkaew
Paper: pp. 609-620
Flood Disaster Risk Reduction for Urban Collective Housing in Thailand
Abstract
Yukiko Tahira and Akiyuki Kawasaki
Review: pp. 621-631
Understanding Households’ Perceptions of Risk Communication During a Natural Disaster: A Case Study of the 2011 Flood in Thailand
Abstract
Kullachart Prathumchai and Ruttiya Bhula-or

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 633-644
Estimating the Nankai Trough Megathrust Earthquake’s Anticipated Fiscal Impact on Japanese Governments
Abstract
Takeshi Miyazaki and Shingo Nagamatsu
Paper: pp. 645-654
Repeating Earthquakes Along the Colombian Subduction Zone
Abstract
Juan Carlos Bermúdez-Barrios and Hiroyuki Kumagai
Paper: pp. 655-663
Emergency Broadcasting Radio in Indonesia: Comparative Studies in Lombok and Palu
Abstract
Ressi Dwiana, Ade Armando, and Mario Antonius Birowo

No.4

(Jun)

Regular papers

No.3

(Mar)

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project Part 2: Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project Part 2: Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar

Editorial: p. 241
SATREPS Myanmar Project Part 2: Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar
Kimiro Meguro and Yudai Honma

This special issue summarizes the main results of the latter half of a five-year project called SATREPS (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development) supported by Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). The project title is “Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar” and it is the first SATREPS project adopted in Myanmar. Yangon Technological University (YTU) is a major counterpart organization and both national and local governmental organizations are working together as strategic partners.

In the first half of the project, a database was constructed, composed of important data for assessing urban safety and disaster risk, such as the ground properties, and distribution of buildings, people, and traffic. Using the database, city development model and evaluation models for flood and earthquake risks were developed.

In the latter half of the project, combining these two evaluation models, a system was developed for discussing future damage differences due to different urban plans and countermeasures. Furthermore, regarding flood, near-real-time flood inundation simulation system was developed. Related to earthquake disaster, a support system was developed for implementation of efficient countermeasures for both pre- and post-disaster. For infrastructure maintenance, performance monitoring and maintenance methods were proposed. Finally, in order to continue research activities and promote a continuous utilization of project results, a consortium scheme in which industry, government, and academia can work together has been created.

We hope that our SATREPS project activities can contribute to proper urban development and improvement of disaster management issues not only in Myanmar but also in other Asian countries.

Paper: pp. 242-255
Development of Flood Damage Estimation Model for Agriculture – Case Study in the Bago Floodplain, Myanmar
Abstract
Shelly Win, Win Win Zin, and Akiyuki Kawasaki
Paper: pp. 256-266
Characteristics of the 2018 Bago River Flood of Myanmar
Abstract
Daisuke Komori, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Nanami Sakai, Natsumi Shimomura, Akira Harada, Kohei Okuda, Chit Bo Bo Win, Aye Myat Thu, Khin Yadanar Tun, Wai Toe, and Win Win Zin
Paper: pp. 267-276
Estimation of Run-of-River Hydropower Potential in the Myitnge River Basin
Abstract
Kyu Kyu Thin, Win Win Zin, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Abdul Moiz, and Seemanta Sharma Bhagabati
Paper: pp. 277-287
Developing Flood Inundation Map Using RRI and SOBEK Models: A Case Study of the Bago River Basin, Myanmar
Abstract
Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Ralph Allen Acierto, and Tin Zar Oo
Paper: pp. 288-299
Impact of Bias-Correction Methods in Assessing the Potential Flood Frequency Change in the Bago River
Abstract
Ralph Allen E. Acierto, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Win Win Zin
Paper: pp. 300-311
Multivariate Flood Loss Estimation of the 2018 Bago Flood in Myanmar
Abstract
Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Georg Hörmann, Ralph Allen Acierto, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, and Aye Myat Thu
Paper: pp. 312-323
User Stories-Based Requirement Elicitation for Data Visualization to Support Decision Making in Water Resource Management at Bago River Basin
Abstract
Akira Kodaka, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Naruhiko Shirai, Ralph Allen Acierto, Win Win Zin, and Naohiko Kohtake
Survey Report: pp. 324-334
Projecting the Impact of Climate Change on Temperature, Precipitation, and Discharge in the Bago River Basin
Abstract
Hnin Thiri Myo, Win Win Zin, Kyi Pyar Shwe, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Ralph Allen Acierto
Survey Report: pp. 335-343
Improving River Bathymetry and Topography Representation of a Low-Lying Flat River Basin by Integrating Multiple Sourced Datasets
Abstract
Seemanta Sharma Bhagabati, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Wataru Takeuchi, and Win Win Zin
Note: pp. 344-352
Application and Flood Discharge Analysis with Hydrological Model (WEB-DHM) in Bago River Basin
Abstract
Sann Win Maung, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Kyu Kyu Thin
Paper: pp. 353-359
Condition Monitoring of Yangon Circular Railway and Yangon–Mandalay Railway Based on Car-Body Acceleration Response Using a Portable Device
Abstract
Hein Thura Aung, Kazuki Inoue, Sao Hone Pha, and Wataru Takeuchi
Paper: pp. 360-367
Analysis of Seismic Performance of Suspension Bridge in Myanmar
Abstract
Punyawut Jiradilok, Kohei Nagai, Koji Matsumoto, Takeshi Yoshida, Tetsuro Goda, and Eiji Iwasaki
Paper: pp. 368-376
Evaluating Expectations for Training Transfer: Exploratory Study on a Capacity Development Project for Road and Bridge Technology in Myanmar
Abstract
Michael Henry, Kohei Nagai, Koji Matsumoto, and Hiroshi Yokota
Paper: pp. 377-386
Acquisition of Ground Information in Downtown Yangon for Bosai Operation Support System
Abstract
Tun Naing, Su Thinzar, Muneyoshi Numada, Khin Than Yu, and Kimiro Meguro
Paper: pp. 387-406
Earthquake Building Collapse Risk Estimation for 2040 in Yangon, Myanmar
Abstract
Osamu Murao, Tomohiro Tanaka, Kimiro Meguro, and Theing Shwe
Paper: pp. 407-415
Seismic Fragility Analysis of Poorly Built Timber Buildings in Yangon Slum Areas
Abstract
Khin Myat Kyaw, Chaitanya Krishna Gadagamma, Kyaw Kyaw, Hideomi Gokon, Osamu Murao, and Kimiro Meguro
Paper: pp. 416-425
An Investigation of Socioeconomic and Land Use Influence on Car Ownership in Yangon City
Abstract
Thiri Aung, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
Paper: pp. 426-436
Analysis of Bus Operation at Peak Hours Using Bus GPS Data: A Case Study of YBS-36
Abstract
Thet Htun Aung, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
Paper: pp. 437-445
Analysis of Trip Distributions of Human Mobility Patterns and Their Transit Behaviors Using Mobile Call Detail Records
Abstract
Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
Survey Report: pp. 446-450
Traffic Conditions and Route Choice of Road Users Between Two Roundabouts
Abstract
Lin Zarni Win, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
Note: pp. 451-460
Measuring Traffic Congestion Based on the Taxi Operations of Traditional and On-Demand Taxis in Yangon
Abstract
Moe Myint Mo, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto

No.2

(Mar)

Special Issue on Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program

Special Issue on Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program

Editorial: p. 69
Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program
Yuichiro Tanioka, Shingo Yoshida, Takao Ohminato, Aitaro Kato, and Noriko Kamaya

The Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program (2014–2018) carried out comprehensive research to mitigate disasters related to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The program selected multidisciplinary research in which earth scientists who study the processes of earthquake generation and volcanic eruptions, historians, archaeologists, human and social scientists, and engineers were all involved. The program aimed to collect pre-instrumental and pre-historical earthquake and volcanic data to understand earthquake and volcano disasters, to find risk evaluation techniques, and to evaluate disaster response and preparedness. Active collaborations between researchers from different science fields inspired new ideas and have driven various research in the program. New findings from the program have also created international collaborations and recognitions. Most of the results and new findings in the program have already been published in various internationally recognized journals and have greatly influenced scientific communities.

We believe that it is important to compile our findings from the last five years of the program and to publish the essence of our findings and published papers in this special issue. We hope that this special issue will be of value to researchers who are interested in multidisciplinary studies of mitigation of disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and related phenomena.

Review: pp. 70-75
Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program: An Overview
Abstract
Naoyuki Kato and Takeshi Nishimura
Survey Report: pp. 76-86
Research on Pre-Modern Earthquakes Based on Fusion of Humanities and Sciences
Abstract
Masaharu Ebara, Akihito Nishiyama, Taisuke Murata, and Reiko Sugimori
Review: pp. 87-95
Main Results from the Program Promotion Panel for Subduction-Zone Earthquakes
Abstract
Kazushige Obara and Takuya Nishimura
Review: pp. 96-105
The Advancement of Research on Inland Earthquake Generation 2014–2018
Abstract
Satoshi Matsumoto, Tomomi Okada, Toshiko Terakawa, Makoto Uyeshima, and Yoshihisa Iio
Review: pp. 106-111
Five-Year Achievements of Volcano Program Promotion Panel
Abstract
Takahiro Ohkura and Kenji Nogami
Review: pp. 112-143
Evaluation of Phenomena Preceding Earthquakes and Earthquake Predictability
Abstract
Masao Nakatani
Review: pp. 144-151
Prior and Real-Time Estimations of Ground Motions, Tsunamis, and Other Geodynamic Hazards
Abstract
Takao Kagawa and Yusaku Ohta
Review: pp. 152-164
Research for Contributing to the Field of Disaster Science: A Review
Abstract
Reo Kimura, Hiroe Miyake, Keiko Tamura, Naoyuki Kato, Yuichi Morita, Masato Iguchi, Yuichiro Tanioka, Kazuki Koketsu, Yoshihiko Kuroda, Hiromitsu Oshima, and Kenji Satake
Survey Report: pp. 165-173
General Research Group for the Nankai Trough Great Earthquake
Abstract
Takuo Shibutani
Review: pp. 174-186
Integrated Study on Forecasting Volcanic Hazards of Sakurajima Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Masato Iguchi, Haruhisa Nakamichi, and Takeshi Tameguri
Survey Report: pp. 187-201
Core-to-Core Collaborative Research Between Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo and Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University During FY2014 to FY2018
Abstract
Shinichi Matsushima

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 203-211
Development of Automatic Analysis and Data Visualization System for Volcano Muography
Abstract
Hiroyuki K. M. Tanaka
Paper: pp. 212-225
Questionnaire Survey on the Difficulty of Attending Work for Commuters After the 2018 Osaka Earthquake
Abstract
U Hiroi, Naoya Sekiya, Shuntarou Waragai, and Fusae Kukihara
Survey Report: pp. 226-232
Trends of Measures in Disaster Recovery Plans: Focusing on the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Hiroaki Goto and U Hiroi

No.1

(Feb)

The Fifth JDR Award

The Fifth JDR Award

Award: p. 3
Congratulations! Journal of Disaster Research The Fifth JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
Award: p. 4
Presenting the Fifth JDR Award
Naoshi Hirata
Award: p. 5
Message from the Winner
Yuichiro Usuda

Regular Papers

Paper: pp. 9-19
Evaluation of Seismic Vulnerability Indices for Low-Rise Reinforced Concrete Buildings Including Data from the 6 February 2016 Taiwan Earthquake
Abstract
Santiago Pujol, Lucas Laughery, Aishwarya Puranam, Pedram Hesam, Li-Hui Cheng, Alana Lund, and Ayhan Irfanoglu
Paper: pp. 20-40
Developing a Disaster Management Education and Training Program for Children with Intellectual Disabilities to Improve “Zest for Life” in the Event of a Disaster - A Case Study on Tochigi Prefectural Imaichi Special School for the Intellectually Disabled –
Abstract
Toshimitsu Nagata and Reo Kimura
Paper: pp. 41-52
A Study on Disaster Medical Response During the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Based on the Emergency Support Function – Nine Days at Iwate Prefecture from Hyperacute to Subacute Phase –
Abstract
Shinji Akitomi, Akira Koyama, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yuji Maeda, Reo Kimura, Keiko Tamura, Haruo Hayashi, and Kimiro Meguro
Letter: pp. 53-56
Air-Fall Ash from the Main Crater of Asama Volcano on August 7, 2019, and its Water-Soluble Components
Abstract
Muga Yaguchi, Akihiko Terada, and Yasuo Ogawa

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Last updated on Jul. 19, 2024