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JDR

Journal of Disaster Research

ISSN : 1881-2473(Print) / 1883-8030(Online)
DOI : 10.20965/jdr.issn.1883-8030
Editors-in-Chief :Suminao Murakami (Laboratory of Urban Safety Planning)
Haruo Hayashi (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention)

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2021-03-31T15:13:26+0000

Vol.16 (2021)

No.3

(Apr)

Special Issue on Actions Toward Futuristic Urban Flood Risk Research and Management NEW

Special Issue on Actions Toward Futuristic Urban Flood Risk Research and Management

: p. 309
Actions Toward Futuristic Urban Flood Risk Research and Management
Yoshihiro Shibuo, Kenji Kawaike, and Hiroaki Furumai

As rainfalls exceeding the designed level have increased, so has damage associated with pluvial flooding. Typhoon Hagibis, which swept Japan in 2019, left 140 municipalities in 15 prefectures scarred from flooding. The sewage networks damaged by the typhoon affected civic life by paralyzing urban functions, raising concerns in urban flood risk and management. Increases in heavy rainfall events associated with global climate change are expected to increase damage from pluvial flooding, thereby necessitating reviews of current urban flood risk management for the purpose of making further improvements against future threats. As we enter an era of frequent urban flooding, it is vitally important that we prepare for urban flood risk management by sharing scientific and technological knowledge among academics, private companies, and administrators.

In this context, the current issue is a compilation of contemporary research studies in academia, technological advances in private companies, and practical applications in public administrations in Japan. The works include: the application of urban flood modeling in safe evacuation strategies, the assessment of economic loss, and the impact of climate change; state of the art technologies for urban flood management with the Internet of Things (IoT) and Internet Communication Technology (ICT), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), and the next generation of weather radars; and best practices for flood countermeasures, based on knowledge and experience from historical flooding and applied in prefectural governments and local municipalities.

We are grateful to all the authors and reviewers who contributed to this special issue, and we hope that it may internationally enhance knowledge-exchange in preparation for growing urban flood risks.

: pp. 310-320
Advances in Urban Stormwater Management in Japan: A Review
Abstract
Yoshihiro Shibuo and Hiroaki Furumai
: pp. 321-328
Vulnerability to Mega Underground Inundation and Evacuation Assuming Devastating Urban Flood
Abstract
Yutaro Nakasaka and Taisuke Ishigaki
: pp. 329-342
Estimation of Potential Economic Losses Due to Flooding Considering Variations of Spatial Distribution of Houses and Firms in a City
Abstract
Kaito Kotone, Kenji Taniguchi, Koichi Nakamura, and Yuki Takayama
: pp. 343-350
Inundation Analysis of the Dike Breach of the Chikuma River Taking Drainage Process and House Damage into Consideration
Abstract
Makoto Takeda, Daisuke Sato, Kenji Kawaike, and Masashi Toyota
: pp. 351-362
Impact of Climate Change on Flood Hazard at Airports on Pacific Islands: A Case Study of Faleolo International Airport, Samoa
Abstract
Lianhui Wu, Kenji Taniguchi, and Yoshimitsu Tajima
: pp. 363-370
Reliability Assessment in Wireless Apparatus Using LoRa and Sigfox in Catch Basin
Abstract
Wataru Kobayashi
: pp. 371-380
Applicability of High-Resolution Geospatial Data Obtained by UAV Photogrammetry to Develop Drainage System Models for Pluvial Flood Analysis
Abstract
Kyuhyun Park, Yoshihiro Shibuo, Junichi Katayama, Shinji Baba, and Hiroaki Furumai
: pp. 381-386
Validation of Inundation Damage Reduction by a Pump Gate with the New Type of Horizontal Axial Submersible Pump
Abstract
Kentaro Fukumori, Yu Kurita, and Hiroaki Furumai
: pp. 387-394
Evaluation of Real-Time Water Level Prediction Technology Using Statistical Models for Reducing Urban Flood Risk
Abstract
Mitsuhiro Nakashima, Shoichi Sameshima, Yuki Kimura, and Midori Yoshimoto
: pp. 395-402
Development and Evaluation of ICT Operation Support System for Urban Flood Control Facilities
Abstract
Yusuke Sakae, Masaya Endo, and Yoshikazu Nakayama
: pp. 403-409
Demonstration of Stormwater Management Technology by Short-Term Rainfall Prediction and Real-Time Runoff Analysis System Using Small X-Band Radar
Abstract
Ryo Matsuoka and Shinichiro Oki
: pp. 410-414
Study on Water Level Prediction Using Observational Data from a Multi-Parameter Phased Array Weather Radar
Abstract
Kazuhiro Yoshimi, Masakazu Wada, and Yukio Hiraoka
: pp. 415-420
The Trend in Measures Against Urban Inundation in Japan
Abstract
Hiroyuki Kato
: pp. 421-428
Evolutionary Transition of Stormwater Pump System in Tokyo
Abstract
Hiroaki Mitamura and Masaki Fujie
: pp. 429-436
Scenario Analysis of Sluice Gate Operations for Evaluating Inland Flood Damage
Abstract
Hiromichi Muroi, Kensuke Mine, and Yoshiki Eguchi
: pp. 437-441
Examination of Flood Countermeasures Utilizing a Yokohama City Main Rainwater Pipeline and Public–Private Anti-Flood Measures
Abstract
Masato Hayakawa, Tomohiko Nakajima, and Ryo Hakoda

Regular Papers

: pp. 443-456
Changing Narratives of Survivors of the 2014 Hiroshima Landslide
Abstract
Rie Kawasaki and Atsushi Hikita
: pp. 457-468
Collaborative Development of Green Infrastructure: Urban Flood Control Measures on Small-Scale Private Lands
Abstract
Fumiko Taura, Masaki Ohme, and Yukihiro Shimatani

No.2

(Feb)

Special Issue on Disaster Storytelling, in Commemoration of 2020 TeLL-Net Forum, Kobe, Japan

Special Issue on Disaster Storytelling, in Commemoration of 2020 TeLL-Net Forum, Kobe, Japan

: pp. 125-126
Disaster Storytelling, in Commemoration of 2020 TeLL-Net Forum, Kobe, Japan
Shingo Nagamatsu, Masahiro Sawada, Yuichi Ono, Naoto Tanaka, Mayumi Sakamoto, Ryoga Ishihara, Masaru Sakato, Shosuke Sato, and Elizabeth Maly

This special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research focuses on disaster storytelling, an emerging concept in disaster risk reduction. Despite its popularity and importance, its individual practices and activities, as they tend to be spontaneous and local, have received only limited attention from academia and have not been given special attention by the disaster research community.

The papers included in this volume contain multi-dimensional discussions on disaster storytelling, including ones that focus on concepts and theory, the functions of disaster museums, tourism, local communities, UNESCO geoparks, disaster ruins and heritage, art and culture, and disaster education. The readers can understand the variety of disaster storytelling activities that exist around the world and their potential contribution to building resilience in society. We believe this issue is the first academic publication to focus specifically on disaster storytelling, and we hope that this volume contributes to creating scientific value, attracts additional attention, and develops further discussions about the role of disaster storytelling within the disaster research community. We also believe that such discussions will help various individuals and entities reidentify the importance and significance of their activities of disaster storytelling as well as contribute to continuing or strengthening such activities around the world.

All of the contributors to this issue participated in the International Forum on Telling Live Lessons from Disasters (TeLL-Net Forum), held January 24–26, 2020 in Kobe, Japan. The articles included in this issue include ones that were inspired by discussions during and after the forum. Readers interested in this forum can obtain the official report from the TeLL-Net website: https://tell-net.jp/forum2020/pdf/00_Tell_Net2020_Report_print.pdf.

We, the editorial board of this special issue, would like to express our deep appreciation to the Hyogo Earthquake Memorial 21st Century Research Institute for the research grant on disaster storytelling. We also would like to express our gratitude to the Kobe Machizukuri Rokko Island Fund Charitable Trust (Tokyo, Japan) and AIG Institute (Osaka, Japan) for financial contributions that supported the publication of the issue.

: pp. 127-134
Why Does Disaster Storytelling Matter for a Resilient Society?
Abstract
Shingo Nagamatsu, Yoshinobu Fukasawa, and Ikuo Kobayashi
: pp. 135-140
The Role of Museums in Telling Live Lessons
Abstract
Yuichi Ono, Marlene Murray, Makoto Sakamoto, Hiroshi Sato, Pornthum Thumwimol, Vipakorn Thumwimol, and Ratchaneekorn Thongthip
: pp. 141-145
Disaster Storytelling and Volcanic Eruptions Caused by Debris Avalanches on Mt. Bandai in Aizu and Mt. Unzendake and Mt. Mayuyama in Shimabara
Abstract
Hiroshi Sato and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 146-156
Disaster Museums in Japan: Telling the Stories of Disasters Before and After 3.11
Abstract
Elizabeth Maly and Mariko Yamazaki
: pp. 157-162
Disaster Tourism as a Tool for Disaster Story Telling
Abstract
Naoto Tanaka, Ikaptra, Satoru Kusano, Mariko Yamazaki, and Kazuo Matsumoto
: pp. 163-169
Transferring Historical Disaster Memories: The 1925 North Tajima Earthquake
Abstract
Mayumi Sakamoto
: pp. 170-175
Geotourism and Disaster Storytelling: Lessons from 2013 Izu-Oshima Island Debris Flow Disaster
Abstract
Kana Nishitani, Kazuyuki Nakagawa, and Shingo Nagamatsu
: pp. 176-181
The Role of the “Mediator” in Sustainable Preservation and Utilization of Disaster Remains – Report from the 2020 International Forum on Telling Live Lessons from Disasters –
Abstract
Ryoga Ishihara and Isao Hayashi
: pp. 182-193
Memories and Conflicts of Disaster Victims: Why They Wish to Dismantle Disaster Remains
Abstract
Nao Sakaguchi
: pp. 194-200
Role of Heritage Activism in Post-Disaster Reconstruction
Abstract
Sanjaya Uprety and Barsha Shrestha
: pp. 201-209
Challenges in the Preservation of Disaster Remains – Example of the Chelungpu Fault Preservation Park
Abstract
Cheng-Shing Chiang, Tyan-Ming Chu, Wen-Hao Chou, Shin-Ho Lee, and Jer-Fu Wang
: pp. 210-215
Documentary Film ‘Survivor’ Preserved as a Disaster Record
Abstract
Shiti Maghfira and Anna Matsukawa
: pp. 216-223
Learning from the Training for the Successors and Storytellers the Legacy of Atomic Bombing in Hiroshima City: Lessons for Disaster Storytellers
Abstract
Shosuke Sato and Masahiro Iwasaki
: pp. 224-227
International Post-Disaster Cooperation Toward Recovery and Keeping Memories Alive –Exploring Their Close Relationship–
Abstract
Masaru Sakato
: pp. 228-233
Disaster Storytelling: Extending the Memory of the Community Toward Disaster Preparedness from Myth, Scientific Explanation, and Popular Culture
Abstract
Eko Prawoto and Linda Octavia
: pp. 234-240
Strengthening Disaster Response and Resilience in Lao PDR – A Decade of Learning Since Typhoon Ketsana
Abstract
Dina Vivona and Manivanh Suyavong
: pp. 241-243
Role of Oral Transmission in Disaster Prevention Education – Significance of Disaster Folklore in Modern Times –
Abstract
Manabu Fujii, Erina Tamano, and Kazuya Hattori
: pp. 244-249
Education for Disaster Risk Reduction in Hyogo to Be Handed Down Through Generations
Abstract
Yasuhito Kawata, Kensuke Takenouchi, and Katsuya Yamori
: pp. 250-262
Making Evacuation Routine Behavior: Impact of Experiencing Severe Flood Damage on Recognition and Advance Evacuation Behavior
Abstract
Masato Tanaka and Minori Shimomura
: pp. 263-273
Evaluation of Listeners Reaction on the Storytelling of Disaster Response Experience: The Case of Service Continuity at Miyagi Prefectural Office After Experiencing the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Shosuke Sato and Fumihiko Imamura

Regular Papers

: pp. 275-286
Developing an Automated System for Simple Estimation of the Direct Damage Amounts from Earthquakes
Abstract
Masaki Ikeda, Qinglin Cui, Toshihisa Toyoda, Hiromitsu Nakamura, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 287-297
Study Concept on the Development of an Urban Cyber Physical System for Enhancing the Capability to Respond to Large-Scale Earthquakes
Abstract
Toshihiko Horiuchi, Koichi Kajiwara, Takuzo Yamashita, Takashi Aoki, Tomonari Yashiro, Yoshihide Sekimoto, Mikio Koshihara, and Hideki Koizumi
: p. 298
Erratum for “Verbal Expressions of Risk Communication: A Case Study After the 3.11 Crisis” (Vol.9, pp. 644-652, 2014)
Abstract
Shinichiro Okamoto and Toshiko Kikkawa

No.1

(Jan)

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics

Special Issue on COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics

: p. 5
COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics
Sumio Shinoda, Hideaki Karaki, and Haruo Hayashi

COVID-2019 was first identified in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019, and from there it spread worldwide. Due to this worldwide distribution of COVID-19 cases, the WHO declared a COVID-19 pandemic. The pathogen of COVID-19, a novel corona virus, resembles SARS-CoV, the pathogen of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome, a pandemic in 2003), so the International Committee on Taxonomy Virology named it SARS-CoV-2. However, COVID-19 is a different disease from SARS, and should be controlled to the extent possible with the effective vaccines and therapeutic medicines.

Although one year has passed since the first appearance of the disease, the number of COVID-19 cases continues to increase, and the pandemic is now in its third large wave. It is thought that it will be difficult to eradicate the disease completely, because SARS-CoV-2 is possible to invade and live in various host animals in addition to humans.

During this pandemic, the JDR has put together the special issue “COVID-19 and Historical Pandemics.” Because there have been many pandemics that have transformed society in various ways, the special issue includes historical pandemics in addition to COVID-19. The manuscripts in this issue include various subjects related to COVID-19, including methods of analyzing the pandemic, suggestions for countermeasures against it, methods of prevention and epidemiological reviews, among others.

The WHO has released a large volume of pandemic information on an ongoing basis, including its “COVID-19 Weekly Epidemiological Update.” In the weekly edition of December 27, it reported the cumulative number of cases and percentages of the global total from around the world: the Americas 34,403,371 (43%), Europe 25,271 (31%), Africa 1,831,227 (2%), and the Western Pacific 1.059,751 (1%). It is notable that 74% of cumulative global total number of cases have been reported in the Americas and Europe, where most developed countries are included, whereas the numbers in Africa, which includes many developing countries, and the Western Pacific region, which includes Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Malaysia in addition to Japan and China, are 2% and 1%, respectively. This indicates that the COVID-19 pandemic is a different from previous epidemics caused by other infectious diseases.

As the pandemic spreads, the JDR plans to edit Part 2 of this COVID-19 special issue.

: pp. 6-11
COVID-19 Outbreak Forecasting and Effects of Self-Restraint Against Excursions in Tokyo, Japan, as of the End of March, 2020, Before the Emergency Declaration on April 7, 2020
Abstract
Yoshiyuki Sugishita, Junko Kurita, Tamie Sugawara, and Yasushi Ohkusa
: pp. 12-15
An Analysis of the COVID-19 Epidemic in Japan Using a Logistic Model
Abstract
Kuniaki Miyamoto
: pp. 16-23
OxCGRT-Based Evaluation of Anti-COVID-19 Measures Taken by Japanese Prefectures
Abstract
Shinya Kumagai, Tomomi Aoyama, Eri Ino, and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 24-30
Twitter Sentiment Analysis of Bangkok Tourism During COVID-19 Pandemic Using Support Vector Machine Algorithm
Abstract
Thanapat Sontayasara, Sirawit Jariyapongpaiboon, Arnon Promjun, Napat Seelpipat, Kumpol Saengtabtim, Jing Tang, and Natt Leelawat
: pp. 31-39
Study of New Normal Business Continuity to Improve Resilience Against Uncertain Threat
Abstract
Hideki Goromaru, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yoshihisa Ueda, and Sumiko Fukaya
: pp. 40-47
A Study of Issues Related to the Operation of Evacuation Shelters in a Corona-Endemic Society – Through the Guidelines and Training of Shiga Prefecture in Japan
Abstract
Seiko Takaoka, Yasuhito Kawata, and Tatsuro Kai
: pp. 48-55
Social Media: New Trends in Emergency Information
Abstract
Changchun Feng, Kabilijiang Umaier, Takaaki Kato, and Qiushan Li
: pp. 56-60
The Impact of COVID-19 on the Global Supply Chain: A Discussion on Decentralization of the Supply Chain and Ensuring Interoperability
Abstract
Eri Ino and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 61-69
Prevention of COVID-19 Infection with Personal Protective Equipment
Abstract
Noriko Shimasaki and Hideaki Morikawa
: pp. 70-83
Characteristic Features of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic: Attention to the Management and Control in Egypt
Abstract
Nourhan H. El-Subbagh, Rana Rabie, Aya A. Mahfouz, Khaled M. Aboelsuod, Mohamed Y. Elshabrawy, Haneen M. Abdelaleem, Basant E. Elhammady, Weam Abosaleh, Lamiaa A. Salama, Sara Badreldeen, Mohamed Yasser, and Abdelaziz Elgaml
: pp. 84-87
The Novel Coronavirus Pandemic and the State of the Epidemic in Kobe, Japan
Abstract
Noriko Nakanishi and Yoshio Iijima
: pp. 88-96
Air Pollutants During COVID-19 Lockdown Period in India
Abstract
Vignesh K. S. and Padma Venkatasubramanian
: pp. 97-109
Epidemiology of the Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Several Remarkable Pandemics
Abstract
Sumio Shinoda
: pp. 110-117
A Re-Look at Cholera Pandemics from Early Times to Now in the Current Era of Epidemiology
Abstract
Thandavarayan Ramamurthy and Amit Ghosh

Vol.15 (2020)

No.7

(Dec)

The Sixth JDR Award
Special Issue on the Second World Bosai Forum
Mini Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 3

The Sixth JDR Award

: p. 815
Congratulations! The Sixth JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi

The Sixth JDR Award ceremony was held online due to COVID-19 on October 6, 2020 and a prize were given to Professor Masato Iguchi, Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI), Kyoto University, Japan. We congratulate the winner and sincerely wish for future success.

: p. 816
Presenting the Sixth JDR Award
Setsuya Nakada

It is our great pleasures to present the sixth JDR Award to Prof. Masato Iguchi. Prof. Iguchi, as the top guest editor, published two JDR special issues entitled “Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal disasters caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products.” These special issues, vol.11, no.1 in 2016 and vol.14, no.1 in 2019, were results of a project (2013–2018) of the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS). The second special issue set a record for the highest annual download. In addition, he was the first author or co-author of 11 papers published by JDR in 2019.

Professor Iguchi, as one of most recognized volcanologists in the world, has been leading observation research of active volcanoes as the Director of the Sakurajima Volcano Research Center of Kyoto University’s Disaster Prevention Research Institute. He has promoted geophysical research on volcanic activity not only in Japan but also in Indonesia, evaluating volcanic activity by incorporating the results of material science and demonstrating the effectiveness of long-term, multi-item observations in those processes. He has made a significant contribution to the promotion of Indonesian volcano research, taking over the strong will of former Kyoto University professors, and his contributions have culminated in the aforementioned two special issues.

On behalf of the JDR editorial board, I wish to thank Prof. Iguchi for his efforts and to congratulate him as the winner of the sixth JDR Award.

: p. 817
Message from the Winner
Masato Iguchi

A volcanic eruption is a phenomenon in which ballistic bombs, lapilli, volcanic ash, lava, and gas are discharged. Volcanic ash and gas are carried by the wind, and pyroclastic flows and lava flows are carried away by the force of gravity. These cause disasters of various forms in the areas around volcanoes, sometimes far from eruptive center. Accordingly, volcanic countries, particularly Asian countries such as Japan, Indonesia, and the Philippines, have been the scenes of volcanic disasters. We conducted the research project “Integrated study on mitigation of multimodal disasters caused by the ejection of volcanic products” with the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation and other institutes in Indonesia under the SATREPS project from FY2013 to 2018. The aim of the project was to advance volcanic hazard mitigation, and I served as the guest editor of “Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products” (2016) and “Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products: Part 2” (2019) of the Journal of Disaster Research. The articles in the Special Issues have been downloaded by many researchers. The Special Issues cover many topics related to volcanic disasters, but the main theme is how to forecast real-time volcanic hazards using data monitoring, since it is this monitoring that triggers the issuing of warnings.

I have studied the volcanic activity of Sakurajima, the most active volcano in Japan, for 40 years, primarily to forecast its eruptions. Forecasting the eruptions is not as important as forecasting the hazards and risks posed by volcanic actions. Research done on the mitigation of the volcanic hazards of Sakurajima as well as Indonesian volcanoes has been enhanced by interaction. The cumulative volume of magma stored in the past 100 years indicates that Sakurajima has the potential for a large-scale eruption (VEI > 4). An eruption and its dispersal of volcanic ash in particular would cause a variety of disasters over a wide area, as described in the other issues of Journal of Disaster Research. I hope that the research results will be utilized for hazard mitigation in the event of future large-scale eruptions. The research could be advanced through collaboration with studies aimed at the enhancement of resilience and recovery.

Special Issue on the Second World Bosai Forum

: p. 821
the Second World Bosai Forum
Yuichi Ono, Anawat Suppasri, Elizabeth Maly, and Daisuke Sasaki

The World Bosai Forum/International Disaster Risk Conference@Sendai 2019 (WBF2019) held in November 2019 in Sendai City, Japan, was successful in bringing together actors from multiple sectors to advance the goals of disaster risk reduction (DRR). We would like to take this opportunity to express our heartfelt gratitude to all those who participated in the sessions, exhibitions, poster sessions, and mini-presentations, as well as to the many local people who came to the event.

According to the World Bosai Forum [1], 871 participants from 38 countries attended the WBF2019 which included 50 oral sessions, 3 keynote speeches, 47 poster sessions, 33 mini-presentations, and 14 exhibition booths, which contributed to deepening the discussion and promotion of the “Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, 2015–2030” (SFDRR) and in particular progress towards the achievement of Global Target E, to substantially increase the number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020. Including lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, local knowledge and solutions towards advancing BOSAI were actively shared and discussed among the participants who joined this global forum, from various organizations and sectors. In particular, there were many sessions in which young people and private companies played a key role.

The guest editors are pleased to publish this special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research, which is comprised of 13 articles sharing the research advancements presented at the WBF2019. We hope that this special issue on the WBF2019 will contribute to the literature on disaster science and further advances in disaster risk reduction.

: pp. 822-832
Statistical Analysis of Building Damage from the 2013 Super Typhoon Haiyan and its Storm Surge in the Philippines
Abstract
Tanaporn Chaivutitorn, Thawalrat Tanasakcharoen, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, Carl Vincent C. Caro, Alfredo Mahar Francisco A. Lagmay, Anawat Suppasri, Jeremy D. Bricker, Volker Roeber, Carine J. Yi, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 833-844
Social, Economic and Health Effects of the 2016 Alberta Wildfires: Pediatric Resilience
Abstract
Julie L. Drolet, Caroline McDonald-Harker, Nasreen Lalani, Meagan McNichol, Matthew R. G. Brown, and Peter H. Silverstone
: pp. 845-854
Learning from a Post-Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda Recovery Institution (OPARR): A New Research Agenda for Recovery Governance
Abstract
Kanako Iuchi, Yasuhito Jibiki, and Beth Tamayose
: pp. 855-867
Consideration of the World BOSAI Forum/IDRC 2017 and the World BOSAI Forum/IDRC 2019 in Sendai Through a Comparison of the Two Forums
Abstract
Kanayo Kousaka
: pp. 868-877
Transdisciplinary Approach for Building Societal Resilience to Disasters – Interpreting the Processes of Creating New Knowledge in the Context of Knowledge Management –
Abstract
Senro Kuraoka, Youb Raj Paudyal, and Khamarrul Azahari Razak
: pp. 878-889
Towards a Comparative Framework of Adaptive Planning and Anticipatory Action Regimes in Chile, Japan, and the US: An Exploration of Multiple Contexts Informing Tsunami Risk-Based Planning and Relocation
Abstract
Naoko Kuriyama, Elizabeth Maly, Jorge León, Daniel Abramson, Lan T. Nguyen, and Ann Bostrom
: pp. 890-899
Advances of International Collaboration on M9 Disaster Science: Scientific Session Report
Abstract
Elizabeth Maly, Kenjiro Terada, Randall J. LeVeque, Naoko Kuriyama, Daniel B. Abramson, Lan T. Nguyen, Ann Bostrom, Jorge León, Michael Motley, Patricio A. Catalan, Shunichi Koshimura, Shuji Moriguchi, Yuya Yamaguchi, Carrie Garrison-Laney, Anawat Suppasri, and Erick Mas
: pp. 900-912
WBF-2019 Core Research Cluster of Disaster Science Planning Session as Disaster Preparedness: Participation in a Training Program for Conductor-Type Disaster Healthcare Personnel
Abstract
Junko Okuyama, Hiroyuki Sasaki, Shuji Seto, Yu Fukuda, Toshiki Iwasaki, Toru Matsuzawa, Kiyoshi Ito, Takako Izumi, Hiroki Takakura, Fumihiko Imamura, and Tadashi Ishi
: pp. 913-918
Recent Progress Achieved by the Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS)
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 919-930
Sustainable Community Development for Disaster Resilience Using the Fukuzumi-Machi Method and Human Resources Development for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Takeshi Sato, Aiko Sakurai, Yuki Sadaike, Yukiko Ouchi, and Yasuo Sugawara
: pp. 931-942
Sustainable Community Development for Disaster Resilience and Human Resources Development for Disaster Risk Reduction – Growth and Community Contribution of the Katahira Children’s Board for Community Development –
Abstract
Takeshi Sato, Aiko Sakurai, Yuki Sadaike, Risa Yanagiya, and Hitoshi Konno
: pp. 943-958
Spatial Distribution of Causes of Death in the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami at Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture
Abstract
Tomoki Serikawa, Shuji Seto, Anawat Suppasri, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 959-968
Study of Reflections on University Fieldwork Courses: The Characteristics of Learning Content of Students Who Visited Disaster-Affected Areas
Abstract
Yu Takahashi, Shun Nakazawa, and Hideyuki Sasaki

Mini Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 3

: p. 969
the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 3
Yuichi Ono, Daisuke Sasaki, and Anawat Suppasri

The Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS) at the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) at Tohoku University was established in April 2015 to support the monitoring of the global targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 (SFDRR). The GCDS, in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), is to provide support for National Disaster Management Offices (NDMOs) to build capacity in developing national disaster loss and damage statistics, an essential tool used in monitoring and policy making for the reduction of disaster risk. Since its establishment, the GCDS has been contributing to the implementation of the SFDRR.

In 2019, the GCDS participated in the Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments (SFVCs), launched by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR). Although the information regarding the activities of the GCDS is described in detail in the first Synthesis and Analysis Report of the SFVC [1], one of the activities committed to in its SFVC is to publish special issues of the Journal of Disaster Research as a contribution to the development of disaster statistics. The guest editors are pleased to publish the third special issue, which contains valuable academic articles closely related to the activities of the GCDS.

We hope that this special issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics makes a significant contribution to the literature on disaster statistics and accelerates its development.

: pp. 970-974
Measurement of Disaster Damage Utilizing Disaster Statistics: A Case Study Analyzing the Data of Indonesia
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki, Makoto Okumura, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 975-980
Implementation of Post Disaster Needs Assessment in Indonesia: Literature Review
Abstract
Yasuhito Jibiki, Dicky Pelupessy, Daisuke Sasaki, and Kanako Iuchi
: pp. 981-990
Case Reasoning-Based Emergency Decision Making for Oil and Gas Accidents
Abstract
Ruifang La, Zaixu Zhang, and Pengfei Bai
: pp. 991-1010
Effects of Radioactive Contamination from the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site on Behavior Related to Food Choices: A Case Study of Kazakhstan
Abstract
Tetsuya Nakamura, Satoru Masuda, Akifumi Kuchiki, and Atsushi Maruyama

Regular Papers

: pp. 1011-1024
The Determinants of Residents’ Evacuation Behavior in the Torrential Rain in Western Japan in 2018: Examination of Survey Data of Victims in Okayama Prefecture
Abstract
Shoji Ohtomo, Reo Kimura, Yoshiaki Kawata, and Keiko Tamura
: pp. 1025-1039
Assessing Flood Risk of the Chao Phraya River Basin Based on Statistical Rainfall Analysis
Abstract
Shakti P. C., Mamoru Miyamoto, Ryohei Misumi, Yousuke Nakamura, Anurak Sriariyawat, Supattra Visessri, and Daiki Kakinuma

No.6

(Oct)

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020

: p. 675
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020
Haruo Hayashi and Ryohei Misumi

We are very pleased to publish the Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2020. There are nine papers in this issue.

The first two papers concern hazard and risk information systems: Sano et al. constructed a real-time risk information map for flood and landslide disasters, and Hirashima et al. created an alert system for snow removal from rooftops. These systems are already in use on the NIED website. The next three papers are case studies of recent storm disasters in Japan and the United States: Cui et al. analyzed the time variation in the distribution of damage reports in the headquarters for heavy-rainfall disaster control in Fukuoka, Shakti et al. studied flood disasters caused by Typhoon Hagibis (2019), and Iizuka and Sakai conducted a meteorological analysis of Hurricane Harvey (2017). Regarding volcanic disasters, Tanada and Nakamura reported the results of an electromagnetic survey of Mt. Nasudake.

This special issue also includes three papers on large-scale model experimentation: Danjo and Ishizawa studied the rainfall infiltration process using NIED’s Large-Scale Rainfall Simulator, Kawamata and Nakazawa conducted experiments concerning liquefaction, and Nakazawa et al. reported the results of experiments on seismic retrofits for road embankments. The experiments used E-Defense, the world’s largest three-dimensional shaking table.

We hope this issue will provide useful information for all readers studying natural disasters.

: pp. 676-687
Generation of Risk Information Based on Comprehensive Real-Time Analysis of Flooding and Landslide Disaster Occurrence Hazard and Social Vulnerability
Abstract
Hiroaki Sano, Yuichiro Usuda, Ichiro Iwai, Hitoshi Taguchi, Ryohei Misumi, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 688-697
Development of a Snow Load Alert System, “YukioroSignal” for Aiding Roof Snow Removal Decisions in Snowy Areas in Japan
Abstract
Hiroyuki Hirashima, Tsutomu Iyobe, Katsuhisa Kawashima, and Hiroaki Sano
: pp. 698-711
Time Series Analysis on the Damage Report of the Northern Kyushu Heavy Rainfall in July 2017
Abstract
Qinglin Cui, Makoto Hanashima, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 712-725
Flood Inundation Mapping of the Hitachi Region in the Kuji River Basin, Japan, During the October 11–13, 2019 Extreme Rain Event
Abstract
Shakti P. C., Kohin Hirano, and Satoshi Iizuka
: pp. 726-734
What Factors Contributed to the Torrential Rainfall of Hurricane Harvey over Texas?
Abstract
Satoshi Iizuka and Naoki Sakai
: pp. 735-744
Subsurface Resistivity Imaging of Nasudake (Chausudake) Volcano Determined from Time Domain Electromagnetic Survey (TDEM)
Abstract
Toshikazu Tanada and Yoichi Nakamura
: pp. 745-753
Quantitative Evaluation of the Relationship Between Slope Gradient and Infiltration Capacity Based on a Rainfall Experiment Using Pit Sand
Abstract
Toru Danjo and Tomohiro Ishizawa
: pp. 754-764
Influences on Liquefaction-Induced Damage of Pore Water Seepage into an Unsaturated Surface Layer
Abstract
Yohsuke Kawamata and Hiroshi Nakazawa
: pp. 765-781
Full-Scale Experiment of Earthquake Resistant Embankment Using Flexible Container Bag
Abstract
Hiroshi Nakazawa, Yohsuke Kawamata, Satoru Shibuya, Shoji Kato, Kyung-Beom Jeong, Jemin Baek, Tara Nidhi Lohani, Akihira Morita, Osamu Takemoto, and Yoshitaka Moriguchi

Regular Papers

: pp. 783-793
Action Research on Bosai Map Cycle –Communications and Interactions Among Stakeholders Involved in Mapmaking Activities–
Abstract
Natsumi Okada and Katsuya Yamori
: pp. 794-801
Consideration of Evacuation Drills Utilizing the Capabilities of People with Special Needs
Abstract
Takashi Sugiyama and Katsuya Yamori

No.5

(Aug)

Special Issue on SATREPS Area-BCM

Special Issue on SATREPS Area-BCM

: p. 545
SATREPS Area-BCM
Kenji Watanabe

This special issue summarizes the main results of the first two years of the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) project, which is supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). SATREPS has provided excellent opportunities for our joint research team from Thailand and Japan to work in close coordination on challenging multidisciplinary issues.

The Area-BCM for the Enhancement of Resilience of Industrial Complexes in Thailand project was started in 2018. Its scope includes the impacts of urban flooding disasters in Bangkok and its surrounding areas where socio-economic functionalities have been concentrated, as well as chain repercussions of disaster impacts, spread through global supply chains, in important production and logistics facilities in Thailand. Our high-level project targets are based on the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) 2015–2030 as well as Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially #11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities), #8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth), and #13 (Climate Action).

This issue contains interim research results from our project mainly led by members from Thailand with regional aspects of our project site. However, we plan to release another special issue by the end of our project that will include more generalized concepts and frameworks that can be applicable to other regions or countries, including Japan.

As we take a multidisciplinary approach that includes science and technology, life and well-being science, and social science, our main objective in featuring this special issue is to make our interim research results known to other researchers and practitioners in related fields. We do this in order to get opinions and suggestions from different perspectives so that these may be reflected in the directions our research takes during the remainder of our project term.

Finally, I am truly grateful for the authors’ insightful contributions and the referees’ acute professional suggestions, which together make this JDR special issue a valuable contribution to making our society more resilient to future disasters.

: pp. 546-555
Business Continuity Management: A Preliminary Systematic Literature Review Based on ScienceDirect Database
Abstract
Kananut Charoenthammachoke, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, and Akira Kodaka
: pp. 556-570
Finding the Devastating Economic Disaster’s Root Causes of the 2011 Flood in Thailand: Why Did Supply Chains Make the Disaster Worse?
Abstract
Tadashi Nakasu, Mamoru Miyamoto, Ruttiya Bhula-or, Tartat Mokkhamakkul, Sutee Anantsuksomsri, Yot Amornkitvikai, Sutpratana Duangkaew, and Toshio Okazumi
: pp. 571-578
Assessment of Natural Disaster Coping Capacity from Social Capital Perspectives: A Case Study of Bangkok
Abstract
Sutee Anantsuksomsri and Nij Tontisirin
: pp. 579-587
Flood Management in the Context of Climate and Land-Use Changes and Adaptation Within the Chao Phraya River Basin
Abstract
Supattra Visessri and Chaiwat Ekkawatpanit
: pp. 588-598
A Stakeholder Analysis Approach for Area Business Continuity Management: A Systematic Review
Abstract
Sansanee Sapapthai, Natt Leelawat, Jing Tang, Akira Kodaka, Chatpan Chintanapakdee, Eri Ino, and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 599-608
Households’ Evacuation Decisions in Response to the 2011 Flood in Thailand
Abstract
Ruttiya Bhula-or, Tadashi Nakasu, Tartat Mokkhamakkul, Sutee Anantsuksomsri, Yot Amornkitvikai, Kullachart Prathumchai, and Sutpratana Duangkaew
: pp. 609-620
Flood Disaster Risk Reduction for Urban Collective Housing in Thailand
Abstract
Yukiko Tahira and Akiyuki Kawasaki
: pp. 621-631
Understanding Households’ Perceptions of Risk Communication During a Natural Disaster: A Case Study of the 2011 Flood in Thailand
Abstract
Kullachart Prathumchai and Ruttiya Bhula-or

Regular Papers

: pp. 633-644
Estimating the Nankai Trough Megathrust Earthquake’s Anticipated Fiscal Impact on Japanese Governments
Abstract
Takeshi Miyazaki and Shingo Nagamatsu
: pp. 645-654
Repeating Earthquakes Along the Colombian Subduction Zone
Abstract
Juan Carlos Bermúdez-Barrios and Hiroyuki Kumagai
: pp. 655-663
Emergency Broadcasting Radio in Indonesia: Comparative Studies in Lombok and Palu
Abstract
Ressi Dwiana, Ade Armando, and Mario Antonius Birowo

No.4

(Jun)

Regular papers

No.3

(Mar)

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project Part 2: Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project Part 2: Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar

: p. 241
SATREPS Myanmar Project Part 2: Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar
Kimiro Meguro and Yudai Honma

This special issue summarizes the main results of the latter half of a five-year project called SATREPS (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development) supported by Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). The project title is “Development of a Comprehensive Disaster Resilience System and Collaboration Platform in Myanmar” and it is the first SATREPS project adopted in Myanmar. Yangon Technological University (YTU) is a major counterpart organization and both national and local governmental organizations are working together as strategic partners.

In the first half of the project, a database was constructed, composed of important data for assessing urban safety and disaster risk, such as the ground properties, and distribution of buildings, people, and traffic. Using the database, city development model and evaluation models for flood and earthquake risks were developed.

In the latter half of the project, combining these two evaluation models, a system was developed for discussing future damage differences due to different urban plans and countermeasures. Furthermore, regarding flood, near-real-time flood inundation simulation system was developed. Related to earthquake disaster, a support system was developed for implementation of efficient countermeasures for both pre- and post-disaster. For infrastructure maintenance, performance monitoring and maintenance methods were proposed. Finally, in order to continue research activities and promote a continuous utilization of project results, a consortium scheme in which industry, government, and academia can work together has been created.

We hope that our SATREPS project activities can contribute to proper urban development and improvement of disaster management issues not only in Myanmar but also in other Asian countries.

: pp. 242-255
Development of Flood Damage Estimation Model for Agriculture – Case Study in the Bago Floodplain, Myanmar
Abstract
Shelly Win, Win Win Zin, and Akiyuki Kawasaki
: pp. 256-266
Characteristics of the 2018 Bago River Flood of Myanmar
Abstract
Daisuke Komori, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Nanami Sakai, Natsumi Shimomura, Akira Harada, Kohei Okuda, Chit Bo Bo Win, Aye Myat Thu, Khin Yadanar Tun, Wai Toe, and Win Win Zin
: pp. 267-276
Estimation of Run-of-River Hydropower Potential in the Myitnge River Basin
Abstract
Kyu Kyu Thin, Win Win Zin, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Abdul Moiz, and Seemanta Sharma Bhagabati
: pp. 277-287
Developing Flood Inundation Map Using RRI and SOBEK Models: A Case Study of the Bago River Basin, Myanmar
Abstract
Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Ralph Allen Acierto, and Tin Zar Oo
: pp. 288-299
Impact of Bias-Correction Methods in Assessing the Potential Flood Frequency Change in the Bago River
Abstract
Ralph Allen E. Acierto, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Win Win Zin
: pp. 300-311
Multivariate Flood Loss Estimation of the 2018 Bago Flood in Myanmar
Abstract
Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Georg Hörmann, Ralph Allen Acierto, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, and Aye Myat Thu
: pp. 312-323
User Stories-Based Requirement Elicitation for Data Visualization to Support Decision Making in Water Resource Management at Bago River Basin
Abstract
Akira Kodaka, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Naruhiko Shirai, Ralph Allen Acierto, Win Win Zin, and Naohiko Kohtake
: pp. 324-334
Projecting the Impact of Climate Change on Temperature, Precipitation, and Discharge in the Bago River Basin
Abstract
Hnin Thiri Myo, Win Win Zin, Kyi Pyar Shwe, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Ralph Allen Acierto
: pp. 335-343
Improving River Bathymetry and Topography Representation of a Low-Lying Flat River Basin by Integrating Multiple Sourced Datasets
Abstract
Seemanta Sharma Bhagabati, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Wataru Takeuchi, and Win Win Zin
: pp. 344-352
Application and Flood Discharge Analysis with Hydrological Model (WEB-DHM) in Bago River Basin
Abstract
Sann Win Maung, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Kyu Kyu Thin
: pp. 353-359
Condition Monitoring of Yangon Circular Railway and Yangon–Mandalay Railway Based on Car-Body Acceleration Response Using a Portable Device
Abstract
Hein Thura Aung, Kazuki Inoue, Sao Hone Pha, and Wataru Takeuchi
: pp. 360-367
Analysis of Seismic Performance of Suspension Bridge in Myanmar
Abstract
Punyawut Jiradilok, Kohei Nagai, Koji Matsumoto, Takeshi Yoshida, Tetsuro Goda, and Eiji Iwasaki
: pp. 368-376
Evaluating Expectations for Training Transfer: Exploratory Study on a Capacity Development Project for Road and Bridge Technology in Myanmar
Abstract
Michael Henry, Kohei Nagai, Koji Matsumoto, and Hiroshi Yokota
: pp. 377-386
Acquisition of Ground Information in Downtown Yangon for Bosai Operation Support System
Abstract
Tun Naing, Su Thinzar, Muneyoshi Numada, Khin Than Yu, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 387-406
Earthquake Building Collapse Risk Estimation for 2040 in Yangon, Myanmar
Abstract
Osamu Murao, Tomohiro Tanaka, Kimiro Meguro, and Theing Shwe
: pp. 407-415
Seismic Fragility Analysis of Poorly Built Timber Buildings in Yangon Slum Areas
Abstract
Khin Myat Kyaw, Chaitanya Krishna Gadagamma, Kyaw Kyaw, Hideomi Gokon, Osamu Murao, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 416-425
An Investigation of Socioeconomic and Land Use Influence on Car Ownership in Yangon City
Abstract
Thiri Aung, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
: pp. 426-436
Analysis of Bus Operation at Peak Hours Using Bus GPS Data: A Case Study of YBS-36
Abstract
Thet Htun Aung, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
: pp. 437-445
Analysis of Trip Distributions of Human Mobility Patterns and Their Transit Behaviors Using Mobile Call Detail Records
Abstract
Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
: pp. 446-450
Traffic Conditions and Route Choice of Road Users Between Two Roundabouts
Abstract
Lin Zarni Win, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
: pp. 451-460
Measuring Traffic Congestion Based on the Taxi Operations of Traditional and On-Demand Taxis in Yangon
Abstract
Moe Myint Mo, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto

No.2

(Mar)

Special Issue on Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program

Special Issue on Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program

: p. 69
Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program
Yuichiro Tanioka, Shingo Yoshida, Takao Ohminato, Aitaro Kato, and Noriko Kamaya

The Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program (2014–2018) carried out comprehensive research to mitigate disasters related to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The program selected multidisciplinary research in which earth scientists who study the processes of earthquake generation and volcanic eruptions, historians, archaeologists, human and social scientists, and engineers were all involved. The program aimed to collect pre-instrumental and pre-historical earthquake and volcanic data to understand earthquake and volcano disasters, to find risk evaluation techniques, and to evaluate disaster response and preparedness. Active collaborations between researchers from different science fields inspired new ideas and have driven various research in the program. New findings from the program have also created international collaborations and recognitions. Most of the results and new findings in the program have already been published in various internationally recognized journals and have greatly influenced scientific communities.

We believe that it is important to compile our findings from the last five years of the program and to publish the essence of our findings and published papers in this special issue. We hope that this special issue will be of value to researchers who are interested in multidisciplinary studies of mitigation of disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and related phenomena.

: pp. 70-75
Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program: An Overview
Abstract
Naoyuki Kato and Takeshi Nishimura
: pp. 76-86
Research on Pre-Modern Earthquakes Based on Fusion of Humanities and Sciences
Abstract
Masaharu Ebara, Akihito Nishiyama, Taisuke Murata, and Reiko Sugimori
: pp. 87-95
Main Results from the Program Promotion Panel for Subduction-Zone Earthquakes
Abstract
Kazushige Obara and Takuya Nishimura
: pp. 96-105
The Advancement of Research on Inland Earthquake Generation 2014–2018
Abstract
Satoshi Matsumoto, Tomomi Okada, Toshiko Terakawa, Makoto Uyeshima, and Yoshihisa Iio
: pp. 106-111
Five-Year Achievements of Volcano Program Promotion Panel
Abstract
Takahiro Ohkura and Kenji Nogami
: pp. 112-143
Evaluation of Phenomena Preceding Earthquakes and Earthquake Predictability
Abstract
Masao Nakatani
: pp. 144-151
Prior and Real-Time Estimations of Ground Motions, Tsunamis, and Other Geodynamic Hazards
Abstract
Takao Kagawa and Yusaku Ohta
: pp. 152-164
Research for Contributing to the Field of Disaster Science: A Review
Abstract
Reo Kimura, Hiroe Miyake, Keiko Tamura, Naoyuki Kato, Yuichi Morita, Masato Iguchi, Yuichiro Tanioka, Kazuki Koketsu, Yoshihiko Kuroda, Hiromitsu Oshima, and Kenji Satake
: pp. 165-173
General Research Group for the Nankai Trough Great Earthquake
Abstract
Takuo Shibutani
: pp. 174-186
Integrated Study on Forecasting Volcanic Hazards of Sakurajima Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Masato Iguchi, Haruhisa Nakamichi, and Takeshi Tameguri
: pp. 187-201
Core-to-Core Collaborative Research Between Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo and Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University During FY2014 to FY2018
Abstract
Shinichi Matsushima

Regular Papers

: pp. 203-211
Development of Automatic Analysis and Data Visualization System for Volcano Muography
Abstract
Hiroyuki K. M. Tanaka
: pp. 212-225
Questionnaire Survey on the Difficulty of Attending Work for Commuters After the 2018 Osaka Earthquake
Abstract
U Hiroi, Naoya Sekiya, Shuntarou Waragai, and Fusae Kukihara
: pp. 226-232
Trends of Measures in Disaster Recovery Plans: Focusing on the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Hiroaki Goto and U Hiroi

No.1

(Feb)

The Fifth JDR Award

The Fifth JDR Award

: p. 3
Congratulations! Journal of Disaster Research The Fifth JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
: p. 4
Presenting the Fifth JDR Award
Naoshi Hirata
: p. 5
Message from the Winner
Yuichiro Usuda

Regular Papers

: pp. 9-19
Evaluation of Seismic Vulnerability Indices for Low-Rise Reinforced Concrete Buildings Including Data from the 6 February 2016 Taiwan Earthquake
Abstract
Santiago Pujol, Lucas Laughery, Aishwarya Puranam, Pedram Hesam, Li-Hui Cheng, Alana Lund, and Ayhan Irfanoglu
: pp. 20-40
Developing a Disaster Management Education and Training Program for Children with Intellectual Disabilities to Improve “Zest for Life” in the Event of a Disaster – A Case Study on Tochigi Prefectural Imaichi Special School for the Intellectually Disabled –
Abstract
Toshimitsu Nagata and Reo Kimura
: pp. 41-52
A Study on Disaster Medical Response During the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Based on the Emergency Support Function – Nine Days at Iwate Prefecture from Hyperacute to Subacute Phase –
Abstract
Shinji Akitomi, Akira Koyama, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yuji Maeda, Reo Kimura, Keiko Tamura, Haruo Hayashi, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 53-56
Air-Fall Ash from the Main Crater of Asama Volcano on August 7, 2019, and its Water-Soluble Components
Abstract
Muga Yaguchi, Akihiko Terada, and Yasuo Ogawa

Vol.14 (2019)

Scientific Communication Online

No.9

(Dec)

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2019
Climate Change, Migration, and Vulnerability
Mini Special Issue on Establishment of Interdisciplinary Research Cluster of Disaster Science

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2019

: p. 1139
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2019
Haruo Hayashi and Eiichi Fukuyama

The National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED) is working on three tasks: predicting disasters, preventing damage, and realizing speedy reconstruction and recovery efforts in the event of natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, landslides, torrential rains, blizzards, and ice storms.

In the last three years of the NIED’s fourth mid/long term plan period, which began in 2016, natural disasters have occurred every year, including earthquake disasters such as the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (M7.3) and the 2018 Iburi, Hokkaido, earthquake (M7.1). Disasters of the rainfall include the heavy rainfall in the northern Kyushu (Fukuoka and Oita) in July 2017, the heavy rain event in southwestern Japan in July 2018, the rainfall in northern Kyushu (Saga) in August 2019, and the heavy rainfall in Kanto and Tohoku in October 2019. There were also other disasters: an avalanche accident on Nasudake in 2017 and a phreatic eruption of Kusatsu-Shiranesan in 2018.

Due to the above-mentioned very frequent occurrence of such natural disasters on the Japanese islands, our institute has conducted several research projects to mitigate the damage from such disasters and to accelerate the recovery from them. As the third NIED special issue in the Journal of Disaster Research, several related research results were presented such as those on seismic disasters (Wakai et al., Nakazawa et al., and Ohsumi et al.), those on climatic disasters (Nakamura, and Ishizawa and Danjo), and those of their integrated researches for disaster risk reduction (Cui et al. and Nakajima et al.).

Although the achievements detailed in these papers are the results of individual research, the NIED hopes that these results as a whole will be fully utilized to promote science and technology for disaster risk reduction and resilience. The NIED hopes that this special issue awakens the readers’ interest in new research and, of course, creates an opportunity for further collaborative works with us.

: pp. 1140-1153
Modeling of Subsurface Velocity Structures from Seismic Bedrock to Ground Surface in the Tokai Region, Japan, for Broadband Strong Ground Motion Prediction
Abstract
Atsushi Wakai, Shigeki Senna, Kaoru Jin, Atsushi Yatagai, Haruhiko Suzuki, Yoshiaki Inagaki, Hisanori Matsuyama, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 1154-1169
Problems in Earthquake Resistance Evaluation of Gabion Retaining Wall Based on Shake Table Test with Full-Scale Model
Abstract
Hiroshi Nakazawa, Kazuya Usukura, Tadashi Hara, Daisuke Suetsugu, Kentaro Kuribayashi, Tsuyoshi Nishi, Shun Kimura, and Shoji Shimomura
: pp. 1170-1184
An Attempt to Grasp the Disaster Situation of “The 2018 Hokkaido Eastern Iburi Earthquake” Using SNS Information
Abstract
Qinglin Cui, Makoto Hanashima, Hiroaki Sano, Masaki Ikeda, Nobuyuki Handa, Hitoshi Taguchi, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 1185-1200
Damage Related to the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake in and Around Kamaishi City – Beyond the Tsunami Disaster –
Abstract
Tsuneo Ohsumi, Yuji Dohi, and Hemanta Hazarika
: pp. 1201-1226
Implementation and Demonstration of a System for the Forecasting of Surface Avalanche Potential Caused by Snowfall from a Cyclone
Abstract
Kazuki Nakamura
: pp. 1227-1235
Rainfall Indices at Estimated Occurrence Times of Sediment Disasters Triggered by the July 2018 Heavy Rainfall
Abstract
Tomohiro Ishizawa and Toru Danjo
: pp. 1236-1244
How Users of a Smartphone Weather Application Are Influenced by Animated Announcements Conveying Rainfall Intensity and Electronic Gifts Promoting Rain Evacuation
Abstract
Hiroko Nakajima, Kan Shimazaki, Yang Ishigaki, Akiko Miyajima, Akira Kuriyama, Koyuru Iwanami, and Yasue Mitsukura

Climate Change, Migration, and Vulnerability

: p. 1245
Climate Change, Migration, and Vulnerability
Mikiyasu Nakayama, Scott Drinkall, and Daisuke Sasaki

As global sea levels continue to rise, atoll countries—facing persistent and imminent risk—are expected to become source nations of climate migrants in the foreseeable future. This special issue features 10 academic articles, which examine if residents in Pacific atoll countries were, are, or will be ready to re-establish their livelihoods after relocation.

The topic of migration is akin to a kaleidoscope, with continuously evolving shapes and colors, necessitating a broad spectrum of approaches across various disciplines. The authors of these articles thus examined the topic through mathematics, civil engineering, cultural and disaster studies, economics, education, geography, international relations, language, law, sociology and politics. The methodologies applied range from policy analysis to structural equation modeling.

Migration driven by climate change takes place gradually, even over a few decades. Unlike forced migration due to causes such as war and conflict, future climate migrants have the short-term advantage of time to ready themselves for displacement from their homeland. Preparation prior to relocation may include enhancing one’s language or vocational skills.

One of the focal points of this special issue is therefore the preparedness of migrants, both past and future. Case studies were carried out across Fiji, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, and the United States.

We also considered how migrants are received following resettlement, both in terms of legal instruments and assistance given by the public and private sectors. Case studies conducted in Austria and the United States address this aspect.

Yet another focus is to identify prevailing factors through which people develop their perceptions of climate change and its implications, for such perceptions are a driving force for migration. Case studies in Kiribati and the Marshall Islands contribute to this understanding.

We hope this special issue sharpens the vision of climate change and migration, and serves as a stepping stone for further research in the field.

: pp. 1246-1253
Climate Change, Migration, and Vulnerability: Overview of the Special Issue
Abstract
Mikiyasu Nakayama, Scott Drinkall, and Daisuke Sasaki
: pp. 1254-1261
Legal and Practical Measures for Environmental Migrants
Abstract
Sofia O’Connor, Carl Bruch, and Miko Maekawa
: pp. 1262-1266
Migration, Transition, and Livelihoods: A Comparative Analysis of Marshallese Pre- and Post-Migration to the United States
Abstract
Shanna N. McClain, Jennifer Seru, and Hermon Lajar
: pp. 1267-1276
Migration with Dignity: A Case Study on the Livelihood Transition of Micronesians to Portland and Salem, Oregon
Abstract
Scott Drinkall, Jackie Leung, Carl Bruch, Kapiolani Micky, and Sandi Wells
: pp. 1277-1286
Livelihood Re-Establishment of Emigrants from Kiribati in Fiji
Abstract
Miko Maekawa, Priyatma Singh, Dhrishna Charan, Nagisa Yoshioka, and Takuia Uakeia
: pp. 1287-1292
Higher Education and Destination of the Youth in the Republic of the Marshall Islands: Implication for Climate-Induced Migration
Abstract
Nagisa Yoshioka, Irene Taafaki, and Yolanda McKay
: pp. 1293-1296
Motivations for Students in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia to Emigrate Abroad
Abstract
Kanae Moriya
: pp. 1297-1302
Influence of Religion, Culture and Education on Perception of Climate Change, and its Implications
Abstract
Mikiyasu Nakayama, Irene Taafaki, Takuia Uakeia, Jennifer Seru, Yolanda McKay, and Hermon Lajar
: pp. 1303-1308
Influence of Religion, Culture and Education on Perception of Climate Change and its Implications: Applying Structural Equation Modeling (SEM)
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki, Irene Taafaki, Takuia Uakeia, Jennifer Seru, Yolanda McKay, and Hermon Lajar
: pp. 1309-1316
Addressing the Health Problems After Immigration Faced by the Marshallese in Springdale, Arkansas: Lessons Learned from the City of Vienna
Abstract
Ryo Fujikura, Mikiyasu Nakayama, Shanna N. McClain, and Scott Drinkall

Mini Special Issue on Establishment of Interdisciplinary Research Cluster of Disaster Science

: p. 1317
Establishment of Interdisciplinary Research Cluster of Disaster Science
Fumihiko Imamura

Since the start of the 21st century, major disasters, such as the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, have caused tremendous damage. The scope of the impact has spread across borders because global chains and the like have diversified. Consequently, disaster prevention and mitigation for reduction is now an important issue in the international community. To advance disaster reduction, it has been necessary to combine the humanities and social sciences with medical science and natural sciences as well, and Tohoku University has become the base of disaster prevention. What activities have begun, and for what purpose? I would like to find out and deepen my interest through this mini special feature.

The first part gives the background and objectives of the world’s top research cluster for disaster science. The second part presents survival study, or how to protect oneself from disasters such as tsunamis. Survival study is highly unique to this cluster. Reclassifying is proposed to compile the causes of death indicated by autopsy and systematizing deaths in the event of a disaster. Next, efforts in the humanities and social sciences to preserve the folk performing arts left in the community are presented. It has been pointed out that once local communities and connections are lost in disasters and its recovery faces more difficulty.

: pp. 1318-1322
A Platform for Multidisciplinary Research in Disaster Science Through Experiences from the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami
Abstract
Fumihiko Imamura, Hiroki Takakura, Toru Matsuzawa, and Kiyoshi Ito
: pp. 1323-1328
Challenge to Build the Science of Human Survival from Disaster Starting from Analysis for the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami
Abstract
Shuji Seto, Fumihiko Imamura, and Anawat Suppasri
: pp. 1329-1335
Three-Dimensional Measurement for Revitalization of Intangible Cultural Properties After Disasters
Abstract
Yu Fukuda

Regular Papers

: pp. 1337-1345
Spatial Characteristics of Flooded Areas in the Mun and Chi River Basins in Northeastern Thailand
Abstract
Shingo Zenkoji, Shigehiko Oda, Taichi Tebakari, and Boonlert Archevarahuprok
: pp. 1346-1352
Identifying Criteria for Designing Risk Communication System in Palu, Sulawesi, Indonesia
Abstract
Juhri Selamet
: pp. 1353-1354
Regarding Revoke of the Paper “A Distributed Autonomous Approach to Developing a Disaster Evacuation Assist System,” Published in the JDR
Abstract
Suminao Murakami and Haruo Hayashi

No.8

(Nov)

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2

: p. 1009
the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2
Yuichi Ono and Daisuke Sasaki

A year has passed since the first special issue on the development of disaster statistics was published in the Journal of Disaster Research. The Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS) at Tohoku University is steadily making progress as well. The GCDS now participates in Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments (SFVC), which was launched by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR). In addition, the GCDS has committed to publishing this special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research toward the development of disaster statistics. Needless to say, the publication of the special issue itself has a positive impact on accelerating research activity at the GCDS.

The guest editors are pleased to publish valuable academic articles that are closely related to the activities of the GCDS, thus contributing to the development of disaster statistics. In this second issue, there seem to be two main categories of research questions: “development of the existing disciplined-based research” and “analyzing various issues by means of questionnaire surveys.” Under the first category, by means of disaster statistics, two disciplines are covered: river engineering and international studies. The large number of studies based on questionnaire surveys act as an excellent reminder of the effectiveness of such a survey as a methodology for disaster statistics.

Last but not least, we hope that this second special issue on the development of disaster statistics will also contribute to the literature on disaster statistics and accelerate its development.

: pp. 1010-1013
Overview of the Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1014-1023
Quantifying Disaster Casualties Centered on Flooding in the Chikugo River Middle Basin in the Past 400 Years to Determine the Historical Context of the July 2017 Northern Kyushu Torrential Rainfall
Abstract
Jun Teramura and Yukihiro Shimatani
: pp. 1024-1029
Analysis of the Attitude Within Asia-Pacific Countries Towards Disaster Risk Reduction: Text Mining of the Official Statements of 2018 Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki
: pp. 1030-1046
Effects of Post-Disaster Aid Measures to Firms: Evidence from Tohoku University Earthquake Recovery Firm Survey 2012–2015
Abstract
Yuzuru Isoda, Satoru Masuda, and Shin-Ichi Nishiyama
: pp. 1047-1058
Analyzing the Association Between Disaster Risk Preparedness and Environmental Consciousness of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: The Case of Sukagawa City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan
Abstract
Naoko Kimura, Satoshi Hoshino, and Kenichiro Onitsuka
: pp. 1059-1065
Impression of the Reconstruction and Satisfaction with Life After the Great East Japan Earthquake: Tago Nishi’s Disaster Restoration Public Housing
Abstract
Shinya Tsukada and Tetsuo Morita
: pp. 1066-1071
Exploratory Analysis of the Relationship Between Livelihood Disruptions and Displacement Intentions Following a Volcanic Eruption: A Case from the 2014 Mt. Kelud Eruption
Abstract
Yasuhito Jibiki, Dicky Pelupessy, and Kanako Iuchi
: pp. 1072-1085
Recent Perceptions of Volcanic Hazard-Related Information in Japan: Expectation of Eruption Predictability and Acceptance of Uncertainty
Abstract
Miwa Kuri
: pp. 1086-1104
Citizen Satisfaction and Continuing Intentions Regarding Support and Compensation Prescribed by the Chernobyl Act: A Case Study of the Russian Central Federal District
Abstract
Tetsuya Nakamura, Satoru Masuda, Atsushi Maruyama, and Yuki Yano

Regular Papers

: pp. 1105-1114
General Review on Hog Cholera (Classical Swine Fever), African Swine Fever, and Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis Infection
Abstract
Sumio Shinoda, Tamaki Mizuno, and Shin-ichi Miyoshi
: pp. 1115-1126
Study on Disaster Medical Response During the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Based on Essential Elements of Information – Nine Days at Iwate Prefecture from Hyperacute Phase to Subacute Phase –
Abstract
Shinji Akitomi, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Naoko Kosaka, Yuji Maeda, Haruo Hayashi, Jun Murai, and Kimiro Meguro

No.7

(Oct)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: pp. 939-948
Drought Index for Peatland Wildfire Management in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia During El Niño Phenomenon
Abstract
Novitasari Novitasari, Joko Sujono, Sri Harto, Azwar Maas, and Rachmad Jayadi
: pp. 949-958
Stampede Events and Strategies for Crowd Management
Abstract
Chun-Hao Shao, Pei-Chun Shao, and Fang-Ming Kuo
: pp. 959-971
Disaster Emergency Response Plan of the Royal Thai Embassy in Tokyo, Japan: A Review
Abstract
Patcharavadee Thamarux, Anawat Suppasri, Natt Leelawat, Masashi Matsuoka, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 972-977
Time Variation in the Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Volcanic Gas at Mt. Mihara of Izu-Oshima Island, Japan
Abstract
Takeshi Ohba, Muga Yaguchi, Kana Nishino, and Nozomi Numanami
: pp. 978-990
A Discussion on the Nation’s Command and Coordination Regarding Emergency Fire Response Teams
Abstract
Tetsuo Murota and Fumio Takeda
: pp. 991-995
Constituent Mineral and Water-Soluble Components of Volcanic Ash from the 2018 Eruption of Mt. Motoshirane of Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Muga Yaguchi, Takeshi Ohba, Nozomi Numanami, and Ryohei Kawaguchi

No.6

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Western Japan Heavy Rain

Special Issue on the Western Japan Heavy Rain

: p. 873
the Western Japan Heavy Rain
Haruo Hayashi

In 2018, Japan not only had an abnormally hot summer, but also experienced successive disasters, including the Northern Osaka Earthquake, the Western Japan Heavy Rain, Typhoon No. 21, the Hokkaido Mid Iburi Earthquake, and Typhoon No. 24. In particular, the record-breaking heavy rains continued in a large area of Western Japan from June 28 to July 4, due to the storm front and Typhoon No. 7. The amount of rainfall totaled over 1,800 mm in the Shikoku Region and 1,200 mm in the Tokai Region. The quantity of rain that fell within 48 and 72 hours in both the Chugoku and Kinki Regions, as well as many other areas, was the highest rainfall ever recorded. A special warning regarding heavy rain was issued in 10 prefectures and every kind of disaster that Japan had experienced recently occurred in various locations. As of August 21, a report from Disaster Management Section, Cabinet Office indicated 221 deaths, 9 missing persons, 68 severely injured persons, 319 slightly injured persons, 3 persons with an unknown level of injury, 6,206 destroyed homes, 9,764 severely-damaged homes, 3,765 partially-destroyed homes, 9,006 homes with flooding above the first-floor level, and 20,086 houses with flooding below the first-floor level.

During this large-scale disaster, which was named the Western Japan Heavy Rain, the Disaster Relief Act was applied to 110 municipalities and JDR decided to issue a special edition to address issues pertinent to this specific disaster event. Paper submissions were requested that not only comprised demonstrative researches on hazard and damage characteristics, methods of evacuation, and features of disaster response, but also included introductions of best practices, which were conducted in various fields and prompted diverse collaboration to develop and establish measures to mediate the effect of the future Nankai Trough Earthquake, as well as problems and solutions to successfully realize diverse collaboration. In response to the call for papers for the special issue, nine researches were submitted and six were accepted following a strict review process. To address the category of hazard characteristics analyses, two papers analyzing the characteristics of the flooding resulting from the Western Japan Heavy Rain and one paper comprising an analysis of landslide disasters were accepted. In the category of disaster response, one paper focusing on the use of SNS and two papers regarding the elderly were accepted. It would be our sincere pleasure if this special issue could contribute to future reductions in damage resulting from natural disasters.

: pp. 874-885
Flooding Along Oda River Due to the Western Japan Heavy Rain in 2018
Abstract
Yasuo Nihei, Asataro Shinohara, Kaho Ohta, Shiro Maeno, Ryosuke Akoh, Yoshihisa Akamatsu, Takashi Komuro, Tomoya Kataoka, Shiho Onomura, and Ryo Kaneko
: pp. 886-893
Characteristics of Flood Flow with Active Sediment Transport in the Sozu River Flood Hazards at the Severe Rainfall Event in July 2018
Abstract
Daisuke Harada, Naoko Nagumo, Yousuke Nakamura, and Shinji Egashira
: pp. 894-902
Distribution and Characteristics of Slope Movements in the Southern Part of Hiroshima Prefecture Caused by the Heavy Rain in Western Japan in July 2018
Abstract
Hideaki Goto, Yasuhiro Kumahara, Shoichiro Uchiyama, Yoshiya Iwasa, Tomoru Yamanaka, Rinako Motoyoshi, Shun Takeuchi, Sho Murata, and Takashi Nakata
: pp. 903-911
An Analysis of Factors Influencing Disaster Mobility Using Location Data from Smartphones: Case Study of Western Japan Flooding
Abstract
Soohyun Joo, Takehiro Kashiyama, Yoshihide Sekimoto, and Toshikazu Seto
: pp. 912-921
Mortality by Age Group and Municipality in the July 2018 Torrential Rainfall
Abstract
Miho Ohara and Naoko Nagumo
: pp. 922-935
Evacuation Behavior of Facilities for the Elderly in the Heavy Rain of July 2018
Abstract
Junko Kanai and Susumu Nakano

No.5

(Aug)

Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 2

Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 2

: pp. 687-700
Tracing Volcanic Activity Chronology from a Multiparameter Dataset at Shinmoedake Volcano (Kirishima), Japan
Abstract
Taishi Yamada, Hideki Ueda, Toshiya Mori, and Toshikazu Tanada
: pp. 701-712
Muographic Observation of Density Variations in the Vicinity of Minami-Dake Crater of Sakurajima Volcano
Abstract
László Oláh, Hiroyuki K. M. Tanaka, Gergő Hamar, and Dezső Varga
: pp. 713-727
Database of Crustal Deformation Observed by SAR: Improving Atmospheric Delay Mitigation for Satellite SAR Interferometry and Developing L-Band Multi-Type Portable SAR
Abstract
Taku Ozawa, Yosuke Aoki, Satoshi Okuyama, Xiaowen Wang, Yousuke Miyagi, and Akira Nohmi
: pp. 728-743
Development of an Optical Multispectral Remote Sensing System for Measuring Volcanic Surface Phenomena – Promotion Project for Next Generation Volcano Research B2 (Subtopic 2-2)
Abstract
Tetsuya Jitsufuchi
: pp. 744-754
Installation of New GNSS Network Around Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan: Its Perspective and the First Result
Abstract
Rina Noguchi, Tatsuji Nishizawa, Wataru Kanda, Takahiro Ohkura, and Akihiko Terada
: pp. 755-765
Late Pleistocene–Holocene Volcaniclastic Ejecta Along the Southern Apron of the Esan Volcanic Complex, Japan
Abstract
Daisuke Miura, Ryuta Furukawa, and Ken-ichi Arai
: pp. 766-779
Comparative Petrological Studies of 1962 and 1988–1989 Eruptions of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan: A Case Study for Understanding the Relationship Between Eruption Style and Magma Processes
Abstract
Mitsuhiro Nakagawa, Akiko Matsumoto, Kyohei Kobayashi, and Keiji Wada
: pp. 780-785
Measurement of H2O Molecule and Hydroxyl Concentrations in Hydrous Rhyolitic Glass by UV–Vis–NIR Dispersive Microspectroscopy
Abstract
Takahiro Miwa
: pp. 786-797
Experimental High-Resolution Forecasting of Volcanic Ash Hazard at Sakurajima, Japan
Abstract
Alexandros Panagiotis Poulidis, Tetsuya Takemi, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 798-809
Integrated Monitoring of Volcanic Ash and Forecasting at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Masato Iguchi, Haruhisa Nakamichi, Hiroshi Tanaka, Yusaku Ohta, Atsushi Shimizu, and Daisuke Miki

Regular Papers

: pp. 811-828
X-MP Radar for Developing a Lahar Rainfall Threshold for the Merapi Volcano Using a Bayesian Approach
Abstract
Ratih Indri Hapsari, Satoru Oishi, Magfira Syarifuddin, Rosa Andrie Asmara, and Djoko Legono
: pp. 829-842
An Open Dialogue Approach to Volcano Disaster Resilience and Governance: Action Research in Japan in the Aftermath of the Mt. Ontake Eruption
Abstract
Hidenroi Nakamura, Koshun Yamaoka, Masae Horii, and Ryoichi Miyamae
: pp. 843-860
Study on the National Disaster Management Administration System Against Huge Disasters – A Discussion Based on the Initial and Emergency Responses to the Great East Japan Earthquake –
Abstract
Akira Kotaki and Fumio Takeda

No.4

(Jun)

The Fourth JDR Award
Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 1

The Fourth JDR Award

: p. 565
Congratulations! The Fourth JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
: p. 566
Presenting the Fourth JDR Award
Tomoyuki Takahashi
: p. 567
Message from the Winner
Nobuo Shuto

Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 1

: pp. 569-570
Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development
Yuichi Morita, Eisuke Fujita, Mitsuhiro Nakagawa, and Setsuya Nakada

The phreatic eruption of the Ontake volcano in 2014 reminded us that even moderately active volcanoes, most of which are tourist attractions in Japan, can sometimes exhibit unpredictable and hazardous behaviors, taking away the lives of those who do not fully recognize their threat. With this adding momentum, the Japanese people want volcanology and its applications to be developed to further improve the precision of volcanic eruption alerts. To meet this expectation, a comprehensive program, the “Integrated program for next-generation volcano research and human resource development,” sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, was started in November 2016 on a 10-years plan. The most stunning aspect of this program is the integration of (1) a research project and (2) a human resource development program to mitigate volcanic disasters in Japan from long-term point of view. Both of these are collaboratively supported by many researchers from almost all Japanese universities and national institutions related to volcanology. This special issue compiles several topics in this research project to demonstrate its present stage of development and to indicate its anticipated future destination. The target of the research project is to develop, using multi-disciplinary scientific methods, new ways of evaluating volcanic hazards. Specifically, four research groups jointly (A) construct a data archive and exchange system connecting all Japanese volcanologists, (B) develop new geophysical and geochemical observation techniques and methods of analyzing data, (C) evolve methods of predicting volcanic eruptions based on eruption history from precise geological survey and numerical simulations, and (D) propose the provision of technologies for volcanic disasters. We hope that this program will greatly help to mitigate volcanic disasters in Japan, and we will strive to realize this through the research project.

: pp. 571-579
Development of a Data Sharing System for Japan Volcanological Data Network
Abstract
Hideki Ueda, Taishi Yamada, Takahiro Miwa, Masashi Nagai, and Takanori Matsuzawa
: pp. 580-591
Significance of Electromagnetic Surveys at Active Volcanoes: Toward Evaluating the Imminence of Wet Eruptions
Abstract
Takeshi Hashimoto, Wataru Kanda, Yuichi Morita, Midori Hayakawa, Ryo Tanaka, Hiroshi Aoyama, and Makoto Uyeshima
: pp. 592-603
Feasibility Study on a Multi-Channeled Seismometer System with Phase-Shifted Optical Interferometry for Volcanological Observations
Abstract
Tomoki Tsutsui, Yoshiharu Hirayama, Toshiharu Ikeda, Keiji Takeuchi, and Hiroshi Ando
: pp. 604-615
Evaluating Volcanic Hazard Risk Through Numerical Simulations
Abstract
Eisuke Fujita, Yu Iriyama, Toshiki Shimbori, Eiichi Sato, Kensuke Ishii, Yujiro Suzuki, Kae Tsunematsu, and Koji Kiyosugi
: pp. 616-622
A Simple Procedure for Measuring Magma Rheology
Abstract
Aika K. Kurokawa, Takahiro Miwa, and Hidemi Ishibashi
: pp. 623-629
Conveying Volcano Information Effectively to Stakeholders – A New Project for Promotion of Next Generation Volcano Research
Abstract
Setsuya Nakada, Yousuke Miyagi, Tomohiro Kubo, and Eisuke Fujita
: pp. 630-640
Ku-Band High-Speed Scanning Doppler Radar for Volcanic Eruption Monitoring
Abstract
Masayuki Maki, Shinobu Takahashi, Sumiya Okada, Katsuyuki Imai, and Hiroshi Yamaguchi

Regular Papers

: pp. 641-648
Weather Conditions and Warm Air Masses in Southern Sakha During Active Forest Fire Periods
Abstract
Hiroshi Hayasaka, Koji Yamazaki, and Daisuke Naito
: pp. 649-666
Mathematical Model for Locating a Pre-Positioned Warehouse and for Calculating Inventory Levels
Abstract
Erika Barojas-Payán, Diana Sánchez-Partida, José Luis Martínez-Flores, and Damián Emilio Gibaja-Romero
: pp. 667-677
Public Private Partnership Operational Model – A Conceptual Study on Implementing Scientific-Evidence-Based Integrated Risk Management at Regional Level
Abstract
Yanling Lee, Kenji Watanabe, and Wei-Sen Li

No.3

(Mar)

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 4

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 4

: p. 415
Disaster and Big Data Part 4
Shunichi Koshimura

The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami disaster taught us many lessons. Many new findings, insights, and suggestions have been made and implemented in damage determination and in disaster observation, sensing, and simulation. The challenges in terms of mitigating damage from future catastrophic natural disasters, such as the expected Metropolitan Tokyo Earthquake and Nankai Trough Earthquake and Tsunami, are how we share the visions of the possible impacts and prepare to mitigate loss and damage, how we enhance society’s disaster resilience and the ability of society and social systems to prepare well, how we respond promptly and effectively to natural disasters, and how we apply lessons learned to future disaster management.

In recent years, a huge amount of information known as “disaster big data,” including data related to the dynamic movement of a large number of people, vehicles, and goods as IoT, has been obtained to understand how our society responds to natural disasters, both inside and outside the affected areas. The key question is how to utilize disaster big data to enhance disaster resilience.

Researchers with various areas of expertise are working together in a collaborative project called JST CREST: “Establishing the Most Advanced Disaster Reduction Management System by Fusion of Real-Time Disaster Simulation and Big Data Assimilation.” The project aims to identify possible disaster scenarios caused by earthquakes and tsunamis that occur and progress in a chained or compound manner, as well as to create new technologies to lead responses and disaster mitigation measures that help societies recover from disasters.

Since 2016, we have published three special issues entitled “Disaster and Big Data,” and now we will publish a fourth one which includes 10 research papers and 1 report. These aim to share the recent progress of the project as a sequel to Part 3, published in March 2018. As a guest editor of this issue, I would like to express our deep gratitude for the insightful comments and suggestions made by the reviewers and members of the editorial committee. It is my hope that the fruits of everyone’s efforts and outcomes will be utilized in disaster management efforts to mitigate damage and losses from future catastrophic disasters.

: pp. 416-434
Development and Validation of a Tsunami Numerical Model with the Polygonally Nested Grid System and its MPI-Parallelization for Real-Time Tsunami Inundation Forecast on a Regional Scale
Abstract
Takuya Inoue, Takashi Abe, Shunichi Koshimura, Akihiro Musa, Yoichi Murashima, and Hiroaki Kobayashi
: pp. 435-444
Cluster Analysis of the Long-Period Ground-Motion Simulation Data: Application of the Sagami Trough Megathrust Earthquake Scenarios
Abstract
Takahiro Maeda, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Sho Akagi, and Toshihiko Hayakawa
: pp. 445-455
Extraction of Inundation Areas Due to the July 2018 Western Japan Torrential Rain Event Using Multi-Temporal ALOS-2 Images
Abstract
Wen Liu, Fumio Yamazaki, and Yoshihisa Maruyama
: pp. 456-465
Building Damage Assessment Using Intensity SAR Data with Different Incidence Angles and Longtime Interval
Abstract
Pinglan Ge, Hideomi Gokon, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 466-477
Analysis of Traffic State During a Heavy Rain Disaster Using Probe Data
Abstract
Shogo Umeda, Yosuke Kawasaki, and Masao Kuwahara
: pp. 478-488
Quick Estimation Method of Property Damage and Human Casualty in the Event of a Large Earthquake
Abstract
Takuya Oki, Toshihiro Osaragi, and Yoho Sakamoto
: pp. 489-499
Relationships Between Accessibility of Emergency Vehicles and Local Environments in Tokyo Metropolitan Area After a Large Earthquake
Abstract
Maki Kishimoto and Toshihiro Osaragi
: pp. 500-507
Optimal Mobility Control of Sensors in the Event of a Disaster
Abstract
Yuichi Nakamura, Masaki Ito, and Kaoru Sezaki
: pp. 508-520
Estimation of Supply Chain Network Disruption of Companies Across the Country Affected by the Nankai Trough Earthquake Tsunami in Kochi City
Abstract
Yoshiki Ogawa, Yuki Akiyama, Muneta Yokomatsu, Yoshihide Sekimoto, and Ryosuke Shibasaki
: pp. 521-530
Analysis of Evacuation Trajectory Data Using Tensor Decomposition
Abstract
Yusuke Kawai, Yoshiharu Ishikawa, and Kento Sugiura
: pp. 531-538
An Analysis of Web Coverage on the 2018 West Japan Heavy Rain Disaster
Abstract
Shosuke Sato and Fumihiko Imamura

Regular Papers

: pp. 539-551
Analysis of Optimal Scale of Tsunami Protection Facility and Associated Residual Risk
Abstract
Koji Fujima and Yasuko Hiwatashi

No.2

(Mar)

Special Issue on Enhancement of Societal Resiliency Against Natural Disasters

Special Issue on Enhancement of Societal Resiliency Against Natural Disasters

: p. 211
Enhancement of Societal Resiliency Against Natural Disasters
Muneo Hori

Enhancing social resilience in the event of natural disasters is a critical issue for Japan. It will requires a need huge efforts to further increase the physical preparedness; on the other hand, compared to increasing physical preparedness, enhancing social resilience is a cost-effective means of mitigating the effects of natural disasters. The Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion program (SIP), the biggest national research program in Japan, selected a theme related to enhancing social resilience in the face of natural disasters in 2014. The authors of this special issue worked as a part of the SIP for five years and developed state-of-the-art technologies for the enhancement, namely, next-generation tsunami and heavy rain observation, integrated liquefaction counter-measures, methods for sharing disaster information, a real-time disaster estimation system, an emergency communication system, and the development of applications for regional use. Most of the technologies have been implemented in efforts at natural disaster mitigation following earthquakes and heavy rains in 2017 and 2018. The development and implementation of advanced technologies are the essence of the SIP because it aims to foster innovation. While the SIP is a Japanese government program, it promotes international utilization of the technologies it develops. There are many instances which might be studied better by developing and utilizing advanced technologies in various countries following different types of natural disasters. I hope that this special issue will be a gateway for readers who are interested in using such advanced technologies to mitigate natural disasters and enhance social resilience during such events.

: pp. 212-224
Development and Utilization of Real-Time Tsunami Inundation Forecast System Using S-net Data
Abstract
Shin Aoi, Wataru Suzuki, Naotaka Yamamoto Chikasada, Takayuki Miyoshi, Taro Arikawa, and Katsumi Seki
: pp. 225-234
Development and Applicability of Multiscale Multiphysics Integrated Simulator for Tsunami
Abstract
Taro Arikawa, Yu Chida, Katsumi Seki, Tomohiro Takagawa, and Kenichiro Shimosako
: pp. 235-247
Development of Multi-Parameter Phased Array Weather Radar (MP-PAWR) and Early Detection of Torrential Rainfall and Tornado Risk
Abstract
Nobuhiro Takahashi, Tomoo Ushio, Katsuhiro Nakagawa, Fumihiko Mizutani, Koyuru Iwanami, Akihiko Yamaji, Takeshi Kawagoe, Masahiko Osada, Takehiro Ohta, and Masaki Kawasaki
: pp. 248-259
Statistical Validation of the Predicted Amount and Start Time of Heavy Rainfall in 2015 Based on the VIL Nowcast Method
Abstract
Koyuru Iwanami, Kohin Hirano, and Shingo Shimizu
: pp. 260-268
Development of a Practical River Water Level Prediction Method Using Data Assimilation Technique
Abstract
Shuichi Tsuchiya and Masaki Kawasaki
: pp. 269-278
Development of a Seismic-Performance Assessment Method and Retrofitting Technology Against the Liquefaction of Existing Bridges
Abstract
Michio Ohsumi, Toshiaki Nanazawa, Shunsuke Tanimoto, and Mitsuhiko Nakata
: pp. 279-291
The Shared Information Platform for Disaster Management –The Research and Development Regarding Technologies for Utilization of Disaster Information–
Abstract
Yuichiro Usuda, Takashi Matsui, Hiroshi Deguchi, Toshikazu Hori, and Shingo Suzuki
: pp. 292-302
Current Disaster Medicine in Japan and the Change Brought by Information Sharing
Abstract
Yuji Kondo, Manabu Ichikawa, Hisayoshi Kondo, Yuichi Koido, and Yasuhiro Otomo
: pp. 303-314
Development of Disaster Prevention Support System for Irrigation Pond (DPSIP)
Abstract
Toshikazu Hori, Akira Izumi, Daisuke Shoda, Tetsushi Shigeoka, and Hiroshi Yoshisako
: pp. 315-332
Development of a Real-Time Damage Estimation System
Abstract
Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Hiromitsu Nakamura, Shigeki Senna, Hideyuki Otani, Naoya Tomii, Kiyonori Ohtake, Toshiya Mori, and Shojiro Kataoka
: pp. 333-347
Development of Real-Time Collection, Integration, and Sharing Technology for Infrastructure Damage Information
Abstract
Moemi Shiraishi, Hideyuki Ashiya, Arata Konno, Kenji Morita, Tomoyuki Noro, Yasuhiro Nomura, and Shojiro Kataoka
: pp. 348-362
Development of Resilient Information and Communications Technology for Relief Against Natural Disasters
Abstract
Hiroshi Kumagai, Hiroshi Sakurauchi, Shinsuke Koitabashi, Takeaki Uchiyama, Shinichi Sasaki, Kazuhide Noda, Makoto Ishizaki, Satoshi Kotabe, Atsushi Yamamoto, Yoshitaka Shimizu, Yasuo Suzuki, Yasunori Owada, Katsuhiro Temma, Goshi Sato, Toshiaki Miyazaki, Peng Li, Yuichi Kawamoto, Nei Kato, and Hiroki Nishiyama
: pp. 363-374
Development of Movable and Deployable ICT Resource Unit (MDRU) and its Overseas Activities
Abstract
Yoshitaka Shimizu, Yasuo Suzuki, Ryota Sasazawa, Yuichi Kawamoto, Hiroki Nishiyama, Nei Kato, Atsushi Yamamoto, and Satoshi Kotabe
: pp. 375-386
Development of Disaster Response Applications and Improvements in Regional Disaster Prevention Capacity Based on Collaborative Information Use
Abstract
Toshihiro Noda, Katsuya Yamori, and Kenji Harada
: pp. 387-404
Disaster Response and Mitigation Support Technology for All-Hazards in Tokyo Metropolitan Area
Abstract
Yoshiaki Hisada, Toshihiro Osaragi, Masahiro Murakami, Osamu Mizuno, Wataru Kobayashi, Susumu Yasuda, Miho Ohara, Tomohisa Yamashita, Kazuyuki Takada, Takashi Suematsu, Jun Shindo, Takuya Oki, and Akira Kakizaki

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products: Part 2

Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products: Part 2

: p. 5
Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products: Part 2
Masato Iguchi, Setsuya Nakada, and Kuniaki Miyamoto

Our research project titled “Integrated study on mitigation of multimodal disasters caused by ejection of volcanic products” began in 2014 under SATREPS (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development) and is now coming to an end in 2019. Indonesia has 127 active volcanoes distributed along its archipelago making it a high risk location for volcano-related disasters. The target volcanoes in our study are Guntur, Galunggung, Merapi, Kelud, and Semeru in Java, and Sinabung in North Sumatra. Guntur and Galunggung are currently dormant and are potentially high-risk volcanoes. Merapi generated pyroclastic flows along the Gendol River in 2010, which resulted in over 300 casualties and induced frequent lahars. New eruptive activity of Merapi began in 2018. The 2014 eruption of Kelud formed a gigantic ash plume over 17 km high, dispersing ash widely over the island of Java. Semeru continued minor eruptive activity, accompanying a risk of a dome collapse. The aim of our research includes disaster mitigation of the Sinabung volcano, whose eruption began to form a lava dome at its summit at the end of 2013, followed by frequent pyroclastic flows for approximately 4 years, and the deposits became the source of rain-triggered lahars. Our goal is to implement SSDM (Support System for Decision-Making), which would allow us to forecast volcano-related hazards based on scales and types of eruptions inferred from monitoring data. This special issue collects fundamental scientific knowledge and technology for the SSDM as output from our project. The SSDM is an integrated system of monitoring, constructed scenarios, forecasting scale of eruption, simulation of sediment movement and volcanic ash dispersion in the atmosphere. X-band radars newly installed by our project in Indonesia were well utilized for estimation of spatial distribution not only of rain fall in catchments but also of volcanic ash clouds. Finally, we hope the SSDM will continue to be utilized under a consortium in Merapi, which was newly established in collaboration with our projects, and extended to other volcanoes.

: pp. 6-17
A Newly Installed Seismic and Geodetic Observational System at Five Indonesian Volcanoes as Part of the SATREPS Project
Abstract
Haruhisa Nakamichi, Masato Iguchi, Hetty Triastuty, Hery Kuswandarto, Iyan Mulyana, Umar Rosadi, Hendra Gunawan, Gude Suantika, Nurnaning Aisyah, Agus Budi-Santoso, and I Gusti Made Agung Nandaka
: pp. 18-26
Overview of Merapi Volcanic Activities from Monitoring Data 1992–2011 Periods
Abstract
I Gusti Made Agung Nandaka, Sulistiyani, Yosef Suharna, and Raditya Putra
: pp. 27-39
Eruption Pattern and a Long-Term Magma Discharge Rate over the Past 100 Years at Kelud Volcano, Indonesia
Abstract
Fukashi Maeno, Setsuya Nakada, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Taketo Shimano, Natsumi Hokanishi, Akhmad Zaennudin, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 40-50
Eruption Scenarios of Active Volcanoes in Indonesia
Abstract
Setsuya Nakada, Fukashi Maeno, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Natsumi Hokanishi, Taketo Shimano, Akhmad Zaennudin, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 51-60
Forecast of the Pyroclastic Volume by Precursory Seismicity of Merapi Volcano
Abstract
Masato Iguchi, Haruhisa Nakamichi, Kuniaki Miyamoto, Makoto Shimomura, I Gusti Made Agung Nandaka, Agus Budi-Santoso, Sulistiyani, and Nurnaning Aisyah
: pp. 61-68
Temporal Changes in Runoff Characteristics of Lahars After the 1984 Eruption of Mt. Merapi, Indonesia
Abstract
Yutaka Gonda, Shusuke Miyata, Masaharu Fujita, Djoko Legono, and Daizo Tsutsumi
: pp. 69-79
Improving Spatial Rainfall Estimates at Mt. Merapi Area Using Radar-Rain Gauge Conditional Merging
Abstract
Roby Hambali, Djoko Legono, Rachmad Jayadi, and Satoru Oishi
: pp. 80-89
Point-Based Rainfall Intensity Information System in Mt. Merapi Area by X-Band Radar
Abstract
Santosa Sandy Putra, Banata Wachid Ridwan, Kazuki Yamanoi, Makoto Shimomura, Sulistiyani, and Dicky Hadiyuwono
: pp. 90-104
Numerical Simulation of Historical Pyroclastic Flows of Merapi (1994, 2001, and 2006 Eruptions)
Abstract
Niken Angga Rukmini, Sulistiyani, and Makoto Shimomura
: pp. 105-115
Numerical Simulation of Mt. Merapi Pyroclastic Flow in 2010
Abstract
Makoto Shimomura, Raditya Putra, Niken Angga Rukmini, and Sulistiyani
: pp. 116-125
Numerical Simulation of Pyroclastic Flow at Mt. Semeru in 2002
Abstract
Makoto Shimomura, Wilfridus F. S. Banggur, and Agoes Loeqman
: pp. 126-134
Proposal of Estimation Method for Debris Flow Potential Considering Eruptive Activity
Abstract
Masato Iguchi
: pp. 135-150
Estimating the Volcanic Ash Fall Rate from the Mount Sinabung Eruption on February 19, 2018 Using Weather Radar
Abstract
Magfira Syarifuddin, Satoru Oishi, Ratih Indri Hapsari, Jiro Shiokawa, Hanggar Ganara Mawandha, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 151-159
Ground Observation of Tephra Particles: On the Use of Weather Radar for Estimating Volcanic Ash Distribution
Abstract
Ratih Indri Hapsari, Masahiro Iida, Masahide Muranishi, Mariko Ogawa, Magfira Syarifuddin, Masato Iguchi, and Satoru Oishi
: pp. 160-172
Numerical Simulations of Volcanic Ash Plume Dispersal for Sakura-Jima Using Real-Time Emission Rate Estimation
Abstract
Hiroshi L. Tanaka and Masato Iguchi

Regular Papers

: pp. 173-187
Disaster Management Following Decentralization in Indonesia: Regulation, Institutional Establishment, Planning, and Budgeting
Abstract
Danang Insita Putra and Mihoko Matsuyuki
: pp. 188-197
Assessing the Influence of Cell Size on Flood Modelling by the PWRI-DH Model Using IFA
Abstract
Amaly Fong Lee and Yoshiaki Kawata

Vol.13 (2018)

Scientific Communication Online

: sc20181204
Coastal Subsidence Induced Several Tsunamis During the 2018 Sulawesi Earthquake
Abstract
Taro Arikawa, Abdul Muhari, Yoshihiro Okumura, Yuji Dohi, Bagus Afriyanto, Karina Aprilia Sujatmiko, and Fumihiko Imamura
: sc20181108
Solving the Puzzle of the September 2018 Palu, Indonesia, Tsunami Mystery: Clues from the Tsunami Waveform and the Initial Field Survey Data
Abstract
Abdul Muhari, Fumihiko Imamura, Taro Arikawa, Aradea R. Hakim, and Bagus Afriyanto

No.7

(Dec)

Special Issue on Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017
Special Issue on the First World Bosai Forum

Special Issue on Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017

: p. 1167
Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017
Toshio Koike, Kenji Satake, and Akiyuki Kawasaki

The Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience was held in Tokyo from 23 to 25 November 2017 with 228 participants from 42 countries. To implement the priorities for action in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) 2015–2030, the Forum aimed to encourage all stakeholders to develop guidelines for supporting national platforms for DRR by making the best use of science and technology and producing a synthesis report on disaster science and technology.

During the Forum, seven working groups held presentations and panel discussions that corresponded to the four priorities for action in the Sendai Framework (1. Understanding disaster risk; 2. Strengthening disaster risk governance; 3. Investing in DDR; and 4. “Build Back Better”), as well as on Interdisciplinary collaboration, National platforms, and Synthesis report.

At the end of the Forum, seven policy briefs, as well as “Tokyo Statement 2017,” were adopted. In this special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research, co-chairs of the working groups summarize their discussions and recommendations for each working group. Additional papers on the role of private sectors and Nation’s Synthesis are also included in the issue.

We thank all the authors and reviewers of the papers, as well as all the participants of the Forum for their valuable contributions.

: pp. 1168-1176
Understanding Disaster Risk: The Role of Science and Technology
Abstract
Kenji Satake, Craig McLean, and Irasema Alcántara-Ayala
: pp. 1177-1180
Strengthening Disaster Risk Governance to Manage Disaster Risk: Output of the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017
Abstract
Kenichi Tsukahara
: pp. 1181-1186
Investing in Disaster Risk Reduction for Resilience: Roles of Science, Technology, and Education
Abstract
Akiyuki Kawasaki and Jakob Rhyner
: pp. 1187-1192
Formalizing the Concept of “Build Back Better” Based on the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017 WG4
Abstract
Keiko Tamura, Irina Rafliana, and Paul Kovacs
: pp. 1193-1198
Promotion of Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Collaboration in Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Kaoru Takara
: pp. 1199-1206
Strengthening National Platforms for Effective Use of Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Satoru Nishikawa
: pp. 1207-1212
Role of Private Sectors in Disaster Risk Reduction: Potential and Challenges
Abstract
Rajib Shaw
: pp. 1213-1221
Exploring the Possibility of an Online Synthesis System for Disaster Risk Reduction as a Tool to Promote “Consilience” of Knowledge and Practice
Abstract
Haruo Hayashi, Rajib Shaw, and Brian Doherty
: pp. 1222-1232
Role Played by Science and Technology in Disaster Risk Reduction: From Framework Planning to Implementation
Abstract
Toshio Koike, Haruo Hayashi, Kenji Satake, Kenichi Tsukahara, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Yusuke Amano, Kaoru Takara, Setsuko Saya, Naohiro Nishiguchi, Satoru Nishikawa, Keiko Tamura, Kenzo Hiroki, Rajib Shaw, and Tetsuya Ikeda

Special Issue on the First World Bosai Forum

: p. 1233
the First World Bosai Forum
Fumihiko Imamura, Yuichi Ono, and Daisuke Sasaki

The World Bosai Forum was held at the Sendai International Center and Kawauchi Hagi Hall, Tohoku University, bringing together 947 participants from over 42 countries. This was nearly double the number of participants that we had initially expected. Proactive and meaningful discussions were held by a wide range of officials and experts from domestic and overseas industries, governments, academia, and private sectors, as well as by local citizens. From our partnership with the Asian Conference on Urban Disaster Reduction (ACUDR) and International Symposium on New Technologies for Urban Safety of Mega Cities in Asia (USMCA), we had a total of 126 participants.

We successfully created a platform for building international cooperation to share and resolve the current situation and handle various challenges for Bosai or disaster risk reduction. Practical and effective discussions have contributed to raising and promoting awareness of Bosai and the Sendai Framework 2015–2030 to the world from Sendai. Our first World Bosai Forum was concluded with productive outcomes, and its future meetings will be held every 2 years.

The guest editors of this special issue are pleased to publish valuable academic papers presented at the first World Bosai Forum. As you may notice, this research stems from a wide variety of current issues. The nature of interdisciplinary approaches may be unique to the World Bosai Forum, and the guest editors hope that this special issue will contribute to enhanced recognition of the Forum.

: pp. 1234-1246
Overview of the World Bosai Forum Public Cultural Event: “Pre-WBF Festival – Learning from the Disaster, Bridging to the Future: Held in Partnership with the Science Agora”
Abstract
Natsuko Chubachi, Yuichi Ono, Kiyoshi Ito, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1247-1256
Efforts Toward Recovery and Reconstruction from the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Hiroaki Maruya and Yasunari Watanabe
: pp. 1257-1271
Dynamic Integrated Model for Disaster Management and Socioeconomic Analysis (DIM2SEA)
Abstract
Erick Mas, Daniel Felsenstein, Luis Moya, A. Yair Grinberger, Rubel Das, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 1272-1287
Global Tsunami Risk Assessment: Collaboration Between Industry and Academia in the Willis Research Network (WRN)
Abstract
Kwanchai Pakoksung, Anawat Suppasri, Panon Latcharote, Abdul Muhari, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1288-1297
Sustainable Community Development for Disaster Resilience and Human Resources Development for Disaster Risk Reduction – Katahira-Style Disaster Resilient Community Development –
Abstract
Takeshi Sato, Aiko Sakurai, Yuki Sadaike, Hitoshi Konno, Masahiro Horino, Risa Yanagiya, and Takahisa Mizoi
: pp. 1298-1308
Analysis of Complexities in Natech Disaster Risk Reduction and Management: A Case Study of Cilegon, Indonesia
Abstract
Fatma Lestari, Dicky Pelupessy, Yasuhito Jibiki, Fiori Amelia Putri, Ahmad Yurianto, Gama Widyaputra, Sony Maulana, Cynthia Febrina Maharani, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1309-1322
Exploring the Developmental Process and Internal Structure of Kizuki-Based Volunteer Activities for Sustainable Organizations: A Case Study of HARU
Abstract
Kohei Nishizuka
: pp. 1323-1332
Function of Social Capital Embedded in Religious Communities at Times of Disaster: Cases of Disaster Relief Activity by a Muslim Community and a Soka Gakkai Community in Japan
Abstract
Nobuyuki Asai

Regular Papers

: pp. 1333-1344
Repairing and Recovering Structural Performance of Earthen Walls Used in Japanese Dozo-Style Structures After Seismic Damage
Abstract
Hajime Yokouchi and Yoshimitsu Ohashi

No.6

(Nov)

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics

: p. 1001
the Development of Disaster Statistics
Yuichi Ono and Daisuke Sasaki

This special issue presents the findings obtained so far by the relevant studies that have been conducted mainly at the Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS), which is affiliated with the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) at Tohoku University, Japan.

The establishment of the GCDS was jointly announced by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the IRIDeS in March 2015 during the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (UNWCDRR) in Sendai, Japan. The Centre is expected to contribute greatly to sustainable development, based on risk-informed policy making, through the following activities: providing scientific analyses and technical advice based on their disaster loss and damage data, supporting the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and individual countries in the work of monitoring the progress of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and providing policy advice to build the capacities of national/local governments, based on their demands.

In this context, the guest editors of this special issue are pleased to publish valuable academic articles closely related to the GCDS’ activities that contribute to the development of disaster statistics. As Sasaki and Ono (2018) observed, there exist three major categories of research questions that contribute to the development of disaster statistics: investigation into disaster statistics and/or global disaster-related databases, development of the existing discipline-based research, and analysis of various issues through questionnaire surveys.

Last but not least, it is our hope that this special issue contributes to the literature of disaster statistics and accelerates its development.

: pp. 1002-1006
Overview of the Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1007-1014
Comparison of Global Databases for Disaster Loss and Damage Data
Abstract
Kana Moriyama, Daisuke Sasaki, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1015-1023
Proposed Requirement Definition Method for Developing Global Disaster Database Based on Various Means of Data Collection
Abstract
Hidemi Tanaka, Daisuke Sasaki, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1024-1031
The Purpose of the Statistical Database on the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Hiroaki Maruya and Tetsuya Torayashiki
: pp. 1032-1038
Hidden Common Factors in Disaster Loss Statistics: A Case Study Analyzing the Data of Nepal
Abstract
Daisuke Sasaki, Kana Moriyama, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1039-1048
Vulnerability Characteristics of Tsunamis in Indonesia: Analysis of the Global Centre for Disaster Statistics Database
Abstract
Anawat Suppasri, Abdul Muhari, Syamsidik, Ridwan Yunus, Kwanchai Pakoksung, Fumihiko Imamura, Shunichi Koshimura, and Ryan Paulik
: pp. 1049-1061
The Correlation Between Life Expectancy and Disaster Risk
Abstract
Shinichi Egawa, Yasuhito Jibiki, Daisuke Sasaki, Yuichi Ono, Yayoi Nakamura, Tomomi Suda, and Hiroyuki Sasaki
: pp. 1062-1071
Variability in an Optimal Infrastructure Management Policy by Internalization of Seismic Risk
Abstract
Daijiro Mizutani
: pp. 1072-1081
A Statistical Analysis of Japanese Inter-Prefectural Migration After Disasters
Abstract
Makoto Okumura and Wataru Ito
: pp. 1082-1095
Perceptions of Volcanic Hazard-Related Information Relevant to Volcano Tourism Areas in Japan
Abstract
Miwa Kuri and Anawat Suppasri
: pp. 1096-1112
Statistical Analysis of the Relationship Between Social Capital and Evacuation: The Case of the 2017 Mt. Agung Eruption
Abstract
Michimasa Matsumoto, Miwa Kuri, Kazuya Sugiyasu, Yasuhito Jibiki, Ni Nengah Suartini, and I Made Budiana
: pp. 1113-1124
Evacuation from Tsunami and Social Capital in Numanouchi Ward, Iwaki City
Abstract
Michimasa Matsumoto and Kaori Madarame
: pp. 1125-1141
Differentiation and Integration of Evacuees with Regard to Lifting the Evacuation Order Following the Nuclear Power Plant Accident: A Case Study of Naraha and Tomioka Towns, Futaba District, Fukushima Prefecture
Abstract
Michimasa Matsumoto
: pp. 1142-1156
Formation of Third Place by Evacuees from Nuclear Accident: Case Study of Wide Area Residents’ Association of Tomioka Town, Futaba County, Fukushima Prefecture
Abstract
Michimasa Matsumoto

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2018

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2018

: p. 831
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2018
Haruo Hayashi and Toshikazu Tanada

The National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED) is working on three tasks: predicting disasters, preventing damage, and realizing speedy reconstruction and recovery efforts in the event of natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, landslides, torrential rains, blizzards, and ice storms.

In the last two years of the NIED’s fourth mid/long term plan period, which began in 2016, the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (M6.5 and M7.3), the heavy rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July 2017, and the heavy rain event of July 2018 are listed as “named” disasters, named by Japan Meteorological Agency. In addition, there were other disasters: an avalanche accident on Nasudake in 2017, an earthquake (M6.1) with its epicenter in northern Osaka, an eruption of Kirishimayama (Shinmoedake and Ioyama) and a phreatic eruption of Kusatsu-Shiranesan in 2018.

The results of research done on the above-mentioned disasters and the latest results of ongoing projects in each research division and center were compiled as the second NIED special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR). In this special issue, we are delighted to present ten papers on three topics: climatic disasters, seismic disasters, and integrated research on disaster risk reduction. In particular, this special issue contains three papers on the above-mentioned heavy rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July 2017 and two papers related to the Kumamoto earthquake.

Although the achievements detailed in these papers are the results of individual research, the NIED hopes that these results as a whole will be fully utilized to promote science and technology for disaster risk reduction and resilience. The NIED hopes that this special issue awakens the readers’ interest in new research and, of course, creates an opportunity for further collaborative works with us.

: pp. 832-845
Spatial Analysis of the Landslide Characteristics Caused by Heavy Rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July, 2017 Using Topography, Geology, and Rainfall Levels
Abstract
Toru Danjo, Tomohiro Ishizawa, and Takashi Kimura
: pp. 846-859
Predictability of Precipitation Caused by Linear Precipitation Systems During the July 2017 Northern Kyushu Heavy Rainfall Event Using a Cloud-Resolving Numerical Weather Prediction Model
Abstract
Ryohei Kato, Ken-ichi Shimose, and Shingo Shimizu
: pp. 860-872
Analysis of Flood Inundation in Ungauged Mountainous River Basins: A Case Study of an Extreme Rain Event on 5–6 July 2017 in Northern Kyushu, Japan
Abstract
Shakti P. C., Tsuyoshi Nakatani, and Ryohei Misumi
: pp. 873-878
Introducing Quantile Mapping to a Regression Model Using a Multi-Model Ensemble to Improve Probabilistic Projections of Monthly Precipitation
Abstract
Noriko N. Ishizaki, Koji Dairaku, and Genta Ueno
: pp. 879-885
Gaps Between the Transmission and Reception of Information on Rainfall Amounts
Abstract
Kan Shimazaki, Hiroko Nakajima, Naoki Sakai, and Akiko Miyajima
: pp. 886-896
Automatic Generation of an Evaluation Model of Regional Disaster Prevention Activities Based on Self-Evaluation Questionnaire
Abstract
Qinglin Cui, Taiyoung Yi, Kan Shimazaki, Hitoshi Taguchi, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 897-916
Experimental Evaluation on Earthquake-Resistance of Road Retaining Wall Using Gabion
Abstract
Hiroshi Nakazawa, Tadashi Hara, Daisuke Suetsugu, Tsuyoshi Nishi, Kentaro Kuribayashi, Katsuaki Miyoshi, and Shoji Shimomura
: pp. 917-927
Modeling of the Subsurface Structure from the Seismic Bedrock to the Ground Surface for a Broadband Strong Motion Evaluation in Kumamoto Plain
Abstract
Shigeki Senna, Atsushi Wakai, Haruhiko Suzuki, Atsushi Yatagai, Hisanori Matsuyama, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 928-942
Damage Detection Method for Buildings with Machine-Learning Techniques Utilizing Images of Automobile Running Surveys Aftermath of the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Shohei Naito, Hiromitsu Tomozawa, Yuji Mori, Hiromitsu Nakamura, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 943-956
Strong Motion and Tsunami Related to the AD 365 Crete Earthquake
Abstract
Tsuneo Ohsumi, Yuji Dohi, and Hemanta Hazarika

Regular Papers

: pp. 957-966
Reviewing National Cybersecurity Strategies
Abstract
Shigeo Mori and Atsuhiro Goto
: pp. 967-977
Flood and Substance Transportation Analysis Using Satellite Elevation Data: A Case Study in Dhaka City, Bangladesh
Abstract
Masakazu Hashimoto, Nozomu Yoneyama, Kenji Kawaike, Tomonori Deguchi, Mohammed Abed Hossain, and Hajime Nakagawa
: pp. 978-984
Flood Preparedness: Challenges for Hospitals in Thailand
Abstract
Uma Langkulsen, Desire T. Rwodzi, Marc Van der Putten, and Nitaya Vajanapoom

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Expectations for Upgrading Dams Under Operation
Special Issue on Infectious Disease Control in SATREPS Projects

Special Issue on Expectations for Upgrading Dams Under Operation

: pp. 581-584
Expectations for Upgrading Dams Under Operation
Tetsuya Sumi, Makoto Nakatsugawa, and Yoshikazu Yamaguchi

1. Introduction There are approximately 2,700 dams in Japan. Their total reservoir capacity is approximately 25 billion m3 (BCM), far less than the 34.4 BCM of Hoover Dam in the US or the 39.3 BCM of the Three Gorges Dam in China. Lake Biwa, with a capacity of 27.5 BCM, which has recently been used for multiple purposes by the Lake Biwa Comprehensive Development Project, is equivalent in scale to such artificial lakes. On the other hand, dams in Japan that were constructed on mountain rivers with considerable sediment deposits are decreasing their capacity more rapidly than those constructed on continental rivers, so they require measures against deposition to maintain their long-term reservoir capacity. In addition, extreme weather phenomena (increased rainfall and drought intensity) under climate changes increase high demand for storage capacity of dams. In order to effectively use these dams as limited resources and to hand them over to the next generation in healthy state, continuous investment and development of maintenance technology are required. Recently, to promote this investment and development, “A vision for upgrading dams (effective use of existing dams to mitigate damage from frequent floods and droughts and to generate renewable energy)” was established by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport, and Tourism (MLIT) on June 27, 2017 [1]. This special issue is collecting the significance of the dam upgrading projects and important challenges from various aspects to be implemented. for further details, please refer the pdf.
(more…)

: pp. 585-594
Trends in Dam Upgrading in Japan
Abstract
Takashi Sasaki and Masafumi Kondo
: pp. 595-604
Technical Features of Shin-Katsurazawa Dam to Be Coaxially Raised with Existent Dam and Measures to Solve the Problems Involved
Abstract
Shun Sasaki, Koichiro Suzuki, Atsuhisa Yoshino, and Seiichi Chouno
: pp. 605-615
Technical Features of Tsuruta Dam Redevelopment Project
Abstract
Koji Sakamoto, Yoshimitsu Takayama, and Shoichiro Yamamura
: pp. 616-623
Comprehensive Inspection of Japanese Dams in Long-Term Operation
Abstract
Masafumi Kondo and Shuji Anan
: pp. 624-636
Field Verification and Evaluation of Technology Towards Introduction of Underwater Inspection Vehicle
Abstract
Yasushi Nitta and Takashi Yoshida
: pp. 637-649
Quantification of the Risks on Dam Preliminary Release Based on Ensemble Rainfall Forecasts and Determination of Operation
Abstract
Hironori Inomata, Masaki Kawasaki, and Shun Kudo
: pp. 650-659
Reservoir Operation for Water Supply Considering Operational Ensemble Hydrological Predictions
Abstract
Daisuke Nohara and Tomoharu Hori
: pp. 660-667
Collaborative and Adaptive Dam Operation for Flood Control
Abstract
Kenji Someya
: pp. 668-676
Current and Future Study Topics on Reservoir Sediment Management by Bypass Tunnels
Abstract
Sohei Kobayashi, Takahiro Koshiba, and Tetsuya Sumi
: pp. 677-690
Free-Flow Sediment Flushing: Insights from Prototype-Scale Studies
Abstract
Taymaz Esmaeili, Tetsuya Sumi, Sameh A. Kantoush, and Yoji Kubota
: pp. 691-701
Effectiveness of Flexible Dam Operation and Sediment Replenishment at Managawa Dam, Japan
Abstract
Katsumi Matsushima, Makoto Hyodo, Noriyuki Shibata, and Yoshihiro Shimizu
: pp. 702-708
Planning and Analysis of Sedimentation Countermeasures in Hydropower Dams Considering Properties of Reservoir Sedimentation
Abstract
Chihaya Onda, Tetsuya Sumi, and Tsuyoshi Asahi
: pp. 709-719
Environmental Impact Assessment Plan Due to Sediment Sluicing at Dams Along Mimikawa River System
Abstract
Takeshi Yoshimura and Hiroki Shinya
: pp. 720-732
Evaluation of Diverse Values of Hydropower
Abstract
Motoyuki Inoue

Special Issue on Infectious Disease Control in SATREPS Projects

: pp. 733-734
Infectious Disease Control in SATREPS Projects
Sumio Shinoda

The Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) is a Japanese government program that promotes international joint research. The program is structured as a collaboration between the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The program includes various fields, such as Environment and Energy, Bioresources, Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, and Infectious Disease Control, and a total 52 projects were currently in progress as of May, 2018.

It is expected that the promotion of international joint research under this program will enable Japanese research institutions to conduct research more effectively in fields and having targets that make it advantageous to do that research in developing countries, including countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia, and Africa.

Recently, SATREPS projects in the field of Infectious Disease have been but under the control of the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED). Although adult maladies, such as malignant tumors, heart disease, and cerebral apoplexy, are major causes of death in the developed countries including Japan, infectious diseases are still responsible for the high mortality rates in developing countries. Therefore, Infectious Disease Control is the important field of SATREPS.

Infectious Disease Control projects are progressing in several countries, including Kenya, Zambia, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Brazil, and various infectious diseases and pathogens have been targeted.

In this special issue on Infectious Disease Control, the following reports from three projects have been selected: “The JICA-AMED SATREPS Project to Control Outbreaks of Yellow Fever and Rift Valley Fever in Kenya” by Nagasaki University, “Comprehensive Etiological and Epidemiological Study on Acute Respiratory Infections in Children in the Philippines” by Tohoku University, and “International Joint Research on Antifungal Resistant Fungi in Brazil” by Chiba University. These projects include viral, bacterial, and fungal infections.

If they become available, further supplementary reports from other projects in this field will be published in a future issue.

: pp. 735-739
Approaches of the JICA-AMED SATREPS Project to Controlling Outbreaks of Yellow Fever and Rift Valley Fever in Kenya
Abstract
Shingo Inoue
: pp. 740-750
Comprehensive Etiological and Epidemiological Study on Acute Respiratory Infections in Children: Providing Evidence for the Prevention and Control of Childhood Pneumonia in the Philippines
Abstract
Raita Tamaki, Veronica L. Tallo, Alvin G. Tan, Mark Donald C. Reñosa, Portia P. Alday, Jhoys M. Landicho, Marianette T. Inobaya, Mayuko Saito, Taro Kamigaki, Michiko Okamoto, Mariko Saito, Clyde Dapat, Bindongo P. P. Dembele, Mary Lorraine S. Mationg, Melisa U. Mondoy, Socorro P. Lupisan, and Hitoshi Oshitani
: pp. 751-753
International Joint Research on Antifungal Resistant Fungi: Collaborative Studies with the University of Campinas, Brazil
Abstract
Akira Watanabe and Katsuhiko Kamei

Regular Papers

: pp. 755-766
Community Proactivity in Disaster Preparation: Research Based on Two Communities in Japan
Abstract
Takaaki Hashimoto, Kaori Karasawa, Kazuyuki Hirayama, Masanori Wada, and Hiroshi Hosaka
: pp. 767-779
High Resolution Numerical Model for Salinity Transport in Rivers During a Tsunami Attack
Abstract
Hiroshi Nagashima and Nozomu Yoneyama
: pp. 780-792
Effectiveness of the Submersible Embankment in Haor Area in Bangladesh
Abstract
Mohammad Hossain Mahtab, Miho Ohara, and Mohamed Rasmy
: pp. 793-803
Floods in Southern Thailand in December 2016 and January 2017
Abstract
Taichi Tebakari, Sanit Wongsa, and Yoshiaki Hayashi
: pp. 804-812
Observed Hospital Damages Following the 2014 Mae Lao (Northern Thailand) Earthquake: A Survey Report
Abstract
Teraphan Ornthammarath and Titima Puavaranukroh
: pp. 813-816
The Earthquake in Ōsaka-Fu Hokubu on 18 June 2018 and its Ensuing Disaster
Abstract
Naoshi Hirata and Reo Kimura

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Application of GNSS for Mitigating Natural Disaster

Special Issue on Application of GNSS for Mitigating Natural Disaster

: p. 423
Application of GNSS for Mitigating Natural Disaster
Teruyuki Kato, Yusaku Ohta, and Hiroshi Munekane

The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has been utilized in a variety of research fields within the geosciences. This research has been further developed for application to hazard monitoring and natural disaster mitigation. Some developments have even been implemented in society in countermeasures against natural disasters. The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI), for example, has established a nationwide GNSS network called GEONET. The data from GEONET are used extensively among researchers and practitioners, not only for basic research but also for the development of methods and systems that can mitigate disasters. This special volume is a collection of articles that discuss how such methods and systems are now being developed and/or planned to both clarify the mechanisms behind natural hazards and mitigate the damage they may cause. The volume consists of 13 papers covering a wide range of natural phenomena, such as earthquakes, crustal movements, tsunamis, ionospheric disturbances, and volcanic eruptions. Some papers help us to understand how natural hazards behave, which should be the first step toward disaster mitigation. On the other hand, other articles report direct efforts made toward providing early warnings of impending disasters. Disaster mitigation systems may require real-time (and even kinematic with high-rate data sampling) processing and dissemination of data. Moreover, some applications involve data collection from coastal waters and the open sea. Now that the density of GNSS stations has approached saturation on land, the scarcity of data collected offshore will have to be rectified through the development of GNSS systems in the ocean. We do hope that this volume will be a step in the further progress of utilizing GNSS for disaster monitoring and mitigation in the future to make society safer and more secure.

: pp. 424-432
GEONET as Infrastructure for Disaster Mitigation
Abstract
Hiromichi Tsuji and Yuki Hatanaka
: pp. 433-439
A GNSS Kinematic Analysis System for Japanese GEONET Stations
Abstract
Hiroshi Munekane
: pp. 440-452
Real-Time GNSS Analysis System REGARD: An Overview and Recent Results
Abstract
Satoshi Kawamoto, Naofumi Takamatsu, Satoshi Abe, Kohei Miyagawa, Yusaku Ohta, Masaru Todoriki, and Takuya Nishimura
: pp. 453-459
Role of Real-Time GNSS in Near-Field Tsunami Forecasting
Abstract
Yusaku Ohta, Takuya Inoue, Shunichi Koshimura, Satoshi Kawamoto, and Ryota Hino
: pp. 460-471
Development of GNSS Buoy for a Synthetic Geohazard Monitoring System
Abstract
Teruyuki Kato, Yukihiro Terada, Keiichi Tadokoro, Natsuki Kinugasa, Akira Futamura, Morio Toyoshima, Shin-ichi Yamamoto, Mamoru Ishii, Takuya Tsugawa, Michi Nishioka, Kenichi Takizawa, Yoshinori Shoji, and Hiromu Seko
: pp. 472-488
Onboard Realtime Processing of GPS-Acoustic Data for Moored Buoy-Based Observation
Abstract
Motoyuki Kido, Misae Imano, Yusaku Ohta, Tatsuya Fukuda, Narumi Takahashi, Satoshi Tsubone, Yasuhisa Ishihara, Hiroshi Ochi, Kentaro Imai, Chie Honsho, and Ryota Hino
: pp. 489-495
A Trial Application of Geodetic Data for Inland Fault Assessment – Coulomb Stress Changes Estimated from GNSS Surface Displacements
Abstract
Takuya Nishimura
: pp. 496-502
Postseismic Uplift Along the Pacific Coast of Tohoku and Kanto Districts Associated with the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
Takeshi Iinuma
: pp. 503-510
Current Status of Postseismic Deformation Following the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake
Abstract
Hisashi Suito
: pp. 511-517
Detection of Seafloor Movement in Subduction Zones Around Japan Using a GNSS-A Seafloor Geodetic Observation System from 2013 to 2016
Abstract
Tadashi Ishikawa and Yusuke Yokota
: pp. 518-525
Volcanic Activity of Sakurajima Monitored Using Global Navigation Satellite System
Abstract
Masato Iguchi
: pp. 526-534
GNSS Observation and Monitoring of the Hakone Volcano and the 2015 Unrest
Abstract
Ryosuke Doke, Masatake Harada, and Kazuki Miyaoka
: pp. 535-545
Total Electron Content Observations by Dense Regional and Worldwide International Networks of GNSS
Abstract
Takuya Tsugawa, Michi Nishioka, Mamoru Ishii, Kornyanat Hozumi, Susumu Saito, Atsuki Shinbori, Yuichi Otsuka, Akinori Saito, Suhaila M. Buhari, Mardina Abdullah, and Pornchai Supnithi

Regular Papers

: pp. 547-558
Response of the Tourism Industry to Volcanic Hazard Information: A Case Study of the Volcanic Warning at Zao Volcano in 2015
Abstract
Miwa Kuri, Amy Donovan, Anawat Suppasri, and Tetsuya Torayashiki
: pp. 559-563
Effects of Framing on Earthquake Risk Perception in Chiang Rai, Thailand
Abstract
Narongdej Intaratchaiyakit and Supot Teachavorasinskun
: pp. 564-570
A Commentary on “Recovery from Catastrophe and Building Back Better (Takeuchi and Tanaka, 2016)” – Structure of Damage of Production Capital Stock on Normative Economic Process
Abstract
Muneta Yokomatsu
: pp. 571-573
Response to Discussion by Muneta Yokomatsu on Kuniyoshi Takeuchi and Shigenobu Tanaka: Recovery from Catastrophe and Building Back Better, JDR Vol.11 No.6, pp. 1190-1201, Dec. 2016
Abstract
Kuniyoshi Takeuchi and Shigenobu Tanaka

No.2

(Mar)

The Third JDR Award
Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 3

The Third JDR Award

: p. 229
Congratulations! The Third JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
: p. 230
Presenting the Third JDR Award
Haruo Hayashi
: p. 231
Message from the Winner
Shunichi Koshimura

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 3

: p. 233
Disaster and Big Data Part 3
Shunichi Koshimura

The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster left behind many lessons to learn, and there have since been many new findings and insights that have led to suggestions made and implemented in disaster observation, sensing, simulation, and damage determination. The challenges for mitigating the damage from future catastrophic natural disasters, such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Earthquake or the Nankai Trough Earthquake and Tsunami, are in how we share our visions of the possible impacts, how we prepare to mitigate the losses and damages, and how we enhance society’s disaster resilience.

The huge amount of information obtained, called “disaster big data,” is related to the dynamic movement, as IoT, of a large number people, vehicles, and goods from inside and outside the affected areas. This has dramatically facilitated our understanding of how our society has responded to unprecedented catastrophes. The key question is how to utilize big data in establishing social systems that respond promptly, sensibly, and effectively to natural disasters, and in withstanding adversity with resilience.

Researchers with various types of expertise are working together under a collaborative project called JST CREST “Establishing the advanced disaster reduction management system by fusion of real-time disaster simulation and big data assimilation.” The project aims to identify possible earthquake and tsunami disaster scenarios that occur and progress in a chained or compound manner and to create new technologies to lead responses and disaster mitigation measures to help society to recover from disasters.

As we have published two previous special issues entitled “Disaster and Big Data” since 2016, this issue is our third. Included are 14 papers that aim to share the recent progress of the project as the sequel to Part 2, published in March 2017. As one of the guest editors of this issue, I would like to express our deep gratitude for the insightful comments and suggestions made by the reviewers and the members of the editorial committee. I do hope that this work will be utilized in disaster management efforts to mitigate the damage and losses in future catastrophic disasters.

: pp. 234-244
A Real-Time Tsunami Inundation Forecast System Using Vector Supercomputer SX-ACE
Abstract
Akihiro Musa, Takashi Abe, Takuya Inoue, Hiroaki Hokari, Yoichi Murashima , Yoshiyuki Kido, Susumu Date, Shinji Shimojo, Shunichi Koshimura, and Hiroaki Kobayashi
: pp. 245-253
Selection of Tsunami Observation Points Suitable for Database-Driven Prediction
Abstract
Junichi Taniguchi, Kyohei Tagawa, Masashi Yoshikawa, Yasuhiko Igarashi, Tsuneo Ohsumi, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Takane Hori, Masato Okada, and Toshitaka Baba
: pp. 254-261
Cluster Analysis of Long-Period Ground-Motion Simulation Data with Application to Nankai Trough Megathrust Earthquake Scenarios
Abstract
Takahiro Maeda, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Toshihiko Hayakawa, Satsuki Shimono, and Sho Akagi
: pp. 262-271
Assessment of Street Network Accessibility in Tokyo Metropolitan Area After a Large Earthquake
Abstract
Toshihiro Osaragi, Maki Kishimoto, and Takuya Oki
: pp. 272-280
Effects of Firefighting Activities Performed by Local Residents to Mitigate Fire Destruction Damage and Human Casualties in Large Earthquakes
Abstract
Takuya Oki and Toshihiro Osaragi
: pp. 281-290
Extraction of Collapsed Bridges Due to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake from Post-Event SAR Images
Abstract
Wen Liu and Fumio Yamazaki
: pp. 291-302
Identifying Building Damage Patterns in the 2016 Meinong, Taiwan Earthquake Using Post-Event Dual-Polarimetric ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Imagery
Abstract
Yanbing Bai, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 303-312
Detection of Pedestrian Flow Using Mobile Devices for Evacuation Guiding in Disaster
Abstract
Tomoya Kitazato, Miku Hoshino, Masaki Ito, and Kaoru Sezaki
: pp. 313-320
Development and Evaluation of a Search Support Portal for Public Videos Related to the Great East Japan Earthquake: “3.11 Video Portal – Great East Japan Earthquake Public Footage Finder”
Abstract
Shosuke Sato, Toru Okamoto, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 321-325
An Analysis of Web Coverage on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake Disaster
Abstract
Shosuke Sato, Fumihiko Imamura, and Masahiro Iwasaki
: pp. 326-337
State-Space Model for Traffic State Estimation of a Two-Dimensional Network
Abstract
Yosuke Kawasaki, Yusuke Hara, and Masao Kuwahara
: pp. 338-346
An Analysis Technique of Evacuation Simulation Using an Array DBMS
Abstract
Yusuke Kawai, Jing Zhao, Kento Sugiura, Yoshiharu Ishikawa, and Yukiko Wakita
: pp. 347-357
Hybrid System for Generating Data on Human Flow in a Tsunami Disaster
Abstract
Takehiro Kashiyama, Yoshihide Sekimoto, Masao Kuwahara, Takuma Mitani, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 358-366
Comparative Analysis of Mobile Space Statistics Data and Questionnaire Survey Data to Detect Tsunami Evacuation Behavior: Case of Fukushima Earthquake Tsunami in Ishinomaki City and Watari Town, Miyagi Prefecture
Abstract
Naoki Togawa, Shosuke Sato, and Fumihiko Imamura

Regular Papers

: pp. 367-379
Study on Disaster Emergency Provisions in the Constitution of Japan as a Measure Against Huge Disasters – A Discussion Based on Initial and Emergency Responses to the Great East Japan Earthquake (Earthquake and Tsunami) –
Abstract
Akira Kotaki and Fumio Takeda
: pp. 380-386
Development of GIS Integrated Big Data Research Toolbox (BigGIS-RTX) for Mobile CDR Data Processing in Disasters Management
Abstract
Ko Ko Lwin, Yoshihide Sekimoto, and Wataru Takeuchi
: pp. 387-395
Using Agent Simulations to Evaluate the Effect of a Regional BCP on Disaster Response
Abstract
Zijian Liu and Takeyasu Suzuki
: pp. 396-409
Hydrological Simulation of Small River Basins in Northern Kyushu, Japan, During the Extreme Rainfall Event of July 5–6, 2017
Abstract
Shakti P. C., Tsuyoshi Nakatani, and Ryohei Misumi

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project: Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project: Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform

: p. 5
SATREPS Myanmar Project: Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform
Kimiro Meguro and Gokon Hideomi

This special issue summarizes the main results of the first half of the five-year SATREPS project in Myanmar. SATREPS stands for “Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development” and it is supported by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). The title of our project is “Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform.” Ours is the first SATREPS project in Myanmar and Yangon Technological University (YTU) is our main counterpart institute and relevant organizations mainly national and local governments are collaborating as strategic partners.

In Myanmar, rural and urban development has been progressing rapidly and on a large scale, and the expansion of urban population coupled with climate change has increased the risk of disaster to a critical level, especially in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city. By monitoring changes in the urban environment, such as the topography, ground, buildings, and infrastructure, we seek to lower the level of risk. Our project will improve the disaster management system, plan and response capability, based on an evaluation of disaster vulnerabilities. Considering floods including tidal wave problems and earthquakes as the target hazards, we aim to contribute to the development of precise regional development plans and disaster management measures by identifying disaster risks in advance, and we will support the Myanmar government in strengthening its disaster response capabilities.

We plan to set up a system by which industry, academia, and the government collaborate to promote the understanding of research content, to continue research activities, and to implement research results in Myanmar. We hope that our activities in the SATREPS project will become an ideal model for solving issues in urban development and disaster management, and that the project will also contribute the other Asian countries.

: pp. 6-13
Estimation of Originating-Destination Trips in Yangon by Using Big Data Source
Abstract
Thein Aye Zin, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
: pp. 14-21
Flood Hazard Assessment of Bago River Basin, Myanmar
Abstract
Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Wataru Takeuchi, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Kyaw Zaya Htun, Thet Hnin Aye, and Shelly Win
: pp. 22-30
Preliminary Assessment of GPM Satellite Rainfall over Myanmar
Abstract
Muhammad Mohsan, Ralph Allen Acierto, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Win Win Zin
: pp. 31-39
Development of Fragility Functions of RC Buildings in Yangon City Using Push over Analysis
Abstract
Chaitanya Krishna Gadagamma, Aung Ko Min, Hideomi Gokon, Kimiro Meguro, and Khin Than Yu
: pp. 40-49
Structure Deformation Measurement with Terrestrial Laser Scanner at Pathein Bridge in Myanmar
Abstract
Nuntikorn Kitratporn, Wataru Takeuchi, Koji Matsumoto, and Kohei Nagai
: pp. 50-61
Land Cover Change Simulations in Yangon Under Several Scenarios of Flood and Earthquake Vulnerabilities with Master Plan
Abstract
Tanakorn Sritarapipat and Wataru Takeuchi
: pp. 62-69
A Comparison of Disaster Management Plans for Both Japan and Myanmar
Abstract
Rena Kikuchi, Muneyoshi Numada, May Myat Mon, Tun Naing, Khin Than Yu, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 70-79
Data Communication for Efficient Water Resource Management Among Multiple Stakeholders – A Case Study in the Bago River Basin, Myanmar –
Abstract
Naruhiko Shirai, Seemanta Sharma Bhagabati, Akira Kodaka, Naohiko Kohtake, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Ralph Allen Acierto, and Win Win Zin
: pp. 80-87
A Simple Monitoring System for Damaged Bridges in Myanmar
Abstract
Liyanto Eddy, Takeshi Miyashita, Koji Matsumoto, Kohei Nagai, and Win Bo
: pp. 88-98
Technology Transfer for Safe and Sustainable Road Bridge Life Cycle Management in Myanmar
Abstract
Michael Henry, Chika Yamasaki, Kohei Nagai, Koji Matsumoto, and Hiroshi Yokota
: pp. 99-115
Analysis of Disaster Response During Landslide Disaster in Hakha, Chin State of Myanmar
Abstract
May Myat Mon, Tun Naing, Muneyoshi Numada, Khin Than Yu, Kimiro Meguro, and Kyaw Zin Latt
: pp. 116-124
Development of a Hydrological Telemetry System in Bago River
Abstract
Ralph Allen Acierto, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Win Win Zin, Aung Than Oo, Khon Ra, and Daisuke Komori
: pp. 125-137
Understanding Regional Building Characteristics in Yangon Based on Digital Building Model
Abstract
Osamu Murao, Takuma Usuda, Hideomi Gokon, Kimiro Meguro, Wataru Takeuchi, Kazuya Sugiyasu, and Khin Than Yu
: pp. 138-151
Response-Capacity Analysis of Urban Systems to Support Emergency and Disaster Response in a Developing City: The Case of Yangon, Myanmar
Abstract
Yasmin Bhattacharya, Takaaki Kato, Tomoko Matsushita, Ei Ei Tun, and Tin Tin Aye

Regular Papers

: pp. 153-167
Seismic Hazard in Syria Based on Completeness Analysis and Assessment
Abstract
Ahmed Alhourani, Junji Kiyono, Aiko Furukawa, and Hussam Eldein Zaineh
: pp. 168-176
Self-Extensional Space in Relocated Housing After 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami: Case Study of Namkem Community, PhangNga, Thailand
Abstract
Titaya Sararit
: pp. 177-192
Study on Disaster Prevention Countermeasures and Examples for Local Governments in Consideration of Regional Characteristics
Abstract
Shinya Miura, Hiroaki Sano, Nobuyuki Handa, Tai-Young Yi, Hitoshi Taguchi, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 193-198
3-D Gravity Basement Structure Around Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan
Abstract
Shun Araki, Tatsuya Noguchi, Masao Komazawa, Shoya Arimura, Mitsuhiro Tamura, Kei Nakayama, Hitoshi Morikawa, Takashi Miyamoto, Kahori Iiyama, Yoshiya Hata, Masayuki Yoshimi, Takao Kagawa, and Hiroyuki Goto
: pp. 199-204
Change in Disaster-Prevention Consciousness Brought by Serious Damage from a Large Scale Disaster: Studying the Kumamoto Earthquake in 2016
Abstract
Miki Ozeki and Kan Shimazaki
: pp. 205-215
Study on the Mechanism of the Peculiar Behaviors of the Aratozawa Dam During the 2008 Earthquake
Abstract
Nario Yasuda, Norihisa Matsumoto, and Zengyan Cao

Vol.12 (2017)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Communicating Hazard and Risk: From Scientific Information to Community Involvement

Special Issue on Communicating Hazard and Risk: From Scientific Information to Community Involvement

: p. 1097
Communicating Hazard and Risk: From Scientific Information to Community Involvement
Naoshi Hirata, Reo Kimura, and Shoji Ohtomo

Hazard and risk researchers are using their research results to target several vastly different stakeholders: the scientific community, governmental institutions, engineers and the larger technical community, companies, and finally the local residents. Each of these groups has a different focus on the results and is drawing different conclusions from them. In this special issue for the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), we address the problems surrounding hazard and risk communication by asking important questions. How can we communicate hazard and/or risk to the public? How can we involve communities in risk assessment? How can we raise the acceptance of risk models in communities? How can communities be involved in mitigation measures? Finally, how can we explain the inherit uncertainties of hazard and risk assessments? To answer these questions, it is essential to integrate knowledge from the social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering.

As the first step in this effort, we selected seven papers in the present special issue: six are related to the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes in Japan and one to a research in Taiwan. They include studies on hazard and risk estimates before the disaster, risk communication during the earthquake sequence by the Japan Metrological Agency, the psychological and behavioral characteristics of disaster victims, resident evacuation patterns, the recovery process, and risk communication in disaster. The paper of the research in Taiwan addresses the importance of resident involvement to earthquake science for disaster preparedness.

: pp. 1098-1108
Has 20 Years of Japanese Earthquake Research Enhanced Seismic Disaster Resilience in Kumamoto?
Abstract
Naoshi Hirata
: pp. 1109-1116
New Japanese Guidelines for the Information of the Prospect of Seismic Activity After Large Earthquakes and Their Applications
Abstract
Noriko Kamaya, Kiyoshi Takeda, and Tetsuo Hashimoto
: pp. 1117-1138
A Study on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake: Citizen’s Evaluation of Earthquake Information and Their Evacuation and Sheltering Behaviors
Abstract
Reo Kimura, Shoji Ohtomo, and Naoshi Hirata
: pp. 1139-1150
The Influences of Residents’ Evacuation Patterns in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake on Public Risk Perceptions and Trust Toward Authorities
Abstract
Shoji Ohtomo, Reo Kimura, and Naoshi Hirata
: pp. 1151-1160
The Importance of Seismic Death Risk Assessment of Households in the Kumamoto Earthquake of 2016
Abstract
Tadayoshi Nakashima, Shigeyuki Okada, and Akane Shinoda
: pp. 1161-1173
Time-Series Analysis of Workload for Support in Rebuilding Disaster Victims’ Lives – Comparison of the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake with the 2007 Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake –
Abstract
Munenari Inoguchi, Keiko Tamura, Haruo Hayashi, and Keisuke Shimizu
: pp. 1174-1181
Citizen Earthquake Science in Taiwan: From Science to Hazard Mitigation
Abstract
Wen-Tzong Liang, Jian-Cheng Lee, Kate Huihsuan Chen, and Nai-Chi Hsiao

Regular Papers

: pp. 1182-1191
Control Change Cause Analysis-Based Fault Diagnostic Approach
Abstract
Gang-Gang Wu, Zong-Xiao Yang, Gen-Sheng Li, and Lei Song
: pp. 1192-1202
Participatory Multi-Stakeholder Platforms in Disaster Management in South Africa
Abstract
Nosiphiwe P. Ngqwala, C. Sunitha Srinivas, Roman Tandlich, Desmond M. Pyle, and Rene Oosthuizen
: pp. 1203-1214
Role of JPF in the Support of Disaster Victims of the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake: Challenges Faced
Abstract
Ayako Yachida
: pp. 1215-1225
Duration of Strong Motion Exceeding Bridge Design Spectra in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Nobuoto Nojima and Taiki Yamamoto

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Researches on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2017
Mini Special Issue on Cyber Security

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Researches on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2017

: p. 843
NIED Frontier Researches on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2017
Haruo Hayashi and Yuichiro Usuda

In April 2016, our institute, NIED, under its new English name the “National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience,” commenced its fourth mid-to-long term planning period, set to last seven years.

We are constantly required to carry out comprehensive efforts, including observations, forecasts, experiments, assessments, and countermeasures related to a variety of natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, landslides, heavy rains, blizzards, and ice storms.

Since this is NIED’s first special issue for the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), works were collected on a wide variety of topics from research divisions and centers as well as from ongoing projects in order to give an overview of the latest achievements of the institute. We are delighted to present 17 papers on five topics: seismic disasters, volcanic disasters, climatic disasters, landslide disasters, and the development of comprehensive Information Communications Technology (ICT) for disaster management. Even though the achievements detailed in these papers are certainly the results individual research, NIED hopes to maximize these achievements for the promotion of science and technology for disaster risk reduction and resilience as a whole. It is our hope that this special issue awakens the readers’ interest in a study, and, of course, creates an opportunity for further collaborative works with us.

: pp. 844-857
Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure Beneath Japanese Islands and Surroundings Based on NIED Seismic Networks Using both Inland and Offshore Events
Abstract
Makoto Matsubara, Hiroshi Sato, Kenji Uehira, Masashi Mochizuki, and Toshihiko Kanazawa
: pp. 858-867
Study on Performance Evaluation of MEMS Sensors and Data Integration Methods for Expected Use to Determine Damage Degrees of Existing Structures
Abstract
Tomohiro Sasaki, Koichi Kajiwara, Takuzo Yamashita, and Takuya Toyoshi
: pp. 868-881
Large-Scale Shake Table Test on Behavior of Underground Structure with the Curved Portion During an Earthquake
Abstract
Yohsuke Kawamata, Manabu Nakayama, Ikuo Towhata, and Susumu Yasuda
: pp. 882-890
Development of a Virtual Reality Experience System for Interior Damage Due to an Earthquake – Utilizing E-Defense Shake Table Test –
Abstract
Takuzo Yamashita, Mahendra Kumar Pal, Kazutoshi Matsuzaki, and Hiromitsu Tomozawa
: pp. 891-898
Investigation of Offshore Fault Modeling for a Source Region Related to the Shakotan-Oki Earthquake
Abstract
Tsuneo Ohsumi and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 899-915
Investigation of Damages in Immediate Vicinity of Co-Seismic Faults During the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Shohei Naito, Ken Xiansheng Hao, Shigeki Senna, Takuma Saeki, Hiromitsu Nakamura, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, and Takashi Azuma
: pp. 916-925
Differences Between Scientific Prediction and Subjective Expectation of Focal Region and Seismic Intensity of Nankai Trough Giant Earthquake
Abstract
Kan Shimazaki and Yoshinobu Mizui
: pp. 926-931
NIED’s V-net, the Fundamental Volcano Observation Network in Japan
Abstract
Toshikazu Tanada, Hideki Ueda, Masashi Nagai, and Motoo Ukawa
: pp. 932-943
Relationship Between b-Value Distribution and the Magma Plumbing System in and Around Mt. Tarumae, Japan
Abstract
Keita Chiba, Hideki Ueda, and Toshikazu Tanada
: pp. 944-955
Assimilation Impact of Different GPS Analysis Methods on Precipitation Forecast: A Heavy Rainfall Case Study of Kani City, Gifu Prefecture on July 15, 2010
Abstract
Shingo Shimizu, Seiichi Shimada, and Kazuhisa Tsuboki
: pp. 956-966
Analysis of the 6 September 2015 Tornadic Storm Around the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Using Coupled 3DVAR and Incremental Analysis Updates
Abstract
Ken-ichi Shimose, Shingo Shimizu, Ryohei Kato, and Koyuru Iwanami
: pp. 967-979
Very Short Time Range Forecasting Using CReSS-3DVAR for a Meso-γ-Scale, Localized, Extremely Heavy Rainfall Event: Comparison with an Extrapolation-Based Nowcast
Abstract
Ryohei Kato, Shingo Shimizu, Ken-ichi Shimose, and Koyuru Iwanami
: pp. 980-992
Real-Time Prediction Method for Slope Failure Caused by Rainfall Using Slope Monitoring Records
Abstract
Tomohiro Ishizawa, Toru Danjo, and Naoki Sakai
: pp. 993-1001
Characteristics of Groundwater Response to Precipitation for Landslide Prevention at Kiyomizu-Dera
Abstract
Toru Danjo, Tomohiro Ishizawa, Masamitsu Fujimoto, Naoki Sakai, and Ryoichi Fukagawa
: pp. 1002-1014
Effects and Issues of Information Sharing System for Disaster Response
Abstract
Yuichiro Usuda, Makoto Hanashima, Ryota Sato, and Hiroaki Sano
: pp. 1015-1027
The Standardized Disaster-Information Products for Disaster Management: Concept and Formulation
Abstract
Makoto Hanashima, Ryota Sato, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 1028-1038
Consideration on Utilization of Information in Disaster Response Site – Based on Information Support for 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes –
Abstract
Tadashi Ise, Takuya Takahashi, Ryota Sato, Hiroaki Sano, Takeshi Isono, Makoto Hanashima, and Yuichiro Usuda

Mini Special Issue on Cyber Security

: p. 1039
Cyber Security
Kenji Watanabe

As our daily lives and socioeconomic activities have increasingly come to depend on information systems and networks, the impact of disruptions to these systems and networks have also become more complex and diversified.

In urban areas, where people, goods, money, and information are highly concentrated, the possibility of chain failures and confusion beyond our expectations and experience is especially high.

The vulnerabilities in our systems and networks on have become the targets of cyber attacks, which have come to cause socioeconomic problems with increasing likelihood. To counter these attacks, technological countermeasures alone are insufficient, and countermeasures such as the development of professional skills and organizational response capabilities as well as the implementation of cyber security schemes based on public-private partnerships (PPP) at the national level must be carried out as soon as possible.

In this JDR mini special issue on Cyber Security, I have tried to expand the scope of traditional cyber security discussions with mainly technological aspects. I have also succeeded in including non-technological aspects to provide feasible measures that will help us to prepare for, respond to, and recover from socioeconomic damage caused by advancing cyber attacks.

Finally, I am truly grateful for the authors’ insightful contributions and the referees’ acute professional advice, which together make this JDR mini special issue a valuable contribution to making our society more resilient to incoming cyber attacks.

: pp. 1040-1049
Proposal for a Risk Communication-Based Approach to IT Risk
Abstract
Ryoichi Sasaki
: pp. 1050-1059
Proposal on Measure Against Cyberattack on the Basis of Recent Trend
Abstract
Naoshi Sato
: pp. 1060-1072
Improvement of Verification of a Model Supporting Decision-Making on Information Security Risk Treatment by Using Statistical Data
Abstract
Ritsuko Aiba and Takeshi Hiromatsu
: pp. 1073-1080
Study on High Resilient Structures for IoT Systems to Detect Accidents
Abstract
Hideyuki Shintani, Tomomi Aoyama, and Ichiro Koshijima
: pp. 1081-1090
On the Complexity of Cybersecurity Exercises Proportional to Preparedness
Abstract
Tomomi Aoyama, Toshihiko Nakano, Ichiro Koshijima, Yoshihiro Hashimoto, and Kenji Watanabe

No.sp

(Jun)

Special Issue on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes

Special Issue on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes

: p. 645
the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes
Haruo Hayashi

At 9:26 pm on April 14, 2016, a magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck directly beneath Kumamoto prefecture, Japan, producing a seismic intensity level (JMA) of 7 in Mashiki Town. Although the earthquake damage forecasting system in operation at the time predicted that this earthquake would cause no damage, it resulted in extensive human casualties and property damage centered in Mashiki Town. Past midnight on April 16, 28 hours after the first shock, the second and main shock hit, which recorded magnitude 7.3 and was the strongest recorded urban earthquake in Japan since 1995. The hypocenter extended from Kumamoto prefecture to Oita prefecture, cutting across the island of Kyushu. Mount Aso also saw increased volcanic activities which led to several landslides. This resulted in the collapse of the Great Aso Bridge, an important transportation point, causing the loss of human lives as well as obstruction of traffic for an extended period. Much confusion arose in the process of implementing measures in response to the earthquakes, which produced damage in urban areas as well as hilly and mountainous regions, raising many issues and prompting several new approaches.

Researchers in many fields have conducted various activities at the disaster sites in the one-year period following the earthquakes, and produced significant findings in many areas. In order to make these results available to the wider global community, JDR is releasing a special issue on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes with excellent papers and reports to mark their one-year anniversary. While the submitted papers to this special issue went through our regular peer review process, no publication charge was imposed so as to encourage as many submissions as possible.

It is our hope that this special issue will contribute to throwing light on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes in its entirety.

: pp. 646-655
Machine Learning Based Building Damage Mapping from the ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 SAR Imagery: Case Study of 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Yanbing Bai, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 656-668
Simple Estimation Method for the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake’s Direct Damage Amount
Abstract
Qinglin Cui, Mingji Cui, Toshihisa Toyoda, and Hitoshi Taniguchi
: pp. 669-677
The Evacuation of Thai Citizens During Japan’s 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes: An ICT Perspective
Abstract
Natt Leelawat, Anawat Suppasri, Panon Latcharote and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 678-687
Emergency Evacuation and Shelter-Seeking Behavior of Foreign Residents in Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Zi Yang, Keiko Inagaki, Hiromitsu Yagi, Satoshi Yoshida, and Satoru Sadohara
: pp. 688-695
Damage of Enterprises and Their Business Continuity in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Hiroaki Maruya and Tetsuya Torayashiki
: pp. 696-707
Construction of Participatory Surveying System for Specialists and Utilization of Geoportal
Abstract
Yuki Okajima, Yasuhiro Mitani, Hiro Ikemi, and Ibrahim Djamaluddin

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Resilience Science and Resilience Engineering to Enhance Resilience in Shikoku Region of Japan

Special Issue on Resilience Science and Resilience Engineering to Enhance Resilience in Shikoku Region of Japan

: p. 711
Resilience Science and Resilience Engineering to Enhance Resilience in Shikoku Region of Japan
Yoshiyuki Kaneda and Chikako Isouchi

Japan has one of the highest levels of seismicity in the world. In the last few decades, Japan has been the site of many destructive earthquakes, such as the 1995 Kobe earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, 2004 Chuetsu earthquake, 2007 Chuetsu-oki earthquake, and 2016 Kumamoto earthquake/Tottori-chubu earthquakes.

Furthermore, we need to take disaster mitigation countermeasures in preparation for the next Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake, Tokyo earthquake, etc. Disaster countermeasures against these earthquakes will be of vital importance to Japanese society in the future.

As a specific example, if and when the next Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake strikes, it will cause widespread and compound disasters on the island of Shikoku and in southwestern Japan in general. The prefectures of Kagawa, Tokushima, Kochi, and Ehime are all on the island of Shikoku, yet the damages that a future Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake will cause are predicted to be quite different in each prefecture. Therefore, in preparing disaster mitigation strategies for the coming Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake, these four prefectures and the distinguished universities involved in disaster mitigation research and education in them must be united in collaboration while making the best use of the individual characteristics of the prefectures and universities.

Specifically, in terms of disaster mitigation preparations, universities on Shikoku have to develop and advance resilience science as it relates to upcoming disasters from a Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake, inland earthquakes, typhoons, floods, etc.

In this special issue, many significant research papers from the fields of engineering, geoscience, and the social sciences by researchers from distinguished universities on the island of Shikoku focus on resilience science. We must apply their findings to society, putting them into practice to mitigate potential damages from any future natural events.

: pp. 712-721
Resilience Science for a Resilience Society in Seismogenic and Tsunamigenic Countries
Abstract
Yoshiyuki Kaneda
: pp. 722-732
A Proposed Restoration Strategy for Road Networks After an Earthquake Disaster Using Resilience Engineering
Abstract
Wataru Shiraki, Kyosuke Takahashi, Hitoshi Inomo, and Chikako Isouchi
: pp. 733-740
District Continuity Plans for Large-Scale Disaster Coordination: Case Study in Kagawa District
Abstract
Chikako Isouchi
: pp. 741-747
Preliminary Study on Long-Term Flooding After the Tsunami
Abstract
Toshitaka Baba, Junichi Taniguchi, Noriko Kusunoki, Manabu Miyoshi, and Hiroshi Aki
: pp. 748-754
An Analytical Study on Intentions of Disaster Prevention Expert Candidates
Abstract
Toru Futagami, Tsuyoshi Hatori, and Netra P. Bhandary
: pp. 755-765
Resilience Efforts in the Kochi Prefecture in Preparation for the Nankai Trough Earthquake
Abstract
Tadashi Hara
: pp. 766-774
Real-Time Tsunami Prediction System Using DONET
Abstract
Narumi Takahashi, Kentaro Imai, Masanobu Ishibashi, Kentaro Sueki, Ryoko Obayashi, Tatsuo Tanabe, Fumiyasu Tamazawa, Toshitaka Baba, and Yoshiyuki Kaneda
: pp. 775-781
Earthquake and Tsunami Scenarios as Basic Information to Prepare Next Nankai Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
Takane Hori
: pp. 782-791
Experience-Based Training in Earthquake Evacuation for School Teachers
Abstract
Kyosuke Takahashi, Hitoshi Inomo, Wataru Shiraki, Chikako Isouchi, and Mari Takahashi

Regular Papers

: pp. 793-805
A Study on Flood Forecasting in the Upper Indus Basin Considering Snow and Glacier Meltwater
Abstract
Tong Liu, Morimasa Tsuda, and Yoichi Iwami
: pp. 806-810
Area Business Continuity Management Approach to Build Sustainable Communities
Abstract
Takahiro Ono and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 811-821
Contribution of Corporate Social Responsibility to Post-Disaster Life Recovery of Employees
Abstract
Maki Dan and Masayuki Kohiyama

No.3

(Jun)

Message from Editors-in-Chief
Special Issue on Infrastructure Maintenance, Renovation and Management

Message from Editors-in-Chief

: p. 393
Message from Editors-in-Chief
Haruo Hayashi

Special Issue on Infrastructure Maintenance, Renovation and Management

: pp. 394-395
Infrastructure Maintenance, Renovation and Management
Kazuo Kyuma, Yozo Fujino, and Kohei Nagai

Building a sustainable economy is one of Japan’s most pressing issues today, and the only path forward is through innovations in science and technology. Under the leadership of the Prime Minister and the Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, the Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (CSTI) has taken a high-altitude look across Japan’s ministries, proposing a comprehensive policy for science, technology, and innovation. As part of this policy, the SIP program has been designed as a fast-track research and development project, encompassing basic research, practical adoption, and commercialization. This nationally-sponsored program for science and technology innovation crosses the traditional framework of Japan’s ministries and agencies, as well as the traditional boundaries of scientific disciplines. The SIP has identified 11 issues from the field of energy, next-generation infrastructure and regional resources in order to address social issues, revitalize the Japanese economy, and bolstering Japan’s industrial posture in the world. As one of eleven themes, a new R&D program named “Infrastructure maintenance, renovation and management” was launched in 2014. The new R&D program is a 5-years program covering various subjects with key technologies such as non-destructive testing, monitoring, robotics, long-term performance prediction, development of high-quality durable material for repair and replacement, and infrastructure management using advanced information and communication technologies (ICT). The program consists of 60 research projects involving universities, research institutes and industries. This initiative is expected to prevent further accidents and setting an example for efficient infrastructure maintenance by reducing the burden of maintenance works and costs. This special issue aims at introducing some of the activities of the ongoing SIP “Infrastructure maintenance, renovation and management.” We are delighted to see publication of twenty-one technical papers/reports on this theme. We hope that readers would find this special issue interesting and valuable; and we greatly appreciate the authors for their contributions.

: pp. 396-405
Long-Term Monitoring for ASR-Deteriorated PC Rigid-Frame Bridge
Abstract
Saiji Fukada, Minh Tuan Ha, Kazuyuki Torii, Makoto Tsuda, Shuzo Ura, and Teruhiko Sasatani
: pp. 406-414
Verification of Structural Performance of a Main Tower Inclined Suspension Bridge by Simple Monitoring and FE Analysis
Abstract
Carlos Arturo Liñan Panting, Kohei Nagai, Eiji Iwasaki, and Thein Nu
: pp. 415-421
Bridge Slab Damage Detection by Signal Processing of UHF-Band Ground Penetrating Radar Data
Abstract
Tsukasa Mizutani, Nagisa Nakamura, Takahiro Yamaguchi, Minoru Tarumi, Yusuke Ando, and Ikuo Hara
: pp. 422-431
Data Assimilation for Fatigue Life Assessment of RC Bridge Decks Coupled with Path-Integral-Mechanistic Model and Non-Destructive Inspection
Abstract
Yasushi Tanaka, Koichi Maekawa, Takuya Maeshima, Ichiro Iwaki, Takahiro Nishida, and Tomoki Shiotani
: pp. 432-445
Development of a Remotely Controlled Semi-Underwater Heavy Carrier Robot for Unmanned Construction Works
Abstract
Shin’ichi Yuta
: pp. 446-455
Vehicle Model Calibration in the Frequency Domain and its Application to Large-Scale IRI Estimation
Abstract
Boyu Zhao, Tomonori Nagayama, Masashi Toyoda, Noritoshi Makihata, Muneaki Takahashi, and Masataka Ieiri
: pp. 456-469
Improvement of Durability of Precast Concrete Member by Granulated Blast Furnace Slag Sand
Abstract
Toshiki Ayano, Takashi Fujii, Kyoji Niitani, Katsunori Takahashi, and Kazuyoshi Hosotani
: pp. 470-477
Wave-Guided Acoustic Emission Signals of Concrete Slab Obtained by Fatigue Testing on Wheel-Load Machine
Abstract
Mitsuharu Shiwa, Zhengwang Li, Takuya Maeshima, Yasuhiro Koda, and Yasushi Tanaka
: pp. 478-486
Influence of Corrosion Distribution on Estimation of Flexural Loading Capacity of Corroded RC Beams
Abstract
Takashi Yamamoto, Satoshi Takaya, and Toyo Miyagawa
: pp. 487-495
Evolution of Fatigue Damage in Wheel-Loading Tests Evaluated by 3D Elastic-Wave Tomography
Abstract
Tomoki Shiotani Hisafumi Asaue, Takahiro Nishida, Takuya Maeshima, and Yasushi Tanaka
: pp. 496-505
Application of Elastic-Wave Tomography to Repair Inspection in Deteriorated Concrete Structures
Abstract
Katsufumi Hashimoto, Tomoki Shiotani, Takahiro Nishida, and Toyoaki Miyagawa
: pp. 506-514
Mechanoluminescent Testing as an Efficient Inspection Technique for the Management of Infrastructures
Abstract
Akihito Yoshida, Linsheng Liu, Dong Tu, Shigenobu Kainuma, and Chao-Nan Xu
: pp. 526-535
Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry for Disaster Monitoring of Harbor Facilities
Abstract
Ryo Natsuaki, Takuma Anahara, Tsuyoshi Kotoura, Yuudai Iwatsuka, Naoya Tomii, Hiroyuki Katayama, and Takeshi Nishihata
: pp. 536-545
Highly-Sensitive Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System for Remote Monitoring of Concrete Structures
Abstract
Kazuhiro Tsuno, Yutaka Akahori, Toshiya Yui, Hiromitsu Furukawa, Anri Watanabe, Makoto Fujimaki, Masanori Oto, Tsukuru Katsuyama, Yasuhiro Iguchi, Hiroshi Inada, and Hiroshi Minagawa
: pp. 546-556
High Spatial Resolution Survey Using Frequency-Shifted Feedback Laser for Transport Infrastructure Maintenance
Abstract
Takeharu Murakami, Norihito Saito, Yuichi Komachi, Kotaro Okamura, Takashi Michikawa, Michio Sakashita, Shigeru Kogure, Kiwamu Kase, Satoshi Wada, and Katsumi Midorikawa
: pp. 557-568
Water Leakage Detection System for Underground Pipes by Using Wireless Sensors and Machine Learning
Abstract
Shigeru Teruhi, Yo Yamaguchi, and Junichi Akahani
: pp. 569-577
A Planning Model for Optimal Deployment of Leak Sensors in a Water Pipeline Network
Abstract
Yasuhiro Arai, Akira Koizumi, Toyono Inakazu, and Wako Kawamura
: pp. 578-584
On-Site Non-Destructive Inspection of Bridges Using the 950 keV X-Band Electron Linac X-ray Source
Abstract
Mitsuru Uesaka, Yuki Mitsuya, Eiko Hashimoto, Katsuhiro Dobashi, Ryota Yano, Hiroaki Takeuchi, Jean-Michel Bereder, Joichi Kusano, Eiji Tanabe, Natsuyo Maruyama, Yukiya Hattori, Masahiro Tatewaka, Hironobu Ono, Kentaro Murata, Atsushi Koishikawa, Futoshi Kaibuki, Hideo Sakurai, Yoshichika Seki , Yoshinobu Oshima, and Masahiro Ishida
: pp. 585-592
Research and Development of a Non-Destructive Inspection Technique with a Compact Neutron Source
Abstract
Yoshie Otake, Yoshichika Seki, Yasuo Wakabayashi, Yoshimasa Ikeda, Takao Hashiguchi, Yuichi Yoshimura, Hideyuki Sunaga, Atsushi Taketani, Maki Mizuta, Yoshinobu Oshima, and Masahiro Ishida
: pp. 593-606
Development of a Bridge Inspection Support System Using Two-Wheeled Multicopter and 3D Modeling Technology
Abstract
Yoshiro Hada, Manabu Nakao, Moyuru Yamada, Hiroki Kobayashi, Naoyuki Sawasaki, Katsunori Yokoji, Satoshi Kanai, Fumiki Tanaka, Hiroaki Date, Sarthak Pathak, Atsushi Yamashita, Manabu Yamada, and Toshiya Sugawara

Regular Papers

: pp. 607-616
Sensitivity Analysis of Depth-Integrated Numerical Models for Estimating Landslide Movement
Abstract
Teuku Faisal Fathani, Djoko Legono, and Muhammad Ahnaf Alfath
: pp. 617-630
Assessment of Sedimentation in Wlingi and Lodoyo Reservoirs: A Secondary Disaster Following the 2014 Eruption of Mt. Kelud, Indonesia
Abstract
Fahmi Hidayat, Pitojo T. Juwono, Agus Suharyanto, Alwafi Pujiraharjo, Djoko Legono, Dian Sisinggih, David Neil, Masaharu Fujita, and Tetsuya Sumi
: pp. 631-638
Exploring Elements of Disaster Prevention Consciousness: Based on Interviews with Anti-disaster Professionals
Abstract
Miki Ozeki, Kan Shimazaki, and Taiyoung Yi

No.2

(Mar)

The Second JDR Award
Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 2

The Second JDR Award

: p. 222
Congratulations! The Second JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
: p. 223
Presenting the Second JDR Award
Tomoyuki Takahashi
: p. 224
Message from the Winner
Harry Yeh

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 2

: p. 225
Disaster and Big Data Part 2
Shunichi Koshimura

6 years have passed since the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. Many new findings, insights and suggestions have been made and were implemented in disaster observation, sensing, simulation, and damage determination. The challenges for disaster mitigation against future catastrophic natural disasters, such as the Tokyo metropolitan earthquake and Nankai Trough earthquake, are how we share the visions of the possible impacts and prepare for mitigating the losses and damages, and how we enhance society’s disaster resilience. A huge amount of information called “disaster big data” obtained, which are related to the dynamic flow of a large number of people, vehicles and goods inside and outside the affected areas. This has dramatically facilitated our understanding of how our society has responded to the unprecedented catastrophes. The key question is how we use big data in establishing the social systems that respond promptly, sensibly and effectively to natural disasters, and in withstanding the adversities with resilience. Researchers with various expertise are working together under the collaborative project called JST CREST “Establishing the most advanced disaster reduction management system by fusion of real-time disaster simulation and big data assimilation.” The project aims to identify possible disaster scenarios caused by earthquake and tsunami that occur and progress in a chained or compound manner and to create new technologies to lead responses and disaster mitigation measures that encourages the society to get over the disaster. This special issue titled “Disaster and Big Data Part 2,” including 13 papers, aims to share the recent progress of the project as the sequel of Part 1 published in March 2016. As an editor of this issue, I would like to express our deep gratitude for the insightful comments and suggestions made by the reviewers and the members of the editorial committee.

: pp. 226-232
Fusion of Real-Time Disaster Simulation and Big Data Assimilation – Recent Progress
Abstract
Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 233-240
Seismic Hazard Visualization from Big Simulation Data: Cluster Analysis of Long-Period Ground-Motion Simulation Data
Abstract
Takahiro Maeda and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 241-250
Extraction of Collapsed Buildings in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake Using Multi-Temporal PALSAR-2 Data
Abstract
Wen Liu and Fumio Yamazaki
: pp. 251-258
Verification of a Method for Estimating Building Damage in Extensive Tsunami Affected Areas Using L-Band SAR Data
Abstract
Hideomi Gokon, Shunichi Koshimura, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 259-271
Object-Based Building Damage Assessment Methodology Using Only Post Event ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Dual Polarimetric SAR Intensity Images
Abstract
Yanbing Bai, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, Hideomi Gokon, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 272-286
Investigation of Traffic and Evacuation Aspects at Kumamoto Earthquake and the Future Issues
Abstract
Yosuke Kawasaki, Masao Kuwahara, Yusuke Hara, Takuma Mitani, Atsushi Takenouchi, Takamasa Iryo, and Junji Urata
: pp. 287-295
Predicting Delay of Commuting Activities Following Frequently Occurring Disasters Using Location Data from Smartphones
Abstract
Takahiro Yabe, Yoshihide Sekimoto, Akihito Sudo, and Kota Tsubouchi
: pp. 296-310
Wide-Area Evacuation Simulation Incorporating Rescue and Firefighting by Local Residents
Abstract
Toshihiro Osaragi and Takuya Oki
: pp. 311-319
Simulation Analysis of Fire Brigade Action Strategies During Multiple Simultaneous Fires
Abstract
Toshihiro Osaragi and Noriaki Hirokawa
: pp. 320-328
Early Fire Alert System During an Evacuation with Mobile Sensing Technology
Abstract
Hideki Mori, Masaki Ito, and Kaoru Sezaki
: pp. 329-334
Text-Data Reduction Method to Grasp the Sequence of a Disaster Situation: Case Study of Web News Analysis of the 2015 Typhoons 17 and 18
Abstract
Shosuke Sato, Toru Okamoto, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 335-346
Online Information as Real-Time Big Data About Heavy Rain Disasters and its Limitations: Case Study of Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, During Typhoons 17 and 18 in 2015
Abstract
Shosuke Sato, Shuichi Kure, Shuji Moriguchi, Keiko Udo, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 347-354
Difference Operators in Simulation Data Warehouses
Abstract
Jing Zhao, Yoshiharu Ishikawa, Yukiko Wakita, and Kento Sugiura

Regular Papers

: pp. 355-367
Global Water-Related Risk Indicators: Meta-Analysis of Indicator Requirements
Abstract
Karina Vink, Md. Nasif Ahsan, Hisaya Sawano, and Miho Ohara
: pp. 368-377
Basic Study on Appropriate Ways to Hold Reserves to Continue Domestic Life After Large-Scale Earthquakes
Abstract
Kimiro Meguro

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on “Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters Part 2

Special Issue on “Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters Part 2

: p. 5
“Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters Part 2
Haruo Hayashi, Kimiro Meguro, and Keiko Tamura

Based on the lessons from the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology has launched “Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters (2012–2016)” with the aim of reducing the damages caused by the urban earthquake disasters such as the projected earthquake that directly hits Tokyo area and the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes as much as possible. This project is divided into the following three subprojects: namely, 1) “Research and Study on Evaluation of Risk and Hazard of Earthquake that Directly Hits Tokyo Area” represented by Professor Naoshi Hirata, Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo; 2) “Research and Study on Maintenance and Recovery of Functionality in Urban Infrastructures” represented by Professor Masayoshi Nakashima, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University; and 3) “Research and Study on Measures to Improve Urban Resilience to Earthquake Disaster” represented by Dr. Haruo Hayashi, President of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience. This special issue focuses on the findings of the subproject 3). The subproject 3) aims to develop the information communication system for supporting efficient management of emergency responses and restoration efforts and promotion of the capabilities for solution of the problems in terms of disaster, i.e. disaster management literacy, to contribute to high resilience to disaster in our society.

: pp. 6-16
Developing a Web-Based Supporting Application for Individual Evacuation Plans Through Hazard Risk and Geographical Analyses
Abstract
Munenari Inoguchi, Takahiro Sekikawa, and Keiko Tamura
: pp. 17-41
Proposing A Multi-Hazard Approach to Disaster Management Education to Enhance Children’s “Zest for Life”: Development of Disaster Management Education Programs to Be Practiced by Teachers
Abstract
Toshimitsu Nagata and Reo Kimura
: pp. 42-56
Development of a “Disaster Management Literacy Hub” for Collecting, Creating, and Transmitting Disaster Management Content to Increase Disaster Management Literacy
Abstract
Reo Kimura, Haruo Hayashi, Kosuke Kobayashi, Takahiro Nishino, Kenshin Urabe, and Satoshi Inoue
: pp. 57-66
Efficiency Evaluation of Standard Operating Procedures in a Disaster Information System
Abstract
Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yuji Maeda, Fumiaki Ichinose, Masahiro Sugiyama, Tomomi Yamamoto, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 67-78
Disaster Information System Using Natural Language Processing
Abstract
Naoko Kosaka, Akira Koyama, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yuji Maeda, Hiroko Koumoto, Shingo Suzuki, Kenshi Yamaguchi, and Kentaro Inui
: pp. 79-89
Damage Assessment of Road Bridges Subjected to the 2011 Tohoku Pacific Earthquake Tsunami
Abstract
Gaku Shoji and Tomoharu Nakamura
: pp. 90-105
Verification of Information Sharing System on Shelter, COCOA, at Comprehensive Disaster Drill in Ishinomaki City
Abstract
Muneyoshi Numada, Satoshi Takatsu, Yasuhide Yamauchi, Kimiro Meguro, and Tetsuo Ito
: pp. 106-117
Exposure of Population and Energy-Related Base Facilities to Shaking Intensity Predicted for Nankai Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
Nobuoto Nojima and Hiroki Kato
: pp. 118-130
Development of the Wide-Area Earthquake Damage Estimation System and Mashup of Disaster Prevention Information
Abstract
Masafumi Hosokawa, Ken-ichi Takanashi, Shoji Doshida, Makoto Endo, and Byeong-pyo Jeong
: pp. 131-136
Development of Tsunami Fragility Functions for Ground-Level Roads
Abstract
Yoshihisa Maruyama and Osamu Itagaki
: pp. 137-146
People Who Cannot Move During a Disaster – Initiatives and Examples in Japan Disaster Victim Support
Abstract
Eiichi Yamasaki and Haruo Hayashi

Regular Papers

: pp. 147-157
The Impact of the Thai Flood of 2011 on the Rural Poor Population Living on the Flood Plain
Abstract
Yukiko Tahira and Akiyuki Kawasaki
: pp. 158-162
A Primary Assessment of Society-Based Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Kabul City, Afghanistan
Abstract
Mohammad Kazem Naseri and Dongshik Kang
: pp. 163-175
Analysis of Pressure and Acceleration Signals from the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Observed by the DONET Seafloor Network
Abstract
Hiroyuki Matsumoto, Mikhail A. Nosov, Sergey V. Kolesov, and Yoshiyuki Kaneda
: pp. 176-186
Study on the Characteristics of Rainfall Runoff in the Kinugawa River Basin and the Evacuation Behavior of the Residents at the Time of Kanto and Tohoku Flood Disaster in September, 2015
Abstract
Yoshimasa Morooka and Tadashi Yamada
: pp. 187-197
Agrometeorological Disaster Grading in Guangdong Province Based on Data Mining
Abstract
Danni Wang, Shitai Bao, Chunlin Wang, and Chongyang Wang
: pp. 198-207
Experimental Study on Dam-Break Hydrodynamic Characteristics Under Different Conditions
Abstract
Hui Liu and Haijiang Liu

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Last updated on Apr. 13, 2021