Journals

Create Account

To Get Full Text ⇒

Mechanical Engineering

Risk Management

Computer Science

Archives

JDR

Journal of Disaster Research

ISSN : 1881-2473(Print) / 1883-8030(Online)
DOI : 10.20965/jdr.issn.1883-8030
Editors-in-Chief : Suminao Murakami (Laboratory of Urban Safety Planning)
Haruo Hayashi (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience)

Indexed in ESCI, Scopus, Compendex (Ei)

[Scopus]

ESCI

Close All
Open All

2019-10-31T15:07:56+0000

Vol.14 (2019)

Scientific Communication Online

No.8

(Nov)

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2

: p. 1009
the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2
Yuichi Ono and Daisuke Sasaki

A year has passed since the first special issue on the development of disaster statistics was published in the Journal of Disaster Research. The Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS) at Tohoku University is steadily making progress as well. The GCDS now participates in Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments (SFVC), which was launched by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR). In addition, the GCDS has committed to publishing this special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research toward the development of disaster statistics. Needless to say, the publication of the special issue itself has a positive impact on accelerating research activity at the GCDS.

The guest editors are pleased to publish valuable academic articles that are closely related to the activities of the GCDS, thus contributing to the development of disaster statistics. In this second issue, there seem to be two main categories of research questions: “development of the existing disciplined-based research” and “analyzing various issues by means of questionnaire surveys.” Under the first category, by means of disaster statistics, two disciplines are covered: river engineering and international studies. The large number of studies based on questionnaire surveys act as an excellent reminder of the effectiveness of such a survey as a methodology for disaster statistics.

Last but not least, we hope that this second special issue on the development of disaster statistics will also contribute to the literature on disaster statistics and accelerate its development.

: pp. 1010-1013
Overview of the Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics Part 2
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Sasaki and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1014-1023
Quantifying Disaster Casualties Centered on Flooding in the Chikugo River Middle Basin in the Past 400 Years to Determine the Historical Context of the July 2017 Northern Kyushu Torrential Rainfall
Abstract
Please log in.
Jun Teramura and Yukihiro Shimatani
: pp. 1024-1029
Analysis of the Attitude Within Asia-Pacific Countries Towards Disaster Risk Reduction: Text Mining of the Official Statements of 2018 Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Sasaki
: pp. 1030-1046
Effects of Post-Disaster Aid Measures to Firms: Evidence from Tohoku University Earthquake Recovery Firm Survey 2012–2015
Abstract
Please log in.
Yuzuru Isoda, Satoru Masuda, and Shin-Ichi Nishiyama
: pp. 1047-1058
Analyzing the Association Between Disaster Risk Preparedness and Environmental Consciousness of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: The Case of Sukagawa City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoko Kimura, Satoshi Hoshino, and Kenichiro Onitsuka
: pp. 1059-1065
Impression of the Reconstruction and Satisfaction with Life After the Great East Japan Earthquake: Tago Nishi’s Disaster Restoration Public Housing
Abstract
Please log in.
Shinya Tsukada and Tetsuo Morita
: pp. 1066-1071
Exploratory Analysis of the Relationship Between Livelihood Disruptions and Displacement Intentions Following a Volcanic Eruption: A Case from the 2014 Mt. Kelud Eruption
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasuhito Jibiki, Dicky Pelupessy, and Kanako Iuchi
: pp. 1072-1085
Recent Perceptions of Volcanic Hazard-Related Information in Japan: Expectation of Eruption Predictability and Acceptance of Uncertainty
Abstract
Please log in.
Miwa Kuri
: pp. 1086-1104
Citizen Satisfaction and Continuing Intentions Regarding Support and Compensation Prescribed by the Chernobyl Act: A Case Study of the Russian Central Federal District
Abstract
Please log in.
Tetsuya Nakamura, Satoru Masuda, Atsushi Maruyama, and Yuki Yano

Regular Papers

: pp. 1105-1114
General Review on Hog Cholera (Classical Swine Fever), African Swine Fever, and Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis Infection
Abstract
Please log in.
Sumio Shinoda, Tamaki Mizuno, and Shin-ichi Miyoshi
: pp. 1115-1126
Study on Disaster Medical Response During the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Based on Essential Elements of Information – Nine Days at Iwate Prefecture from Hyperacute Phase to Subacute Phase –
Abstract
Please log in.
Shinji Akitomi, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Naoko Kosaka, Yuji Maeda, Haruo Hayashi, Jun Murai, and Kimiro Meguro

No.7

(Oct)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: pp. 939-948
Drought Index for Peatland Wildfire Management in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia During El Niño Phenomenon
Abstract
Please log in.
Novitasari Novitasari, Joko Sujono, Sri Harto, Azwar Maas, and Rachmad Jayadi
: pp. 949-958
Stampede Events and Strategies for Crowd Management
Abstract
Please log in.
Chun-Hao Shao, Pei-Chun Shao, and Fang-Ming Kuo
: pp. 959-971
Disaster Emergency Response Plan of the Royal Thai Embassy in Tokyo, Japan: A Review
Abstract
Please log in.
Patcharavadee Thamarux, Anawat Suppasri, Natt Leelawat, Masashi Matsuoka, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 972-977
Time Variation in the Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Volcanic Gas at Mt. Mihara of Izu-Oshima Island, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Takeshi Ohba, Muga Yaguchi, Kana Nishino, and Nozomi Numanami
: pp. 978-990
A Discussion on the Nation’s Command and Coordination Regarding Emergency Fire Response Teams
Abstract
Please log in.
Tetsuo Murota and Fumio Takeda
: pp. 991-995
Constituent Mineral and Water-Soluble Components of Volcanic Ash from the 2018 Eruption of Mt. Motoshirane of Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Muga Yaguchi, Takeshi Ohba, Nozomi Numanami, and Ryohei Kawaguchi

No.6

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Western Japan Heavy Rain

Special Issue on the Western Japan Heavy Rain

: p. 873
the Western Japan Heavy Rain
Haruo Hayashi

In 2018, Japan not only had an abnormally hot summer, but also experienced successive disasters, including the Northern Osaka Earthquake, the Western Japan Heavy Rain, Typhoon No. 21, the Hokkaido Mid Iburi Earthquake, and Typhoon No. 24. In particular, the record-breaking heavy rains continued in a large area of Western Japan from June 28 to July 4, due to the storm front and Typhoon No. 7. The amount of rainfall totaled over 1,800 mm in the Shikoku Region and 1,200 mm in the Tokai Region. The quantity of rain that fell within 48 and 72 hours in both the Chugoku and Kinki Regions, as well as many other areas, was the highest rainfall ever recorded. A special warning regarding heavy rain was issued in 10 prefectures and every kind of disaster that Japan had experienced recently occurred in various locations. As of August 21, a report from Disaster Management Section, Cabinet Office indicated 221 deaths, 9 missing persons, 68 severely injured persons, 319 slightly injured persons, 3 persons with an unknown level of injury, 6,206 destroyed homes, 9,764 severely-damaged homes, 3,765 partially-destroyed homes, 9,006 homes with flooding above the first-floor level, and 20,086 houses with flooding below the first-floor level.

During this large-scale disaster, which was named the Western Japan Heavy Rain, the Disaster Relief Act was applied to 110 municipalities and JDR decided to issue a special edition to address issues pertinent to this specific disaster event. Paper submissions were requested that not only comprised demonstrative researches on hazard and damage characteristics, methods of evacuation, and features of disaster response, but also included introductions of best practices, which were conducted in various fields and prompted diverse collaboration to develop and establish measures to mediate the effect of the future Nankai Trough Earthquake, as well as problems and solutions to successfully realize diverse collaboration. In response to the call for papers for the special issue, nine researches were submitted and six were accepted following a strict review process. To address the category of hazard characteristics analyses, two papers analyzing the characteristics of the flooding resulting from the Western Japan Heavy Rain and one paper comprising an analysis of landslide disasters were accepted. In the category of disaster response, one paper focusing on the use of SNS and two papers regarding the elderly were accepted. It would be our sincere pleasure if this special issue could contribute to future reductions in damage resulting from natural disasters.

: pp. 874-885
Flooding Along Oda River Due to the Western Japan Heavy Rain in 2018
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasuo Nihei, Asataro Shinohara, Kaho Ohta, Shiro Maeno, Ryosuke Akoh, Yoshihisa Akamatsu, Takashi Komuro, Tomoya Kataoka, Shiho Onomura, and Ryo Kaneko
: pp. 886-893
Characteristics of Flood Flow with Active Sediment Transport in the Sozu River Flood Hazards at the Severe Rainfall Event in July 2018
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Harada, Naoko Nagumo, Yousuke Nakamura, and Shinji Egashira
: pp. 894-902
Distribution and Characteristics of Slope Movements in the Southern Part of Hiroshima Prefecture Caused by the Heavy Rain in Western Japan in July 2018
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideaki Goto, Yasuhiro Kumahara, Shoichiro Uchiyama, Yoshiya Iwasa, Tomoru Yamanaka, Rinako Motoyoshi, Shun Takeuchi, Sho Murata, and Takashi Nakata
: pp. 903-911
An Analysis of Factors Influencing Disaster Mobility Using Location Data from Smartphones: Case Study of Western Japan Flooding
Abstract
Please log in.
Soohyun Joo, Takehiro Kashiyama, Yoshihide Sekimoto, and Toshikazu Seto
: pp. 912-921
Mortality by Age Group and Municipality in the July 2018 Torrential Rainfall
Abstract
Please log in.
Miho Ohara and Naoko Nagumo
: pp. 922-935
Evacuation Behavior of Facilities for the Elderly in the Heavy Rain of July 2018
Abstract
Please log in.
Junko Kanai and Susumu Nakano

No.5

(Aug)

Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 2

Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 2

: pp. 687-700
Tracing Volcanic Activity Chronology from a Multiparameter Dataset at Shinmoedake Volcano (Kirishima), Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Taishi Yamada, Hideki Ueda, Toshiya Mori, and Toshikazu Tanada
: pp. 701-712
Muographic Observation of Density Variations in the Vicinity of Minami-Dake Crater of Sakurajima Volcano
Abstract
Please log in.
László Oláh, Hiroyuki K. M. Tanaka, Gergő Hamar, and Dezső Varga
: pp. 713-727
Database of Crustal Deformation Observed by SAR: Improving Atmospheric Delay Mitigation for Satellite SAR Interferometry and Developing L-Band Multi-Type Portable SAR
Abstract
Please log in.
Taku Ozawa, Yosuke Aoki, Satoshi Okuyama, Xiaowen Wang, Yousuke Miyagi, and Akira Nohmi
: pp. 728-743
Development of an Optical Multispectral Remote Sensing System for Measuring Volcanic Surface Phenomena – Promotion Project for Next Generation Volcano Research B2 (Subtopic 2-2)
Abstract
Please log in.
Tetsuya Jitsufuchi
: pp. 744-754
Installation of New GNSS Network Around Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan: Its Perspective and the First Result
Abstract
Please log in.
Rina Noguchi, Tatsuji Nishizawa, Wataru Kanda, Takahiro Ohkura, and Akihiko Terada
: pp. 755-765
Late Pleistocene–Holocene Volcaniclastic Ejecta Along the Southern Apron of the Esan Volcanic Complex, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Miura, Ryuta Furukawa, and Ken-ichi Arai
: pp. 766-779
Comparative Petrological Studies of 1962 and 1988–1989 Eruptions of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan: A Case Study for Understanding the Relationship Between Eruption Style and Magma Processes
Abstract
Please log in.
Mitsuhiro Nakagawa, Akiko Matsumoto, Kyohei Kobayashi, and Keiji Wada
: pp. 780-785
Measurement of H2O Molecule and Hydroxyl Concentrations in Hydrous Rhyolitic Glass by UV–Vis–NIR Dispersive Microspectroscopy
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Miwa
: pp. 786-797
Experimental High-Resolution Forecasting of Volcanic Ash Hazard at Sakurajima, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Alexandros Panagiotis Poulidis, Tetsuya Takemi, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 798-809
Integrated Monitoring of Volcanic Ash and Forecasting at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Masato Iguchi, Haruhisa Nakamichi, Hiroshi Tanaka, Yusaku Ohta, Atsushi Shimizu, and Daisuke Miki

Regular Papers

: pp. 811-828
X-MP Radar for Developing a Lahar Rainfall Threshold for the Merapi Volcano Using a Bayesian Approach
Abstract
Please log in.
Ratih Indri Hapsari, Satoru Oishi, Magfira Syarifuddin, Rosa Andrie Asmara, and Djoko Legono
: pp. 829-842
An Open Dialogue Approach to Volcano Disaster Resilience and Governance: Action Research in Japan in the Aftermath of the Mt. Ontake Eruption
Abstract
Please log in.
Hidenroi Nakamura, Koshun Yamaoka, Masae Horii, and Ryoichi Miyamae
: pp. 843-860
Study on the National Disaster Management Administration System Against Huge Disasters – A Discussion Based on the Initial and Emergency Responses to the Great East Japan Earthquake –
Abstract
Please log in.
Akira Kotaki and Fumio Takeda

No.4

(Jun)

The Fourth JDR Award
Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 1

The Fourth JDR Award

: p. 565
Congratulations! The Fourth JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi

We announce that the Fourth JDR Award was won by Professor Emeritus Nobuo Shuto, Tohoku University, Japan. We congratulate the winner and sincerely wish for future success.

: p. 566
Presenting the Fourth JDR Award
Tomoyuki Takahashi

It is our great pleasure to present the Fourth JDR Award to Professor Nobuo Shuto for his outstanding contributions to the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) as the Honorary Editor.

Professor Shuto, Professor Emeritus of Tohoku University, is a pioneer of the theoretical study of tsunamis. He has also made a large contribution to the development of numerical simulations, visualization through computer graphics, and other critical techniques for the study and control of tsunami disasters. The development of tsunami disaster reduction and management that we have today is thanks in large part to his achievements.

On behalf of the JDR editorial board, I wish to thank Professor Nobuo Shuto for his efforts and to congratulate him as the winner of the Fourth JDR Award.

: p. 567
Message from the Winner
Nobuo Shuto

After the 1960 Great Chilean Tsunami, coastal dikes were remodeled and new ones constructed in Japan. In 1968, immediately after the completion of those construction and remodeling works, the Tokachi-Oki Earthquake struck, but fortunately the structures involved sustained very little damage. This led to a general feeling that it was possible to protect against the tsunamis completely by simply building coastal dikes and other defense structures. Japan did not see an increase in the number of tsunami researchers, but things were worse in the U.S. The National Science Foundation allocated its tsunami-related budget only to the NOAA, which issues tsunami forecasts, and allocated the rest of the budget entirely to ocean development. This situation continued until the 1983 Nihonkai-Chubu Earthquake Tsunami struck. In 1992, there was a tsunami earthquake off the coast of Nicaragua. Following that, research was conducted based on international cooperation through fax communications. Then cooperative international research continued to be done on tsunamis such as the 1992 Flores Tsunami, the 1993 Hokkaido Nansei-Oki Earthquake Tsunami, and the 1996 Irian Jaya Tsunami. However, their findings were provided only through Proceedings of the International Tsunami Symposium every two years, and most of the findings were limited to factual information about tsunamis.

Requests for information on tsunamis rapidly increased after the 2004 Great Indian Ocean Tsunami, information not only on the tsunami itself but also on tsunami countermeasures. It was when JDR made its appearance. The JDR disseminated the latest information for practical use. It also benefitted those who were the sources of information, as they no longer had to deal with the frustration of having to wait for conferences held only every two years. In addition, the JDR reviews submissions much more quickly than do other journals. Tsunamis, such as the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami and the 2018 Sulawesi Earthquake Tsunami, continue to strike. As a platform for sharing knowledge related to reconstruction and countermeasures, as well as to tsunamis themselves, the importance the JDR is growing.

This is why you are encouraged to contribute to the JDR.

Special Issue on Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development Part 1

: pp. 569-570
Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development
Yuichi Morita, Eisuke Fujita, Mitsuhiro Nakagawa, and Setsuya Nakada

The phreatic eruption of the Ontake volcano in 2014 reminded us that even moderately active volcanoes, most of which are tourist attractions in Japan, can sometimes exhibit unpredictable and hazardous behaviors, taking away the lives of those who do not fully recognize their threat. With this adding momentum, the Japanese people want volcanology and its applications to be developed to further improve the precision of volcanic eruption alerts. To meet this expectation, a comprehensive program, the “Integrated program for next-generation volcano research and human resource development,” sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, was started in November 2016 on a 10-years plan. The most stunning aspect of this program is the integration of (1) a research project and (2) a human resource development program to mitigate volcanic disasters in Japan from long-term point of view. Both of these are collaboratively supported by many researchers from almost all Japanese universities and national institutions related to volcanology. This special issue compiles several topics in this research project to demonstrate its present stage of development and to indicate its anticipated future destination. The target of the research project is to develop, using multi-disciplinary scientific methods, new ways of evaluating volcanic hazards. Specifically, four research groups jointly (A) construct a data archive and exchange system connecting all Japanese volcanologists, (B) develop new geophysical and geochemical observation techniques and methods of analyzing data, (C) evolve methods of predicting volcanic eruptions based on eruption history from precise geological survey and numerical simulations, and (D) propose the provision of technologies for volcanic disasters. We hope that this program will greatly help to mitigate volcanic disasters in Japan, and we will strive to realize this through the research project.

: pp. 571-579
Development of a Data Sharing System for Japan Volcanological Data Network
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideki Ueda, Taishi Yamada, Takahiro Miwa, Masashi Nagai, and Takanori Matsuzawa
: pp. 580-591
Significance of Electromagnetic Surveys at Active Volcanoes: Toward Evaluating the Imminence of Wet Eruptions
Abstract
Please log in.
Takeshi Hashimoto, Wataru Kanda, Yuichi Morita, Midori Hayakawa, Ryo Tanaka, Hiroshi Aoyama, and Makoto Uyeshima
: pp. 592-603
Feasibility Study on a Multi-Channeled Seismometer System with Phase-Shifted Optical Interferometry for Volcanological Observations
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomoki Tsutsui, Yoshiharu Hirayama, Toshiharu Ikeda, Keiji Takeuchi, and Hiroshi Ando
: pp. 604-615
Evaluating Volcanic Hazard Risk Through Numerical Simulations
Abstract
Please log in.
Eisuke Fujita, Yu Iriyama, Toshiki Shimbori, Eiichi Sato, Kensuke Ishii, Yujiro Suzuki, Kae Tsunematsu, and Koji Kiyosugi
: pp. 616-622
A Simple Procedure for Measuring Magma Rheology
Abstract
Please log in.
Aika K. Kurokawa, Takahiro Miwa, and Hidemi Ishibashi
: pp. 623-629
Conveying Volcano Information Effectively to Stakeholders – A New Project for Promotion of Next Generation Volcano Research
Abstract
Please log in.
Setsuya Nakada, Yousuke Miyagi, Tomohiro Kubo, and Eisuke Fujita
: pp. 630-640
Ku-Band High-Speed Scanning Doppler Radar for Volcanic Eruption Monitoring
Abstract
Please log in.
Masayuki Maki, Shinobu Takahashi, Sumiya Okada, Katsuyuki Imai, and Hiroshi Yamaguchi

Regular Papers

: pp. 641-648
Weather Conditions and Warm Air Masses in Southern Sakha During Active Forest Fire Periods
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroshi Hayasaka, Koji Yamazaki, and Daisuke Naito
: pp. 649-666
Mathematical Model for Locating a Pre-Positioned Warehouse and for Calculating Inventory Levels
Abstract
Please log in.
Erika Barojas-Payán, Diana Sánchez-Partida, José Luis Martínez-Flores, and Damián Emilio Gibaja-Romero
: pp. 667-677
Public Private Partnership Operational Model – A Conceptual Study on Implementing Scientific-Evidence-Based Integrated Risk Management at Regional Level
Abstract
Please log in.
Yanling Lee, Kenji Watanabe, and Wei-Sen Li

No.3

(Mar)

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 4

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 4

: p. 415
Disaster and Big Data Part 4
Shunichi Koshimura

The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami disaster taught us many lessons. Many new findings, insights, and suggestions have been made and implemented in damage determination and in disaster observation, sensing, and simulation. The challenges in terms of mitigating damage from future catastrophic natural disasters, such as the expected Metropolitan Tokyo Earthquake and Nankai Trough Earthquake and Tsunami, are how we share the visions of the possible impacts and prepare to mitigate loss and damage, how we enhance society’s disaster resilience and the ability of society and social systems to prepare well, how we respond promptly and effectively to natural disasters, and how we apply lessons learned to future disaster management.

In recent years, a huge amount of information known as “disaster big data,” including data related to the dynamic movement of a large number of people, vehicles, and goods as IoT, has been obtained to understand how our society responds to natural disasters, both inside and outside the affected areas. The key question is how to utilize disaster big data to enhance disaster resilience.

Researchers with various areas of expertise are working together in a collaborative project called JST CREST: “Establishing the Most Advanced Disaster Reduction Management System by Fusion of Real-Time Disaster Simulation and Big Data Assimilation.” The project aims to identify possible disaster scenarios caused by earthquakes and tsunamis that occur and progress in a chained or compound manner, as well as to create new technologies to lead responses and disaster mitigation measures that help societies recover from disasters.

Since 2016, we have published three special issues entitled “Disaster and Big Data,” and now we will publish a fourth one which includes 10 research papers and 1 report. These aim to share the recent progress of the project as a sequel to Part 3, published in March 2018. As a guest editor of this issue, I would like to express our deep gratitude for the insightful comments and suggestions made by the reviewers and members of the editorial committee. It is my hope that the fruits of everyone’s efforts and outcomes will be utilized in disaster management efforts to mitigate damage and losses from future catastrophic disasters.

: pp. 416-434
Development and Validation of a Tsunami Numerical Model with the Polygonally Nested Grid System and its MPI-Parallelization for Real-Time Tsunami Inundation Forecast on a Regional Scale
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuya Inoue, Takashi Abe, Shunichi Koshimura, Akihiro Musa, Yoichi Murashima, and Hiroaki Kobayashi
: pp. 435-444
Cluster Analysis of the Long-Period Ground-Motion Simulation Data: Application of the Sagami Trough Megathrust Earthquake Scenarios
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Maeda, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Sho Akagi, and Toshihiko Hayakawa
: pp. 445-455
Extraction of Inundation Areas Due to the July 2018 Western Japan Torrential Rain Event Using Multi-Temporal ALOS-2 Images
Abstract
Please log in.
Wen Liu, Fumio Yamazaki, and Yoshihisa Maruyama
: pp. 456-465
Building Damage Assessment Using Intensity SAR Data with Different Incidence Angles and Longtime Interval
Abstract
Please log in.
Pinglan Ge, Hideomi Gokon, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 466-477
Analysis of Traffic State During a Heavy Rain Disaster Using Probe Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Shogo Umeda, Yosuke Kawasaki, and Masao Kuwahara
: pp. 478-488
Quick Estimation Method of Property Damage and Human Casualty in the Event of a Large Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuya Oki, Toshihiro Osaragi, and Yoho Sakamoto
: pp. 489-499
Relationships Between Accessibility of Emergency Vehicles and Local Environments in Tokyo Metropolitan Area After a Large Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Maki Kishimoto and Toshihiro Osaragi
: pp. 500-507
Optimal Mobility Control of Sensors in the Event of a Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Yuichi Nakamura, Masaki Ito, and Kaoru Sezaki
: pp. 508-520
Estimation of Supply Chain Network Disruption of Companies Across the Country Affected by the Nankai Trough Earthquake Tsunami in Kochi City
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshiki Ogawa, Yuki Akiyama, Muneta Yokomatsu, Yoshihide Sekimoto, and Ryosuke Shibasaki
: pp. 521-530
Analysis of Evacuation Trajectory Data Using Tensor Decomposition
Abstract
Please log in.
Yusuke Kawai, Yoshiharu Ishikawa, and Kento Sugiura
: pp. 531-538
An Analysis of Web Coverage on the 2018 West Japan Heavy Rain Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato and Fumihiko Imamura

Regular Papers

: pp. 539-551
Analysis of Optimal Scale of Tsunami Protection Facility and Associated Residual Risk
Abstract
Please log in.
Koji Fujima and Yasuko Hiwatashi

No.2

(Mar)

Special Issue on Enhancement of Societal Resiliency Against Natural Disasters

Special Issue on Enhancement of Societal Resiliency Against Natural Disasters

: p. 211
Enhancement of Societal Resiliency Against Natural Disasters
Muneo Hori

Enhancing social resilience in the event of natural disasters is a critical issue for Japan. It will requires a need huge efforts to further increase the physical preparedness; on the other hand, compared to increasing physical preparedness, enhancing social resilience is a cost-effective means of mitigating the effects of natural disasters. The Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion program (SIP), the biggest national research program in Japan, selected a theme related to enhancing social resilience in the face of natural disasters in 2014. The authors of this special issue worked as a part of the SIP for five years and developed state-of-the-art technologies for the enhancement, namely, next-generation tsunami and heavy rain observation, integrated liquefaction counter-measures, methods for sharing disaster information, a real-time disaster estimation system, an emergency communication system, and the development of applications for regional use. Most of the technologies have been implemented in efforts at natural disaster mitigation following earthquakes and heavy rains in 2017 and 2018. The development and implementation of advanced technologies are the essence of the SIP because it aims to foster innovation. While the SIP is a Japanese government program, it promotes international utilization of the technologies it develops. There are many instances which might be studied better by developing and utilizing advanced technologies in various countries following different types of natural disasters. I hope that this special issue will be a gateway for readers who are interested in using such advanced technologies to mitigate natural disasters and enhance social resilience during such events.

: pp. 212-224
Development and Utilization of Real-Time Tsunami Inundation Forecast System Using S-net Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Shin Aoi, Wataru Suzuki, Naotaka Yamamoto Chikasada, Takayuki Miyoshi, Taro Arikawa, and Katsumi Seki
: pp. 225-234
Development and Applicability of Multiscale Multiphysics Integrated Simulator for Tsunami
Abstract
Please log in.
Taro Arikawa, Yu Chida, Katsumi Seki, Tomohiro Takagawa, and Kenichiro Shimosako
: pp. 235-247
Development of Multi-Parameter Phased Array Weather Radar (MP-PAWR) and Early Detection of Torrential Rainfall and Tornado Risk
Abstract
Please log in.
Nobuhiro Takahashi, Tomoo Ushio, Katsuhiro Nakagawa, Fumihiko Mizutani, Koyuru Iwanami, Akihiko Yamaji, Takeshi Kawagoe, Masahiko Osada, Takehiro Ohta, and Masaki Kawasaki
: pp. 248-259
Statistical Validation of the Predicted Amount and Start Time of Heavy Rainfall in 2015 Based on the VIL Nowcast Method
Abstract
Please log in.
Koyuru Iwanami, Kohin Hirano, and Shingo Shimizu
: pp. 260-268
Development of a Practical River Water Level Prediction Method Using Data Assimilation Technique
Abstract
Please log in.
Shuichi Tsuchiya and Masaki Kawasaki
: pp. 269-278
Development of a Seismic-Performance Assessment Method and Retrofitting Technology Against the Liquefaction of Existing Bridges
Abstract
Please log in.
Michio Ohsumi, Toshiaki Nanazawa, Shunsuke Tanimoto, and Mitsuhiko Nakata
: pp. 279-291
The Shared Information Platform for Disaster Management –The Research and Development Regarding Technologies for Utilization of Disaster Information–
Abstract
Please log in.
Yuichiro Usuda, Takashi Matsui, Hiroshi Deguchi, Toshikazu Hori, and Shingo Suzuki
: pp. 292-302
Current Disaster Medicine in Japan and the Change Brought by Information Sharing
Abstract
Please log in.
Yuji Kondo, Manabu Ichikawa, Hisayoshi Kondo, Yuichi Koido, and Yasuhiro Otomo
: pp. 303-314
Development of Disaster Prevention Support System for Irrigation Pond (DPSIP)
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshikazu Hori, Akira Izumi, Daisuke Shoda, Tetsushi Shigeoka, and Hiroshi Yoshisako
: pp. 315-332
Development of a Real-Time Damage Estimation System
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Hiromitsu Nakamura, Shigeki Senna, Hideyuki Otani, Naoya Tomii, Kiyonori Ohtake, Toshiya Mori, and Shojiro Kataoka
: pp. 333-347
Development of Real-Time Collection, Integration, and Sharing Technology for Infrastructure Damage Information
Abstract
Please log in.
Moemi Shiraishi, Hideyuki Ashiya, Arata Konno, Kenji Morita, Tomoyuki Noro, Yasuhiro Nomura, and Shojiro Kataoka
: pp. 348-362
Development of Resilient Information and Communications Technology for Relief Against Natural Disasters
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroshi Kumagai, Hiroshi Sakurauchi, Shinsuke Koitabashi, Takeaki Uchiyama, Shinichi Sasaki, Kazuhide Noda, Makoto Ishizaki, Satoshi Kotabe, Atsushi Yamamoto, Yoshitaka Shimizu, Yasuo Suzuki, Yasunori Owada, Katsuhiro Temma, Goshi Sato, Toshiaki Miyazaki, Peng Li, Yuichi Kawamoto, Nei Kato, and Hiroki Nishiyama
: pp. 363-374
Development of Movable and Deployable ICT Resource Unit (MDRU) and its Overseas Activities
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshitaka Shimizu, Yasuo Suzuki, Ryota Sasazawa, Yuichi Kawamoto, Hiroki Nishiyama, Nei Kato, Atsushi Yamamoto, and Satoshi Kotabe
: pp. 375-386
Development of Disaster Response Applications and Improvements in Regional Disaster Prevention Capacity Based on Collaborative Information Use
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshihiro Noda, Katsuya Yamori, and Kenji Harada
: pp. 387-404
Disaster Response and Mitigation Support Technology for All-Hazards in Tokyo Metropolitan Area
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshiaki Hisada, Toshihiro Osaragi, Masahiro Murakami, Osamu Mizuno, Wataru Kobayashi, Susumu Yasuda, Miho Ohara, Tomohisa Yamashita, Kazuyuki Takada, Takashi Suematsu, Jun Shindo, Takuya Oki, and Akira Kakizaki

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products: Part 2

Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products: Part 2

: p. 5
Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products: Part 2
Masato Iguchi, Setsuya Nakada, and Kuniaki Miyamoto

Our research project titled “Integrated study on mitigation of multimodal disasters caused by ejection of volcanic products” began in 2014 under SATREPS (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development) and is now coming to an end in 2019. Indonesia has 127 active volcanoes distributed along its archipelago making it a high risk location for volcano-related disasters. The target volcanoes in our study are Guntur, Galunggung, Merapi, Kelud, and Semeru in Java, and Sinabung in North Sumatra. Guntur and Galunggung are currently dormant and are potentially high-risk volcanoes. Merapi generated pyroclastic flows along the Gendol River in 2010, which resulted in over 300 casualties and induced frequent lahars. New eruptive activity of Merapi began in 2018. The 2014 eruption of Kelud formed a gigantic ash plume over 17 km high, dispersing ash widely over the island of Java. Semeru continued minor eruptive activity, accompanying a risk of a dome collapse. The aim of our research includes disaster mitigation of the Sinabung volcano, whose eruption began to form a lava dome at its summit at the end of 2013, followed by frequent pyroclastic flows for approximately 4 years, and the deposits became the source of rain-triggered lahars. Our goal is to implement SSDM (Support System for Decision-Making), which would allow us to forecast volcano-related hazards based on scales and types of eruptions inferred from monitoring data. This special issue collects fundamental scientific knowledge and technology for the SSDM as output from our project. The SSDM is an integrated system of monitoring, constructed scenarios, forecasting scale of eruption, simulation of sediment movement and volcanic ash dispersion in the atmosphere. X-band radars newly installed by our project in Indonesia were well utilized for estimation of spatial distribution not only of rain fall in catchments but also of volcanic ash clouds. Finally, we hope the SSDM will continue to be utilized under a consortium in Merapi, which was newly established in collaboration with our projects, and extended to other volcanoes.

: pp. 6-17
A Newly Installed Seismic and Geodetic Observational System at Five Indonesian Volcanoes as Part of the SATREPS Project
Abstract
Please log in.
Haruhisa Nakamichi, Masato Iguchi, Hetty Triastuty, Hery Kuswandarto, Iyan Mulyana, Umar Rosadi, Hendra Gunawan, Gude Suantika, Nurnaning Aisyah, Agus Budi-Santoso, and I Gusti Made Agung Nandaka
: pp. 18-26
Overview of Merapi Volcanic Activities from Monitoring Data 1992–2011 Periods
Abstract
Please log in.
I Gusti Made Agung Nandaka, Sulistiyani, Yosef Suharna, and Raditya Putra
: pp. 27-39
Eruption Pattern and a Long-Term Magma Discharge Rate over the Past 100 Years at Kelud Volcano, Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Fukashi Maeno, Setsuya Nakada, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Taketo Shimano, Natsumi Hokanishi, Akhmad Zaennudin, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 40-50
Eruption Scenarios of Active Volcanoes in Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Setsuya Nakada, Fukashi Maeno, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Natsumi Hokanishi, Taketo Shimano, Akhmad Zaennudin, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 51-60
Forecast of the Pyroclastic Volume by Precursory Seismicity of Merapi Volcano
Abstract
Please log in.
Masato Iguchi, Haruhisa Nakamichi, Kuniaki Miyamoto, Makoto Shimomura, I Gusti Made Agung Nandaka, Agus Budi-Santoso, Sulistiyani, and Nurnaning Aisyah
: pp. 61-68
Temporal Changes in Runoff Characteristics of Lahars After the 1984 Eruption of Mt. Merapi, Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Yutaka Gonda, Shusuke Miyata, Masaharu Fujita, Djoko Legono, and Daizo Tsutsumi
: pp. 69-79
Improving Spatial Rainfall Estimates at Mt. Merapi Area Using Radar-Rain Gauge Conditional Merging
Abstract
Please log in.
Roby Hambali, Djoko Legono, Rachmad Jayadi, and Satoru Oishi
: pp. 80-89
Point-Based Rainfall Intensity Information System in Mt. Merapi Area by X-Band Radar
Abstract
Please log in.
Santosa Sandy Putra, Banata Wachid Ridwan, Kazuki Yamanoi, Makoto Shimomura, Sulistiyani, and Dicky Hadiyuwono
: pp. 90-104
Numerical Simulation of Historical Pyroclastic Flows of Merapi (1994, 2001, and 2006 Eruptions)
Abstract
Please log in.
Niken Angga Rukmini, Sulistiyani, and Makoto Shimomura
: pp. 105-115
Numerical Simulation of Mt. Merapi Pyroclastic Flow in 2010
Abstract
Please log in.
Makoto Shimomura, Raditya Putra, Niken Angga Rukmini, and Sulistiyani
: pp. 116-125
Numerical Simulation of Pyroclastic Flow at Mt. Semeru in 2002
Abstract
Please log in.
Makoto Shimomura, Wilfridus F. S. Banggur, and Agoes Loeqman
: pp. 126-134
Proposal of Estimation Method for Debris Flow Potential Considering Eruptive Activity
Abstract
Please log in.
Masato Iguchi
: pp. 135-150
Estimating the Volcanic Ash Fall Rate from the Mount Sinabung Eruption on February 19, 2018 Using Weather Radar
Abstract
Please log in.
Magfira Syarifuddin, Satoru Oishi, Ratih Indri Hapsari, Jiro Shiokawa, Hanggar Ganara Mawandha, and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 151-159
Ground Observation of Tephra Particles: On the Use of Weather Radar for Estimating Volcanic Ash Distribution
Abstract
Please log in.
Ratih Indri Hapsari, Masahiro Iida, Masahide Muranishi, Mariko Ogawa, Magfira Syarifuddin, Masato Iguchi, and Satoru Oishi
: pp. 160-172
Numerical Simulations of Volcanic Ash Plume Dispersal for Sakura-Jima Using Real-Time Emission Rate Estimation
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroshi L. Tanaka and Masato Iguchi

Regular Papers

: pp. 173-187
Disaster Management Following Decentralization in Indonesia: Regulation, Institutional Establishment, Planning, and Budgeting
Abstract
Please log in.
Danang Insita Putra and Mihoko Matsuyuki
: pp. 188-197
Assessing the Influence of Cell Size on Flood Modelling by the PWRI-DH Model Using IFA
Abstract
Please log in.
Amaly Fong Lee and Yoshiaki Kawata

Vol.13 (2018)

Scientific Communication Online

: sc20181204
Coastal Subsidence Induced Several Tsunamis During the 2018 Sulawesi Earthquake
Abstract
Taro Arikawa, Abdul Muhari, Yoshihiro Okumura, Yuji Dohi, Bagus Afriyanto, Karina Aprilia Sujatmiko, and Fumihiko Imamura
: sc20181108
Solving the Puzzle of the September 2018 Palu, Indonesia, Tsunami Mystery: Clues from the Tsunami Waveform and the Initial Field Survey Data
Abstract
Abdul Muhari, Fumihiko Imamura, Taro Arikawa, Aradea R. Hakim, and Bagus Afriyanto

No.7

(Dec)

Special Issue on Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017
Special Issue on the First World Bosai Forum

Special Issue on Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017

: p. 1167
Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017
Toshio Koike, Kenji Satake, and Akiyuki Kawasaki

The Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience was held in Tokyo from 23 to 25 November 2017 with 228 participants from 42 countries. To implement the priorities for action in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) 2015–2030, the Forum aimed to encourage all stakeholders to develop guidelines for supporting national platforms for DRR by making the best use of science and technology and producing a synthesis report on disaster science and technology.

During the Forum, seven working groups held presentations and panel discussions that corresponded to the four priorities for action in the Sendai Framework (1. Understanding disaster risk; 2. Strengthening disaster risk governance; 3. Investing in DDR; and 4. “Build Back Better”), as well as on Interdisciplinary collaboration, National platforms, and Synthesis report.

At the end of the Forum, seven policy briefs, as well as “Tokyo Statement 2017,” were adopted. In this special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research, co-chairs of the working groups summarize their discussions and recommendations for each working group. Additional papers on the role of private sectors and Nation’s Synthesis are also included in the issue.

We thank all the authors and reviewers of the papers, as well as all the participants of the Forum for their valuable contributions.

: pp. 1168-1176
Understanding Disaster Risk: The Role of Science and Technology
Abstract
Please log in.
Kenji Satake, Craig McLean, and Irasema Alcántara-Ayala
: pp. 1177-1180
Strengthening Disaster Risk Governance to Manage Disaster Risk: Output of the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017
Abstract
Please log in.
Kenichi Tsukahara
: pp. 1181-1186
Investing in Disaster Risk Reduction for Resilience: Roles of Science, Technology, and Education
Abstract
Please log in.
Akiyuki Kawasaki and Jakob Rhyner
: pp. 1187-1192
Formalizing the Concept of “Build Back Better” Based on the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017 WG4
Abstract
Please log in.
Keiko Tamura, Irina Rafliana, and Paul Kovacs
: pp. 1193-1198
Promotion of Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Collaboration in Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Please log in.
Kaoru Takara
: pp. 1199-1206
Strengthening National Platforms for Effective Use of Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Please log in.
Satoru Nishikawa
: pp. 1207-1212
Role of Private Sectors in Disaster Risk Reduction: Potential and Challenges
Abstract
Please log in.
Rajib Shaw
: pp. 1213-1221
Exploring the Possibility of an Online Synthesis System for Disaster Risk Reduction as a Tool to Promote “Consilience” of Knowledge and Practice
Abstract
Please log in.
Haruo Hayashi, Rajib Shaw, and Brian Doherty
: pp. 1222-1232
Role Played by Science and Technology in Disaster Risk Reduction: From Framework Planning to Implementation
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshio Koike, Haruo Hayashi, Kenji Satake, Kenichi Tsukahara, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Yusuke Amano, Kaoru Takara, Setsuko Saya, Naohiro Nishiguchi, Satoru Nishikawa, Keiko Tamura, Kenzo Hiroki, Rajib Shaw, and Tetsuya Ikeda

Special Issue on the First World Bosai Forum

: p. 1233
the First World Bosai Forum
Fumihiko Imamura, Yuichi Ono, and Daisuke Sasaki

The World Bosai Forum was held at the Sendai International Center and Kawauchi Hagi Hall, Tohoku University, bringing together 947 participants from over 42 countries. This was nearly double the number of participants that we had initially expected. Proactive and meaningful discussions were held by a wide range of officials and experts from domestic and overseas industries, governments, academia, and private sectors, as well as by local citizens. From our partnership with the Asian Conference on Urban Disaster Reduction (ACUDR) and International Symposium on New Technologies for Urban Safety of Mega Cities in Asia (USMCA), we had a total of 126 participants.

We successfully created a platform for building international cooperation to share and resolve the current situation and handle various challenges for Bosai or disaster risk reduction. Practical and effective discussions have contributed to raising and promoting awareness of Bosai and the Sendai Framework 2015–2030 to the world from Sendai. Our first World Bosai Forum was concluded with productive outcomes, and its future meetings will be held every 2 years.

The guest editors of this special issue are pleased to publish valuable academic papers presented at the first World Bosai Forum. As you may notice, this research stems from a wide variety of current issues. The nature of interdisciplinary approaches may be unique to the World Bosai Forum, and the guest editors hope that this special issue will contribute to enhanced recognition of the Forum.

: pp. 1234-1246
Overview of the World Bosai Forum Public Cultural Event: “Pre-WBF Festival – Learning from the Disaster, Bridging to the Future: Held in Partnership with the Science Agora”
Abstract
Please log in.
Natsuko Chubachi, Yuichi Ono, Kiyoshi Ito, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1247-1256
Efforts Toward Recovery and Reconstruction from the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroaki Maruya and Yasunari Watanabe
: pp. 1257-1271
Dynamic Integrated Model for Disaster Management and Socioeconomic Analysis (DIM2SEA)
Abstract
Please log in.
Erick Mas, Daniel Felsenstein, Luis Moya, A. Yair Grinberger, Rubel Das, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 1272-1287
Global Tsunami Risk Assessment: Collaboration Between Industry and Academia in the Willis Research Network (WRN)
Abstract
Please log in.
Kwanchai Pakoksung, Anawat Suppasri, Panon Latcharote, Abdul Muhari, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1288-1297
Sustainable Community Development for Disaster Resilience and Human Resources Development for Disaster Risk Reduction – Katahira-Style Disaster Resilient Community Development –
Abstract
Please log in.
Takeshi Sato, Aiko Sakurai, Yuki Sadaike, Hitoshi Konno, Masahiro Horino, Risa Yanagiya, and Takahisa Mizoi
: pp. 1298-1308
Analysis of Complexities in Natech Disaster Risk Reduction and Management: A Case Study of Cilegon, Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Fatma Lestari, Dicky Pelupessy, Yasuhito Jibiki, Fiori Amelia Putri, Ahmad Yurianto, Gama Widyaputra, Sony Maulana, Cynthia Febrina Maharani, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1309-1322
Exploring the Developmental Process and Internal Structure of Kizuki-Based Volunteer Activities for Sustainable Organizations: A Case Study of HARU
Abstract
Please log in.
Kohei Nishizuka
: pp. 1323-1332
Function of Social Capital Embedded in Religious Communities at Times of Disaster: Cases of Disaster Relief Activity by a Muslim Community and a Soka Gakkai Community in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Nobuyuki Asai

Regular Papers

: pp. 1333-1344
Repairing and Recovering Structural Performance of Earthen Walls Used in Japanese Dozo-Style Structures After Seismic Damage
Abstract
Please log in.
Hajime Yokouchi and Yoshimitsu Ohashi

No.6

(Nov)

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics

Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics

: p. 1001
the Development of Disaster Statistics
Yuichi Ono and Daisuke Sasaki

This special issue presents the findings obtained so far by the relevant studies that have been conducted mainly at the Global Centre for Disaster Statistics (GCDS), which is affiliated with the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) at Tohoku University, Japan.

The establishment of the GCDS was jointly announced by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the IRIDeS in March 2015 during the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (UNWCDRR) in Sendai, Japan. The Centre is expected to contribute greatly to sustainable development, based on risk-informed policy making, through the following activities: providing scientific analyses and technical advice based on their disaster loss and damage data, supporting the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and individual countries in the work of monitoring the progress of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and providing policy advice to build the capacities of national/local governments, based on their demands.

In this context, the guest editors of this special issue are pleased to publish valuable academic articles closely related to the GCDS’ activities that contribute to the development of disaster statistics. As Sasaki and Ono (2018) observed, there exist three major categories of research questions that contribute to the development of disaster statistics: investigation into disaster statistics and/or global disaster-related databases, development of the existing discipline-based research, and analysis of various issues through questionnaire surveys.

Last but not least, it is our hope that this special issue contributes to the literature of disaster statistics and accelerates its development.

: pp. 1002-1006
Overview of the Special Issue on the Development of Disaster Statistics
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Sasaki and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1007-1014
Comparison of Global Databases for Disaster Loss and Damage Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Kana Moriyama, Daisuke Sasaki, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1015-1023
Proposed Requirement Definition Method for Developing Global Disaster Database Based on Various Means of Data Collection
Abstract
Please log in.
Hidemi Tanaka, Daisuke Sasaki, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1024-1031
The Purpose of the Statistical Database on the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroaki Maruya and Tetsuya Torayashiki
: pp. 1032-1038
Hidden Common Factors in Disaster Loss Statistics: A Case Study Analyzing the Data of Nepal
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Sasaki, Kana Moriyama, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 1039-1048
Vulnerability Characteristics of Tsunamis in Indonesia: Analysis of the Global Centre for Disaster Statistics Database
Abstract
Please log in.
Anawat Suppasri, Abdul Muhari, Syamsidik, Ridwan Yunus, Kwanchai Pakoksung, Fumihiko Imamura, Shunichi Koshimura, and Ryan Paulik
: pp. 1049-1061
The Correlation Between Life Expectancy and Disaster Risk
Abstract
Please log in.
Shinichi Egawa, Yasuhito Jibiki, Daisuke Sasaki, Yuichi Ono, Yayoi Nakamura, Tomomi Suda, and Hiroyuki Sasaki
: pp. 1062-1071
Variability in an Optimal Infrastructure Management Policy by Internalization of Seismic Risk
Abstract
Please log in.
Daijiro Mizutani
: pp. 1072-1081
A Statistical Analysis of Japanese Inter-Prefectural Migration After Disasters
Abstract
Please log in.
Makoto Okumura and Wataru Ito
: pp. 1082-1095
Perceptions of Volcanic Hazard-Related Information Relevant to Volcano Tourism Areas in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Miwa Kuri and Anawat Suppasri
: pp. 1096-1112
Statistical Analysis of the Relationship Between Social Capital and Evacuation: The Case of the 2017 Mt. Agung Eruption
Abstract
Please log in.
Michimasa Matsumoto, Miwa Kuri, Kazuya Sugiyasu, Yasuhito Jibiki, Ni Nengah Suartini, and I Made Budiana
: pp. 1113-1124
Evacuation from Tsunami and Social Capital in Numanouchi Ward, Iwaki City
Abstract
Please log in.
Michimasa Matsumoto and Kaori Madarame
: pp. 1125-1141
Differentiation and Integration of Evacuees with Regard to Lifting the Evacuation Order Following the Nuclear Power Plant Accident: A Case Study of Naraha and Tomioka Towns, Futaba District, Fukushima Prefecture
Abstract
Please log in.
Michimasa Matsumoto
: pp. 1142-1156
Formation of Third Place by Evacuees from Nuclear Accident: Case Study of Wide Area Residents’ Association of Tomioka Town, Futaba County, Fukushima Prefecture
Abstract
Please log in.
Michimasa Matsumoto

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2018

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2018

: p. 831
NIED Frontier Research on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2018
Haruo Hayashi and Toshikazu Tanada

The National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED) is working on three tasks: predicting disasters, preventing damage, and realizing speedy reconstruction and recovery efforts in the event of natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, landslides, torrential rains, blizzards, and ice storms.

In the last two years of the NIED’s fourth mid/long term plan period, which began in 2016, the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (M6.5 and M7.3), the heavy rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July 2017, and the heavy rain event of July 2018 are listed as “named” disasters, named by Japan Meteorological Agency. In addition, there were other disasters: an avalanche accident on Nasudake in 2017, an earthquake (M6.1) with its epicenter in northern Osaka, an eruption of Kirishimayama (Shinmoedake and Ioyama) and a phreatic eruption of Kusatsu-Shiranesan in 2018.

The results of research done on the above-mentioned disasters and the latest results of ongoing projects in each research division and center were compiled as the second NIED special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR). In this special issue, we are delighted to present ten papers on three topics: climatic disasters, seismic disasters, and integrated research on disaster risk reduction. In particular, this special issue contains three papers on the above-mentioned heavy rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July 2017 and two papers related to the Kumamoto earthquake.

Although the achievements detailed in these papers are the results of individual research, the NIED hopes that these results as a whole will be fully utilized to promote science and technology for disaster risk reduction and resilience. The NIED hopes that this special issue awakens the readers’ interest in new research and, of course, creates an opportunity for further collaborative works with us.

: pp. 832-845
Spatial Analysis of the Landslide Characteristics Caused by Heavy Rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July, 2017 Using Topography, Geology, and Rainfall Levels
Abstract
Please log in.
Toru Danjo, Tomohiro Ishizawa, and Takashi Kimura
: pp. 846-859
Predictability of Precipitation Caused by Linear Precipitation Systems During the July 2017 Northern Kyushu Heavy Rainfall Event Using a Cloud-Resolving Numerical Weather Prediction Model
Abstract
Please log in.
Ryohei Kato, Ken-ichi Shimose, and Shingo Shimizu
: pp. 860-872
Analysis of Flood Inundation in Ungauged Mountainous River Basins: A Case Study of an Extreme Rain Event on 5–6 July 2017 in Northern Kyushu, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Shakti P. C., Tsuyoshi Nakatani, and Ryohei Misumi
: pp. 873-878
Introducing Quantile Mapping to a Regression Model Using a Multi-Model Ensemble to Improve Probabilistic Projections of Monthly Precipitation
Abstract
Please log in.
Noriko N. Ishizaki, Koji Dairaku, and Genta Ueno
: pp. 879-885
Gaps Between the Transmission and Reception of Information on Rainfall Amounts
Abstract
Please log in.
Kan Shimazaki, Hiroko Nakajima, Naoki Sakai, and Akiko Miyajima
: pp. 886-896
Automatic Generation of an Evaluation Model of Regional Disaster Prevention Activities Based on Self-Evaluation Questionnaire
Abstract
Please log in.
Qinglin Cui, Taiyoung Yi, Kan Shimazaki, Hitoshi Taguchi, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 897-916
Experimental Evaluation on Earthquake-Resistance of Road Retaining Wall Using Gabion
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroshi Nakazawa, Tadashi Hara, Daisuke Suetsugu, Tsuyoshi Nishi, Kentaro Kuribayashi, Katsuaki Miyoshi, and Shoji Shimomura
: pp. 917-927
Modeling of the Subsurface Structure from the Seismic Bedrock to the Ground Surface for a Broadband Strong Motion Evaluation in Kumamoto Plain
Abstract
Please log in.
Shigeki Senna, Atsushi Wakai, Haruhiko Suzuki, Atsushi Yatagai, Hisanori Matsuyama, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 928-942
Damage Detection Method for Buildings with Machine-Learning Techniques Utilizing Images of Automobile Running Surveys Aftermath of the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Shohei Naito, Hiromitsu Tomozawa, Yuji Mori, Hiromitsu Nakamura, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 943-956
Strong Motion and Tsunami Related to the AD 365 Crete Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Tsuneo Ohsumi, Yuji Dohi, and Hemanta Hazarika

Regular Papers

: pp. 957-966
Reviewing National Cybersecurity Strategies
Abstract
Please log in.
Shigeo Mori and Atsuhiro Goto
: pp. 967-977
Flood and Substance Transportation Analysis Using Satellite Elevation Data: A Case Study in Dhaka City, Bangladesh
Abstract
Please log in.
Masakazu Hashimoto, Nozomu Yoneyama, Kenji Kawaike, Tomonori Deguchi, Mohammed Abed Hossain, and Hajime Nakagawa
: pp. 978-984
Flood Preparedness: Challenges for Hospitals in Thailand
Abstract
Please log in.
Uma Langkulsen, Desire T. Rwodzi, Marc Van der Putten, and Nitaya Vajanapoom

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Expectations for Upgrading Dams Under Operation
Special Issue on Infectious Disease Control in SATREPS Projects

Special Issue on Expectations for Upgrading Dams Under Operation

: pp. 581-584
Expectations for Upgrading Dams Under Operation
Tetsuya Sumi, Makoto Nakatsugawa, and Yoshikazu Yamaguchi

1. Introduction There are approximately 2,700 dams in Japan. Their total reservoir capacity is approximately 25 billion m3 (BCM), far less than the 34.4 BCM of Hoover Dam in the US or the 39.3 BCM of the Three Gorges Dam in China. Lake Biwa, with a capacity of 27.5 BCM, which has recently been used for multiple purposes by the Lake Biwa Comprehensive Development Project, is equivalent in scale to such artificial lakes. On the other hand, dams in Japan that were constructed on mountain rivers with considerable sediment deposits are decreasing their capacity more rapidly than those constructed on continental rivers, so they require measures against deposition to maintain their long-term reservoir capacity. In addition, extreme weather phenomena (increased rainfall and drought intensity) under climate changes increase high demand for storage capacity of dams. In order to effectively use these dams as limited resources and to hand them over to the next generation in healthy state, continuous investment and development of maintenance technology are required. Recently, to promote this investment and development, “A vision for upgrading dams (effective use of existing dams to mitigate damage from frequent floods and droughts and to generate renewable energy)” was established by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport, and Tourism (MLIT) on June 27, 2017 [1]. This special issue is collecting the significance of the dam upgrading projects and important challenges from various aspects to be implemented. for further details, please refer the pdf.
(more…)

: pp. 585-594
Trends in Dam Upgrading in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Takashi Sasaki and Masafumi Kondo
: pp. 595-604
Technical Features of Shin-Katsurazawa Dam to Be Coaxially Raised with Existent Dam and Measures to Solve the Problems Involved
Abstract
Please log in.
Shun Sasaki, Koichiro Suzuki, Atsuhisa Yoshino, and Seiichi Chouno
: pp. 605-615
Technical Features of Tsuruta Dam Redevelopment Project
Abstract
Please log in.
Koji Sakamoto, Yoshimitsu Takayama, and Shoichiro Yamamura
: pp. 616-623
Comprehensive Inspection of Japanese Dams in Long-Term Operation
Abstract
Please log in.
Masafumi Kondo and Shuji Anan
: pp. 624-636
Field Verification and Evaluation of Technology Towards Introduction of Underwater Inspection Vehicle
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasushi Nitta and Takashi Yoshida
: pp. 637-649
Quantification of the Risks on Dam Preliminary Release Based on Ensemble Rainfall Forecasts and Determination of Operation
Abstract
Please log in.
Hironori Inomata, Masaki Kawasaki, and Shun Kudo
: pp. 650-659
Reservoir Operation for Water Supply Considering Operational Ensemble Hydrological Predictions
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Nohara and Tomoharu Hori
: pp. 660-667
Collaborative and Adaptive Dam Operation for Flood Control
Abstract
Please log in.
Kenji Someya
: pp. 668-676
Current and Future Study Topics on Reservoir Sediment Management by Bypass Tunnels
Abstract
Please log in.
Sohei Kobayashi, Takahiro Koshiba, and Tetsuya Sumi
: pp. 677-690
Free-Flow Sediment Flushing: Insights from Prototype-Scale Studies
Abstract
Please log in.
Taymaz Esmaeili, Tetsuya Sumi, Sameh A. Kantoush, and Yoji Kubota
: pp. 691-701
Effectiveness of Flexible Dam Operation and Sediment Replenishment at Managawa Dam, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Katsumi Matsushima, Makoto Hyodo, Noriyuki Shibata, and Yoshihiro Shimizu
: pp. 702-708
Planning and Analysis of Sedimentation Countermeasures in Hydropower Dams Considering Properties of Reservoir Sedimentation
Abstract
Please log in.
Chihaya Onda, Tetsuya Sumi, and Tsuyoshi Asahi
: pp. 709-719
Environmental Impact Assessment Plan Due to Sediment Sluicing at Dams Along Mimikawa River System
Abstract
Please log in.
Takeshi Yoshimura and Hiroki Shinya
: pp. 720-732
Evaluation of Diverse Values of Hydropower
Abstract
Please log in.
Motoyuki Inoue

Special Issue on Infectious Disease Control in SATREPS Projects

: pp. 733-734
Infectious Disease Control in SATREPS Projects
Sumio Shinoda

The Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) is a Japanese government program that promotes international joint research. The program is structured as a collaboration between the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The program includes various fields, such as Environment and Energy, Bioresources, Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, and Infectious Disease Control, and a total 52 projects were currently in progress as of May, 2018.

It is expected that the promotion of international joint research under this program will enable Japanese research institutions to conduct research more effectively in fields and having targets that make it advantageous to do that research in developing countries, including countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia, and Africa.

Recently, SATREPS projects in the field of Infectious Disease have been but under the control of the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED). Although adult maladies, such as malignant tumors, heart disease, and cerebral apoplexy, are major causes of death in the developed countries including Japan, infectious diseases are still responsible for the high mortality rates in developing countries. Therefore, Infectious Disease Control is the important field of SATREPS.

Infectious Disease Control projects are progressing in several countries, including Kenya, Zambia, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Brazil, and various infectious diseases and pathogens have been targeted.

In this special issue on Infectious Disease Control, the following reports from three projects have been selected: “The JICA-AMED SATREPS Project to Control Outbreaks of Yellow Fever and Rift Valley Fever in Kenya” by Nagasaki University, “Comprehensive Etiological and Epidemiological Study on Acute Respiratory Infections in Children in the Philippines” by Tohoku University, and “International Joint Research on Antifungal Resistant Fungi in Brazil” by Chiba University. These projects include viral, bacterial, and fungal infections.

If they become available, further supplementary reports from other projects in this field will be published in a future issue.

: pp. 735-739
Approaches of the JICA-AMED SATREPS Project to Controlling Outbreaks of Yellow Fever and Rift Valley Fever in Kenya
Abstract
Please log in.
Shingo Inoue
: pp. 740-750
Comprehensive Etiological and Epidemiological Study on Acute Respiratory Infections in Children: Providing Evidence for the Prevention and Control of Childhood Pneumonia in the Philippines
Abstract
Please log in.
Raita Tamaki, Veronica L. Tallo, Alvin G. Tan, Mark Donald C. Reñosa, Portia P. Alday, Jhoys M. Landicho, Marianette T. Inobaya, Mayuko Saito, Taro Kamigaki, Michiko Okamoto, Mariko Saito, Clyde Dapat, Bindongo P. P. Dembele, Mary Lorraine S. Mationg, Melisa U. Mondoy, Socorro P. Lupisan, and Hitoshi Oshitani
: pp. 751-753
International Joint Research on Antifungal Resistant Fungi: Collaborative Studies with the University of Campinas, Brazil
Abstract
Please log in.
Akira Watanabe and Katsuhiko Kamei

Regular Papers

: pp. 755-766
Community Proactivity in Disaster Preparation: Research Based on Two Communities in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Takaaki Hashimoto, Kaori Karasawa, Kazuyuki Hirayama, Masanori Wada, and Hiroshi Hosaka
: pp. 767-779
High Resolution Numerical Model for Salinity Transport in Rivers During a Tsunami Attack
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroshi Nagashima and Nozomu Yoneyama
: pp. 780-792
Effectiveness of the Submersible Embankment in Haor Area in Bangladesh
Abstract
Please log in.
Mohammad Hossain Mahtab, Miho Ohara, and Mohamed Rasmy
: pp. 793-803
Floods in Southern Thailand in December 2016 and January 2017
Abstract
Please log in.
Taichi Tebakari, Sanit Wongsa, and Yoshiaki Hayashi
: pp. 804-812
Observed Hospital Damages Following the 2014 Mae Lao (Northern Thailand) Earthquake: A Survey Report
Abstract
Please log in.
Teraphan Ornthammarath and Titima Puavaranukroh
: pp. 813-816
The Earthquake in Ōsaka-Fu Hokubu on 18 June 2018 and its Ensuing Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoshi Hirata and Reo Kimura

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Application of GNSS for Mitigating Natural Disaster

Special Issue on Application of GNSS for Mitigating Natural Disaster

: p. 423
Application of GNSS for Mitigating Natural Disaster
Teruyuki Kato, Yusaku Ohta, and Hiroshi Munekane

The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has been utilized in a variety of research fields within the geosciences. This research has been further developed for application to hazard monitoring and natural disaster mitigation. Some developments have even been implemented in society in countermeasures against natural disasters. The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI), for example, has established a nationwide GNSS network called GEONET. The data from GEONET are used extensively among researchers and practitioners, not only for basic research but also for the development of methods and systems that can mitigate disasters. This special volume is a collection of articles that discuss how such methods and systems are now being developed and/or planned to both clarify the mechanisms behind natural hazards and mitigate the damage they may cause. The volume consists of 13 papers covering a wide range of natural phenomena, such as earthquakes, crustal movements, tsunamis, ionospheric disturbances, and volcanic eruptions. Some papers help us to understand how natural hazards behave, which should be the first step toward disaster mitigation. On the other hand, other articles report direct efforts made toward providing early warnings of impending disasters. Disaster mitigation systems may require real-time (and even kinematic with high-rate data sampling) processing and dissemination of data. Moreover, some applications involve data collection from coastal waters and the open sea. Now that the density of GNSS stations has approached saturation on land, the scarcity of data collected offshore will have to be rectified through the development of GNSS systems in the ocean. We do hope that this volume will be a step in the further progress of utilizing GNSS for disaster monitoring and mitigation in the future to make society safer and more secure.

: pp. 424-432
GEONET as Infrastructure for Disaster Mitigation
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiromichi Tsuji and Yuki Hatanaka
: pp. 433-439
A GNSS Kinematic Analysis System for Japanese GEONET Stations
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroshi Munekane
: pp. 440-452
Real-Time GNSS Analysis System REGARD: An Overview and Recent Results
Abstract
Please log in.
Satoshi Kawamoto, Naofumi Takamatsu, Satoshi Abe, Kohei Miyagawa, Yusaku Ohta, Masaru Todoriki, and Takuya Nishimura
: pp. 453-459
Role of Real-Time GNSS in Near-Field Tsunami Forecasting
Abstract
Please log in.
Yusaku Ohta, Takuya Inoue, Shunichi Koshimura, Satoshi Kawamoto, and Ryota Hino
: pp. 460-471
Development of GNSS Buoy for a Synthetic Geohazard Monitoring System
Abstract
Please log in.
Teruyuki Kato, Yukihiro Terada, Keiichi Tadokoro, Natsuki Kinugasa, Akira Futamura, Morio Toyoshima, Shin-ichi Yamamoto, Mamoru Ishii, Takuya Tsugawa, Michi Nishioka, Kenichi Takizawa, Yoshinori Shoji, and Hiromu Seko
: pp. 472-488
Onboard Realtime Processing of GPS-Acoustic Data for Moored Buoy-Based Observation
Abstract
Please log in.
Motoyuki Kido, Misae Imano, Yusaku Ohta, Tatsuya Fukuda, Narumi Takahashi, Satoshi Tsubone, Yasuhisa Ishihara, Hiroshi Ochi, Kentaro Imai, Chie Honsho, and Ryota Hino
: pp. 489-495
A Trial Application of Geodetic Data for Inland Fault Assessment – Coulomb Stress Changes Estimated from GNSS Surface Displacements
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuya Nishimura
: pp. 496-502
Postseismic Uplift Along the Pacific Coast of Tohoku and Kanto Districts Associated with the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Takeshi Iinuma
: pp. 503-510
Current Status of Postseismic Deformation Following the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Hisashi Suito
: pp. 511-517
Detection of Seafloor Movement in Subduction Zones Around Japan Using a GNSS-A Seafloor Geodetic Observation System from 2013 to 2016
Abstract
Please log in.
Tadashi Ishikawa and Yusuke Yokota
: pp. 518-525
Volcanic Activity of Sakurajima Monitored Using Global Navigation Satellite System
Abstract
Please log in.
Masato Iguchi
: pp. 526-534
GNSS Observation and Monitoring of the Hakone Volcano and the 2015 Unrest
Abstract
Please log in.
Ryosuke Doke, Masatake Harada, and Kazuki Miyaoka
: pp. 535-545
Total Electron Content Observations by Dense Regional and Worldwide International Networks of GNSS
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuya Tsugawa, Michi Nishioka, Mamoru Ishii, Kornyanat Hozumi, Susumu Saito, Atsuki Shinbori, Yuichi Otsuka, Akinori Saito, Suhaila M. Buhari, Mardina Abdullah, and Pornchai Supnithi

Regular Papers

: pp. 547-558
Response of the Tourism Industry to Volcanic Hazard Information: A Case Study of the Volcanic Warning at Zao Volcano in 2015
Abstract
Please log in.
Miwa Kuri, Amy Donovan, Anawat Suppasri, and Tetsuya Torayashiki
: pp. 559-563
Effects of Framing on Earthquake Risk Perception in Chiang Rai, Thailand
Abstract
Please log in.
Narongdej Intaratchaiyakit and Supot Teachavorasinskun
: pp. 564-570
A Commentary on “Recovery from Catastrophe and Building Back Better (Takeuchi and Tanaka, 2016)” – Structure of Damage of Production Capital Stock on Normative Economic Process
Abstract
Please log in.
Muneta Yokomatsu
: pp. 571-573
Response to Discussion by Muneta Yokomatsu on Kuniyoshi Takeuchi and Shigenobu Tanaka: Recovery from Catastrophe and Building Back Better, JDR Vol.11 No.6, pp. 1190-1201, Dec. 2016
Abstract
Please log in.
Kuniyoshi Takeuchi and Shigenobu Tanaka

No.2

(Mar)

The Third JDR Award
Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 3

The Third JDR Award

: p. 229
Congratulations! The Third JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
: p. 230
Presenting the Third JDR Award
Haruo Hayashi
: p. 231
Message from the Winner
Shunichi Koshimura

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 3

: p. 233
Disaster and Big Data Part 3
Shunichi Koshimura

The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster left behind many lessons to learn, and there have since been many new findings and insights that have led to suggestions made and implemented in disaster observation, sensing, simulation, and damage determination. The challenges for mitigating the damage from future catastrophic natural disasters, such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Earthquake or the Nankai Trough Earthquake and Tsunami, are in how we share our visions of the possible impacts, how we prepare to mitigate the losses and damages, and how we enhance society’s disaster resilience.

The huge amount of information obtained, called “disaster big data,” is related to the dynamic movement, as IoT, of a large number people, vehicles, and goods from inside and outside the affected areas. This has dramatically facilitated our understanding of how our society has responded to unprecedented catastrophes. The key question is how to utilize big data in establishing social systems that respond promptly, sensibly, and effectively to natural disasters, and in withstanding adversity with resilience.

Researchers with various types of expertise are working together under a collaborative project called JST CREST “Establishing the advanced disaster reduction management system by fusion of real-time disaster simulation and big data assimilation.” The project aims to identify possible earthquake and tsunami disaster scenarios that occur and progress in a chained or compound manner and to create new technologies to lead responses and disaster mitigation measures to help society to recover from disasters.

As we have published two previous special issues entitled “Disaster and Big Data” since 2016, this issue is our third. Included are 14 papers that aim to share the recent progress of the project as the sequel to Part 2, published in March 2017. As one of the guest editors of this issue, I would like to express our deep gratitude for the insightful comments and suggestions made by the reviewers and the members of the editorial committee. I do hope that this work will be utilized in disaster management efforts to mitigate the damage and losses in future catastrophic disasters.

: pp. 234-244
A Real-Time Tsunami Inundation Forecast System Using Vector Supercomputer SX-ACE
Abstract
Please log in.
Akihiro Musa, Takashi Abe, Takuya Inoue, Hiroaki Hokari, Yoichi Murashima , Yoshiyuki Kido, Susumu Date, Shinji Shimojo, Shunichi Koshimura, and Hiroaki Kobayashi
: pp. 245-253
Selection of Tsunami Observation Points Suitable for Database-Driven Prediction
Abstract
Please log in.
Junichi Taniguchi, Kyohei Tagawa, Masashi Yoshikawa, Yasuhiko Igarashi, Tsuneo Ohsumi, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Takane Hori, Masato Okada, and Toshitaka Baba
: pp. 254-261
Cluster Analysis of Long-Period Ground-Motion Simulation Data with Application to Nankai Trough Megathrust Earthquake Scenarios
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Maeda, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Toshihiko Hayakawa, Satsuki Shimono, and Sho Akagi
: pp. 262-271
Assessment of Street Network Accessibility in Tokyo Metropolitan Area After a Large Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshihiro Osaragi, Maki Kishimoto, and Takuya Oki
: pp. 272-280
Effects of Firefighting Activities Performed by Local Residents to Mitigate Fire Destruction Damage and Human Casualties in Large Earthquakes
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuya Oki and Toshihiro Osaragi
: pp. 281-290
Extraction of Collapsed Bridges Due to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake from Post-Event SAR Images
Abstract
Please log in.
Wen Liu and Fumio Yamazaki
: pp. 291-302
Identifying Building Damage Patterns in the 2016 Meinong, Taiwan Earthquake Using Post-Event Dual-Polarimetric ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Imagery
Abstract
Please log in.
Yanbing Bai, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 303-312
Detection of Pedestrian Flow Using Mobile Devices for Evacuation Guiding in Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomoya Kitazato, Miku Hoshino, Masaki Ito, and Kaoru Sezaki
: pp. 313-320
Development and Evaluation of a Search Support Portal for Public Videos Related to the Great East Japan Earthquake: “3.11 Video Portal – Great East Japan Earthquake Public Footage Finder”
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato, Toru Okamoto, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 321-325
An Analysis of Web Coverage on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato, Fumihiko Imamura, and Masahiro Iwasaki
: pp. 326-337
State-Space Model for Traffic State Estimation of a Two-Dimensional Network
Abstract
Please log in.
Yosuke Kawasaki, Yusuke Hara, and Masao Kuwahara
: pp. 338-346
An Analysis Technique of Evacuation Simulation Using an Array DBMS
Abstract
Please log in.
Yusuke Kawai, Jing Zhao, Kento Sugiura, Yoshiharu Ishikawa, and Yukiko Wakita
: pp. 347-357
Hybrid System for Generating Data on Human Flow in a Tsunami Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Takehiro Kashiyama, Yoshihide Sekimoto, Masao Kuwahara, Takuma Mitani, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 358-366
Comparative Analysis of Mobile Space Statistics Data and Questionnaire Survey Data to Detect Tsunami Evacuation Behavior: Case of Fukushima Earthquake Tsunami in Ishinomaki City and Watari Town, Miyagi Prefecture
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoki Togawa, Shosuke Sato, and Fumihiko Imamura

Regular Papers

: pp. 367-379
Study on Disaster Emergency Provisions in the Constitution of Japan as a Measure Against Huge Disasters – A Discussion Based on Initial and Emergency Responses to the Great East Japan Earthquake (Earthquake and Tsunami) –
Abstract
Please log in.
Akira Kotaki and Fumio Takeda
: pp. 380-386
Development of GIS Integrated Big Data Research Toolbox (BigGIS-RTX) for Mobile CDR Data Processing in Disasters Management
Abstract
Please log in.
Ko Ko Lwin, Yoshihide Sekimoto, and Wataru Takeuchi
: pp. 387-395
Using Agent Simulations to Evaluate the Effect of a Regional BCP on Disaster Response
Abstract
Please log in.
Zijian Liu and Takeyasu Suzuki
: pp. 396-409
Hydrological Simulation of Small River Basins in Northern Kyushu, Japan, During the Extreme Rainfall Event of July 5–6, 2017
Abstract
Please log in.
Shakti P. C., Tsuyoshi Nakatani, and Ryohei Misumi

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project: Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform

Special Issue on SATREPS Myanmar Project: Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform

: p. 5
SATREPS Myanmar Project: Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform
Kimiro Meguro and Gokon Hideomi

This special issue summarizes the main results of the first half of the five-year SATREPS project in Myanmar. SATREPS stands for “Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development” and it is supported by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). The title of our project is “Construction of Myanmar Disaster Response Enhancement System and Industry-Academia-Government Cooperation Platform.” Ours is the first SATREPS project in Myanmar and Yangon Technological University (YTU) is our main counterpart institute and relevant organizations mainly national and local governments are collaborating as strategic partners.

In Myanmar, rural and urban development has been progressing rapidly and on a large scale, and the expansion of urban population coupled with climate change has increased the risk of disaster to a critical level, especially in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city. By monitoring changes in the urban environment, such as the topography, ground, buildings, and infrastructure, we seek to lower the level of risk. Our project will improve the disaster management system, plan and response capability, based on an evaluation of disaster vulnerabilities. Considering floods including tidal wave problems and earthquakes as the target hazards, we aim to contribute to the development of precise regional development plans and disaster management measures by identifying disaster risks in advance, and we will support the Myanmar government in strengthening its disaster response capabilities.

We plan to set up a system by which industry, academia, and the government collaborate to promote the understanding of research content, to continue research activities, and to implement research results in Myanmar. We hope that our activities in the SATREPS project will become an ideal model for solving issues in urban development and disaster management, and that the project will also contribute the other Asian countries.

: pp. 6-13
Estimation of Originating-Destination Trips in Yangon by Using Big Data Source
Abstract
Please log in.
Thein Aye Zin, Kyaing, Ko Ko Lwin, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
: pp. 14-21
Flood Hazard Assessment of Bago River Basin, Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
Win Win Zin, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Wataru Takeuchi, Zin Mar Lar Tin San, Kyaw Zaya Htun, Thet Hnin Aye, and Shelly Win
: pp. 22-30
Preliminary Assessment of GPM Satellite Rainfall over Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
Muhammad Mohsan, Ralph Allen Acierto, Akiyuki Kawasaki, and Win Win Zin
: pp. 31-39
Development of Fragility Functions of RC Buildings in Yangon City Using Push over Analysis
Abstract
Please log in.
Chaitanya Krishna Gadagamma, Aung Ko Min, Hideomi Gokon, Kimiro Meguro, and Khin Than Yu
: pp. 40-49
Structure Deformation Measurement with Terrestrial Laser Scanner at Pathein Bridge in Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
Nuntikorn Kitratporn, Wataru Takeuchi, Koji Matsumoto, and Kohei Nagai
: pp. 50-61
Land Cover Change Simulations in Yangon Under Several Scenarios of Flood and Earthquake Vulnerabilities with Master Plan
Abstract
Please log in.
Tanakorn Sritarapipat and Wataru Takeuchi
: pp. 62-69
A Comparison of Disaster Management Plans for Both Japan and Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
Rena Kikuchi, Muneyoshi Numada, May Myat Mon, Tun Naing, Khin Than Yu, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 70-79
Data Communication for Efficient Water Resource Management Among Multiple Stakeholders – A Case Study in the Bago River Basin, Myanmar –
Abstract
Please log in.
Naruhiko Shirai, Seemanta Sharma Bhagabati, Akira Kodaka, Naohiko Kohtake, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Ralph Allen Acierto, and Win Win Zin
: pp. 80-87
A Simple Monitoring System for Damaged Bridges in Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
Liyanto Eddy, Takeshi Miyashita, Koji Matsumoto, Kohei Nagai, and Win Bo
: pp. 88-98
Technology Transfer for Safe and Sustainable Road Bridge Life Cycle Management in Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
Michael Henry, Chika Yamasaki, Kohei Nagai, Koji Matsumoto, and Hiroshi Yokota
: pp. 99-115
Analysis of Disaster Response During Landslide Disaster in Hakha, Chin State of Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
May Myat Mon, Tun Naing, Muneyoshi Numada, Khin Than Yu, Kimiro Meguro, and Kyaw Zin Latt
: pp. 116-124
Development of a Hydrological Telemetry System in Bago River
Abstract
Please log in.
Ralph Allen Acierto, Akiyuki Kawasaki, Win Win Zin, Aung Than Oo, Khon Ra, and Daisuke Komori
: pp. 125-137
Understanding Regional Building Characteristics in Yangon Based on Digital Building Model
Abstract
Please log in.
Osamu Murao, Takuma Usuda, Hideomi Gokon, Kimiro Meguro, Wataru Takeuchi, Kazuya Sugiyasu, and Khin Than Yu
: pp. 138-151
Response-Capacity Analysis of Urban Systems to Support Emergency and Disaster Response in a Developing City: The Case of Yangon, Myanmar
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasmin Bhattacharya, Takaaki Kato, Tomoko Matsushita, Ei Ei Tun, and Tin Tin Aye

Regular Papers

: pp. 153-167
Seismic Hazard in Syria Based on Completeness Analysis and Assessment
Abstract
Please log in.
Ahmed Alhourani, Junji Kiyono, Aiko Furukawa, and Hussam Eldein Zaineh
: pp. 168-176
Self-Extensional Space in Relocated Housing After 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami: Case Study of Namkem Community, PhangNga, Thailand
Abstract
Please log in.
Titaya Sararit
: pp. 177-192
Study on Disaster Prevention Countermeasures and Examples for Local Governments in Consideration of Regional Characteristics
Abstract
Please log in.
Shinya Miura, Hiroaki Sano, Nobuyuki Handa, Tai-Young Yi, Hitoshi Taguchi, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 193-198
3-D Gravity Basement Structure Around Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Shun Araki, Tatsuya Noguchi, Masao Komazawa, Shoya Arimura, Mitsuhiro Tamura, Kei Nakayama, Hitoshi Morikawa, Takashi Miyamoto, Kahori Iiyama, Yoshiya Hata, Masayuki Yoshimi, Takao Kagawa, and Hiroyuki Goto
: pp. 199-204
Change in Disaster-Prevention Consciousness Brought by Serious Damage from a Large Scale Disaster: Studying the Kumamoto Earthquake in 2016
Abstract
Please log in.
Miki Ozeki and Kan Shimazaki
: pp. 205-215
Study on the Mechanism of the Peculiar Behaviors of the Aratozawa Dam During the 2008 Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Nario Yasuda, Norihisa Matsumoto, and Zengyan Cao

Vol.12 (2017)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Communicating Hazard and Risk: From Scientific Information to Community Involvement

Special Issue on Communicating Hazard and Risk: From Scientific Information to Community Involvement

: p. 1097
Communicating Hazard and Risk: From Scientific Information to Community Involvement
Naoshi Hirata, Reo Kimura, and Shoji Ohtomo

Hazard and risk researchers are using their research results to target several vastly different stakeholders: the scientific community, governmental institutions, engineers and the larger technical community, companies, and finally the local residents. Each of these groups has a different focus on the results and is drawing different conclusions from them. In this special issue for the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), we address the problems surrounding hazard and risk communication by asking important questions. How can we communicate hazard and/or risk to the public? How can we involve communities in risk assessment? How can we raise the acceptance of risk models in communities? How can communities be involved in mitigation measures? Finally, how can we explain the inherit uncertainties of hazard and risk assessments? To answer these questions, it is essential to integrate knowledge from the social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering.

As the first step in this effort, we selected seven papers in the present special issue: six are related to the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes in Japan and one to a research in Taiwan. They include studies on hazard and risk estimates before the disaster, risk communication during the earthquake sequence by the Japan Metrological Agency, the psychological and behavioral characteristics of disaster victims, resident evacuation patterns, the recovery process, and risk communication in disaster. The paper of the research in Taiwan addresses the importance of resident involvement to earthquake science for disaster preparedness.

: pp. 1098-1108
Has 20 Years of Japanese Earthquake Research Enhanced Seismic Disaster Resilience in Kumamoto?
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoshi Hirata
: pp. 1109-1116
New Japanese Guidelines for the Information of the Prospect of Seismic Activity After Large Earthquakes and Their Applications
Abstract
Please log in.
Noriko Kamaya, Kiyoshi Takeda, and Tetsuo Hashimoto
: pp. 1117-1138
A Study on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake: Citizen’s Evaluation of Earthquake Information and Their Evacuation and Sheltering Behaviors
Abstract
Please log in.
Reo Kimura, Shoji Ohtomo, and Naoshi Hirata
: pp. 1139-1150
The Influences of Residents’ Evacuation Patterns in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake on Public Risk Perceptions and Trust Toward Authorities
Abstract
Please log in.
Shoji Ohtomo, Reo Kimura, and Naoshi Hirata
: pp. 1151-1160
The Importance of Seismic Death Risk Assessment of Households in the Kumamoto Earthquake of 2016
Abstract
Please log in.
Tadayoshi Nakashima, Shigeyuki Okada, and Akane Shinoda
: pp. 1161-1173
Time-Series Analysis of Workload for Support in Rebuilding Disaster Victims’ Lives – Comparison of the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake with the 2007 Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake –
Abstract
Please log in.
Munenari Inoguchi, Keiko Tamura, Haruo Hayashi, and Keisuke Shimizu
: pp. 1174-1181
Citizen Earthquake Science in Taiwan: From Science to Hazard Mitigation
Abstract
Please log in.
Wen-Tzong Liang, Jian-Cheng Lee, Kate Huihsuan Chen, and Nai-Chi Hsiao

Regular Papers

: pp. 1182-1191
Control Change Cause Analysis-Based Fault Diagnostic Approach
Abstract
Please log in.
Gang-Gang Wu, Zong-Xiao Yang, Gen-Sheng Li, and Lei Song
: pp. 1192-1202
Participatory Multi-Stakeholder Platforms in Disaster Management in South Africa
Abstract
Please log in.
Nosiphiwe P. Ngqwala, C. Sunitha Srinivas, Roman Tandlich, Desmond M. Pyle, and Rene Oosthuizen
: pp. 1203-1214
Role of JPF in the Support of Disaster Victims of the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake: Challenges Faced
Abstract
Please log in.
Ayako Yachida
: pp. 1215-1225
Duration of Strong Motion Exceeding Bridge Design Spectra in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Nobuoto Nojima and Taiki Yamamoto

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Researches on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2017
Mini Special Issue on Cyber Security

Special Issue on NIED Frontier Researches on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2017

: p. 843
NIED Frontier Researches on Science and Technology for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience 2017
Haruo Hayashi and Yuichiro Usuda

In April 2016, our institute, NIED, under its new English name the “National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience,” commenced its fourth mid-to-long term planning period, set to last seven years.

We are constantly required to carry out comprehensive efforts, including observations, forecasts, experiments, assessments, and countermeasures related to a variety of natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, landslides, heavy rains, blizzards, and ice storms.

Since this is NIED’s first special issue for the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), works were collected on a wide variety of topics from research divisions and centers as well as from ongoing projects in order to give an overview of the latest achievements of the institute. We are delighted to present 17 papers on five topics: seismic disasters, volcanic disasters, climatic disasters, landslide disasters, and the development of comprehensive Information Communications Technology (ICT) for disaster management. Even though the achievements detailed in these papers are certainly the results individual research, NIED hopes to maximize these achievements for the promotion of science and technology for disaster risk reduction and resilience as a whole. It is our hope that this special issue awakens the readers’ interest in a study, and, of course, creates an opportunity for further collaborative works with us.

: pp. 844-857
Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure Beneath Japanese Islands and Surroundings Based on NIED Seismic Networks Using both Inland and Offshore Events
Abstract
Please log in.
Makoto Matsubara, Hiroshi Sato, Kenji Uehira, Masashi Mochizuki, and Toshihiko Kanazawa
: pp. 858-867
Study on Performance Evaluation of MEMS Sensors and Data Integration Methods for Expected Use to Determine Damage Degrees of Existing Structures
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomohiro Sasaki, Koichi Kajiwara, Takuzo Yamashita, and Takuya Toyoshi
: pp. 868-881
Large-Scale Shake Table Test on Behavior of Underground Structure with the Curved Portion During an Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Yohsuke Kawamata, Manabu Nakayama, Ikuo Towhata, and Susumu Yasuda
: pp. 882-890
Development of a Virtual Reality Experience System for Interior Damage Due to an Earthquake – Utilizing E-Defense Shake Table Test –
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuzo Yamashita, Mahendra Kumar Pal, Kazutoshi Matsuzaki, and Hiromitsu Tomozawa
: pp. 891-898
Investigation of Offshore Fault Modeling for a Source Region Related to the Shakotan-Oki Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Tsuneo Ohsumi and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 899-915
Investigation of Damages in Immediate Vicinity of Co-Seismic Faults During the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Shohei Naito, Ken Xiansheng Hao, Shigeki Senna, Takuma Saeki, Hiromitsu Nakamura, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, and Takashi Azuma
: pp. 916-925
Differences Between Scientific Prediction and Subjective Expectation of Focal Region and Seismic Intensity of Nankai Trough Giant Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Kan Shimazaki and Yoshinobu Mizui
: pp. 926-931
NIED’s V-net, the Fundamental Volcano Observation Network in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshikazu Tanada, Hideki Ueda, Masashi Nagai, and Motoo Ukawa
: pp. 932-943
Relationship Between b-Value Distribution and the Magma Plumbing System in and Around Mt. Tarumae, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Keita Chiba, Hideki Ueda, and Toshikazu Tanada
: pp. 944-955
Assimilation Impact of Different GPS Analysis Methods on Precipitation Forecast: A Heavy Rainfall Case Study of Kani City, Gifu Prefecture on July 15, 2010
Abstract
Please log in.
Shingo Shimizu, Seiichi Shimada, and Kazuhisa Tsuboki
: pp. 956-966
Analysis of the 6 September 2015 Tornadic Storm Around the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Using Coupled 3DVAR and Incremental Analysis Updates
Abstract
Please log in.
Ken-ichi Shimose, Shingo Shimizu, Ryohei Kato, and Koyuru Iwanami
: pp. 967-979
Very Short Time Range Forecasting Using CReSS-3DVAR for a Meso-γ-Scale, Localized, Extremely Heavy Rainfall Event: Comparison with an Extrapolation-Based Nowcast
Abstract
Please log in.
Ryohei Kato, Shingo Shimizu, Ken-ichi Shimose, and Koyuru Iwanami
: pp. 980-992
Real-Time Prediction Method for Slope Failure Caused by Rainfall Using Slope Monitoring Records
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomohiro Ishizawa, Toru Danjo, and Naoki Sakai
: pp. 993-1001
Characteristics of Groundwater Response to Precipitation for Landslide Prevention at Kiyomizu-Dera
Abstract
Please log in.
Toru Danjo, Tomohiro Ishizawa, Masamitsu Fujimoto, Naoki Sakai, and Ryoichi Fukagawa
: pp. 1002-1014
Effects and Issues of Information Sharing System for Disaster Response
Abstract
Please log in.
Yuichiro Usuda, Makoto Hanashima, Ryota Sato, and Hiroaki Sano
: pp. 1015-1027
The Standardized Disaster-Information Products for Disaster Management: Concept and Formulation
Abstract
Please log in.
Makoto Hanashima, Ryota Sato, and Yuichiro Usuda
: pp. 1028-1038
Consideration on Utilization of Information in Disaster Response Site – Based on Information Support for 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes –
Abstract
Please log in.
Tadashi Ise, Takuya Takahashi, Ryota Sato, Hiroaki Sano, Takeshi Isono, Makoto Hanashima, and Yuichiro Usuda

Mini Special Issue on Cyber Security

: p. 1039
Cyber Security
Kenji Watanabe

As our daily lives and socioeconomic activities have increasingly come to depend on information systems and networks, the impact of disruptions to these systems and networks have also become more complex and diversified.

In urban areas, where people, goods, money, and information are highly concentrated, the possibility of chain failures and confusion beyond our expectations and experience is especially high.

The vulnerabilities in our systems and networks on have become the targets of cyber attacks, which have come to cause socioeconomic problems with increasing likelihood. To counter these attacks, technological countermeasures alone are insufficient, and countermeasures such as the development of professional skills and organizational response capabilities as well as the implementation of cyber security schemes based on public-private partnerships (PPP) at the national level must be carried out as soon as possible.

In this JDR mini special issue on Cyber Security, I have tried to expand the scope of traditional cyber security discussions with mainly technological aspects. I have also succeeded in including non-technological aspects to provide feasible measures that will help us to prepare for, respond to, and recover from socioeconomic damage caused by advancing cyber attacks.

Finally, I am truly grateful for the authors’ insightful contributions and the referees’ acute professional advice, which together make this JDR mini special issue a valuable contribution to making our society more resilient to incoming cyber attacks.

: pp. 1040-1049
Proposal for a Risk Communication-Based Approach to IT Risk
Abstract
Please log in.
Ryoichi Sasaki
: pp. 1050-1059
Proposal on Measure Against Cyberattack on the Basis of Recent Trend
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoshi Sato
: pp. 1060-1072
Improvement of Verification of a Model Supporting Decision-Making on Information Security Risk Treatment by Using Statistical Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Ritsuko Aiba and Takeshi Hiromatsu
: pp. 1073-1080
Study on High Resilient Structures for IoT Systems to Detect Accidents
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideyuki Shintani, Tomomi Aoyama, and Ichiro Koshijima
: pp. 1081-1090
On the Complexity of Cybersecurity Exercises Proportional to Preparedness
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomomi Aoyama, Toshihiko Nakano, Ichiro Koshijima, Yoshihiro Hashimoto, and Kenji Watanabe

No.sp

(Jun)

Special Issue on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes

Special Issue on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes

: p. 645
the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes
Haruo Hayashi

At 9:26 pm on April 14, 2016, a magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck directly beneath Kumamoto prefecture, Japan, producing a seismic intensity level (JMA) of 7 in Mashiki Town. Although the earthquake damage forecasting system in operation at the time predicted that this earthquake would cause no damage, it resulted in extensive human casualties and property damage centered in Mashiki Town. Past midnight on April 16, 28 hours after the first shock, the second and main shock hit, which recorded magnitude 7.3 and was the strongest recorded urban earthquake in Japan since 1995. The hypocenter extended from Kumamoto prefecture to Oita prefecture, cutting across the island of Kyushu. Mount Aso also saw increased volcanic activities which led to several landslides. This resulted in the collapse of the Great Aso Bridge, an important transportation point, causing the loss of human lives as well as obstruction of traffic for an extended period. Much confusion arose in the process of implementing measures in response to the earthquakes, which produced damage in urban areas as well as hilly and mountainous regions, raising many issues and prompting several new approaches.

Researchers in many fields have conducted various activities at the disaster sites in the one-year period following the earthquakes, and produced significant findings in many areas. In order to make these results available to the wider global community, JDR is releasing a special issue on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes with excellent papers and reports to mark their one-year anniversary. While the submitted papers to this special issue went through our regular peer review process, no publication charge was imposed so as to encourage as many submissions as possible.

It is our hope that this special issue will contribute to throwing light on the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes in its entirety.

: pp. 646-655
Machine Learning Based Building Damage Mapping from the ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 SAR Imagery: Case Study of 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Yanbing Bai, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 656-668
Simple Estimation Method for the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake’s Direct Damage Amount
Abstract
Please log in.
Qinglin Cui, Mingji Cui, Toshihisa Toyoda, and Hitoshi Taniguchi
: pp. 669-677
The Evacuation of Thai Citizens During Japan’s 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes: An ICT Perspective
Abstract
Please log in.
Natt Leelawat, Anawat Suppasri, Panon Latcharote and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 678-687
Emergency Evacuation and Shelter-Seeking Behavior of Foreign Residents in Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Zi Yang, Keiko Inagaki, Hiromitsu Yagi, Satoshi Yoshida, and Satoru Sadohara
: pp. 688-695
Damage of Enterprises and Their Business Continuity in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroaki Maruya and Tetsuya Torayashiki
: pp. 696-707
Construction of Participatory Surveying System for Specialists and Utilization of Geoportal
Abstract
Please log in.
Yuki Okajima, Yasuhiro Mitani, Hiro Ikemi, and Ibrahim Djamaluddin

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Resilience Science and Resilience Engineering to Enhance Resilience in Shikoku Region of Japan

Special Issue on Resilience Science and Resilience Engineering to Enhance Resilience in Shikoku Region of Japan

: p. 711
Resilience Science and Resilience Engineering to Enhance Resilience in Shikoku Region of Japan
Yoshiyuki Kaneda and Chikako Isouchi

Japan has one of the highest levels of seismicity in the world. In the last few decades, Japan has been the site of many destructive earthquakes, such as the 1995 Kobe earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, 2004 Chuetsu earthquake, 2007 Chuetsu-oki earthquake, and 2016 Kumamoto earthquake/Tottori-chubu earthquakes.

Furthermore, we need to take disaster mitigation countermeasures in preparation for the next Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake, Tokyo earthquake, etc. Disaster countermeasures against these earthquakes will be of vital importance to Japanese society in the future.

As a specific example, if and when the next Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake strikes, it will cause widespread and compound disasters on the island of Shikoku and in southwestern Japan in general. The prefectures of Kagawa, Tokushima, Kochi, and Ehime are all on the island of Shikoku, yet the damages that a future Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake will cause are predicted to be quite different in each prefecture. Therefore, in preparing disaster mitigation strategies for the coming Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake, these four prefectures and the distinguished universities involved in disaster mitigation research and education in them must be united in collaboration while making the best use of the individual characteristics of the prefectures and universities.

Specifically, in terms of disaster mitigation preparations, universities on Shikoku have to develop and advance resilience science as it relates to upcoming disasters from a Nankai Trough megathrust earthquake, inland earthquakes, typhoons, floods, etc.

In this special issue, many significant research papers from the fields of engineering, geoscience, and the social sciences by researchers from distinguished universities on the island of Shikoku focus on resilience science. We must apply their findings to society, putting them into practice to mitigate potential damages from any future natural events.

: pp. 712-721
Resilience Science for a Resilience Society in Seismogenic and Tsunamigenic Countries
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshiyuki Kaneda
: pp. 722-732
A Proposed Restoration Strategy for Road Networks After an Earthquake Disaster Using Resilience Engineering
Abstract
Please log in.
Wataru Shiraki, Kyosuke Takahashi, Hitoshi Inomo, and Chikako Isouchi
: pp. 733-740
District Continuity Plans for Large-Scale Disaster Coordination: Case Study in Kagawa District
Abstract
Please log in.
Chikako Isouchi
: pp. 741-747
Preliminary Study on Long-Term Flooding After the Tsunami
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshitaka Baba, Junichi Taniguchi, Noriko Kusunoki, Manabu Miyoshi, and Hiroshi Aki
: pp. 748-754
An Analytical Study on Intentions of Disaster Prevention Expert Candidates
Abstract
Please log in.
Toru Futagami, Tsuyoshi Hatori, and Netra P. Bhandary
: pp. 755-765
Resilience Efforts in the Kochi Prefecture in Preparation for the Nankai Trough Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Tadashi Hara
: pp. 766-774
Real-Time Tsunami Prediction System Using DONET
Abstract
Please log in.
Narumi Takahashi, Kentaro Imai, Masanobu Ishibashi, Kentaro Sueki, Ryoko Obayashi, Tatsuo Tanabe, Fumiyasu Tamazawa, Toshitaka Baba, and Yoshiyuki Kaneda
: pp. 775-781
Earthquake and Tsunami Scenarios as Basic Information to Prepare Next Nankai Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
Please log in.
Takane Hori
: pp. 782-791
Experience-Based Training in Earthquake Evacuation for School Teachers
Abstract
Please log in.
Kyosuke Takahashi, Hitoshi Inomo, Wataru Shiraki, Chikako Isouchi, and Mari Takahashi

Regular Papers

: pp. 793-805
A Study on Flood Forecasting in the Upper Indus Basin Considering Snow and Glacier Meltwater
Abstract
Please log in.
Tong Liu, Morimasa Tsuda, and Yoichi Iwami
: pp. 806-810
Area Business Continuity Management Approach to Build Sustainable Communities
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Ono and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 811-821
Contribution of Corporate Social Responsibility to Post-Disaster Life Recovery of Employees
Abstract
Please log in.
Maki Dan and Masayuki Kohiyama

No.3

(Jun)

Message from Editors-in-Chief
Special Issue on Infrastructure Maintenance, Renovation and Management

Message from Editors-in-Chief

: p. 393
Message from Editors-in-Chief
Haruo Hayashi

Special Issue on Infrastructure Maintenance, Renovation and Management

: pp. 394-395
Infrastructure Maintenance, Renovation and Management
Kazuo Kyuma, Yozo Fujino, and Kohei Nagai

Building a sustainable economy is one of Japan’s most pressing issues today, and the only path forward is through innovations in science and technology. Under the leadership of the Prime Minister and the Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, the Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (CSTI) has taken a high-altitude look across Japan’s ministries, proposing a comprehensive policy for science, technology, and innovation. As part of this policy, the SIP program has been designed as a fast-track research and development project, encompassing basic research, practical adoption, and commercialization. This nationally-sponsored program for science and technology innovation crosses the traditional framework of Japan’s ministries and agencies, as well as the traditional boundaries of scientific disciplines. The SIP has identified 11 issues from the field of energy, next-generation infrastructure and regional resources in order to address social issues, revitalize the Japanese economy, and bolstering Japan’s industrial posture in the world. As one of eleven themes, a new R&D program named “Infrastructure maintenance, renovation and management” was launched in 2014. The new R&D program is a 5-years program covering various subjects with key technologies such as non-destructive testing, monitoring, robotics, long-term performance prediction, development of high-quality durable material for repair and replacement, and infrastructure management using advanced information and communication technologies (ICT). The program consists of 60 research projects involving universities, research institutes and industries. This initiative is expected to prevent further accidents and setting an example for efficient infrastructure maintenance by reducing the burden of maintenance works and costs. This special issue aims at introducing some of the activities of the ongoing SIP “Infrastructure maintenance, renovation and management.” We are delighted to see publication of twenty-one technical papers/reports on this theme. We hope that readers would find this special issue interesting and valuable; and we greatly appreciate the authors for their contributions.

: pp. 396-405
Long-Term Monitoring for ASR-Deteriorated PC Rigid-Frame Bridge
Abstract
Please log in.
Saiji Fukada, Minh Tuan Ha, Kazuyuki Torii, Makoto Tsuda, Shuzo Ura, and Teruhiko Sasatani
: pp. 406-414
Verification of Structural Performance of a Main Tower Inclined Suspension Bridge by Simple Monitoring and FE Analysis
Abstract
Please log in.
Carlos Arturo Liñan Panting, Kohei Nagai, Eiji Iwasaki, and Thein Nu
: pp. 415-421
Bridge Slab Damage Detection by Signal Processing of UHF-Band Ground Penetrating Radar Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Tsukasa Mizutani, Nagisa Nakamura, Takahiro Yamaguchi, Minoru Tarumi, Yusuke Ando, and Ikuo Hara
: pp. 422-431
Data Assimilation for Fatigue Life Assessment of RC Bridge Decks Coupled with Path-Integral-Mechanistic Model and Non-Destructive Inspection
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasushi Tanaka, Koichi Maekawa, Takuya Maeshima, Ichiro Iwaki, Takahiro Nishida, and Tomoki Shiotani
: pp. 432-445
Development of a Remotely Controlled Semi-Underwater Heavy Carrier Robot for Unmanned Construction Works
Abstract
Please log in.
Shin’ichi Yuta
: pp. 446-455
Vehicle Model Calibration in the Frequency Domain and its Application to Large-Scale IRI Estimation
Abstract
Please log in.
Boyu Zhao, Tomonori Nagayama, Masashi Toyoda, Noritoshi Makihata, Muneaki Takahashi, and Masataka Ieiri
: pp. 456-469
Improvement of Durability of Precast Concrete Member by Granulated Blast Furnace Slag Sand
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshiki Ayano, Takashi Fujii, Kyoji Niitani, Katsunori Takahashi, and Kazuyoshi Hosotani
: pp. 470-477
Wave-Guided Acoustic Emission Signals of Concrete Slab Obtained by Fatigue Testing on Wheel-Load Machine
Abstract
Please log in.
Mitsuharu Shiwa, Zhengwang Li, Takuya Maeshima, Yasuhiro Koda, and Yasushi Tanaka
: pp. 478-486
Influence of Corrosion Distribution on Estimation of Flexural Loading Capacity of Corroded RC Beams
Abstract
Please log in.
Takashi Yamamoto, Satoshi Takaya, and Toyo Miyagawa
: pp. 487-495
Evolution of Fatigue Damage in Wheel-Loading Tests Evaluated by 3D Elastic-Wave Tomography
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomoki Shiotani Hisafumi Asaue, Takahiro Nishida, Takuya Maeshima, and Yasushi Tanaka
: pp. 496-505
Application of Elastic-Wave Tomography to Repair Inspection in Deteriorated Concrete Structures
Abstract
Please log in.
Katsufumi Hashimoto, Tomoki Shiotani, Takahiro Nishida, and Toyoaki Miyagawa
: pp. 506-514
Mechanoluminescent Testing as an Efficient Inspection Technique for the Management of Infrastructures
Abstract
Please log in.
Akihito Yoshida, Linsheng Liu, Dong Tu, Shigenobu Kainuma, and Chao-Nan Xu
: pp. 515-525
Basic Investigation of Displacement Monitoring of Dams Following Earthquakes Based on SAR Satellite Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroyuki Sato, Takashi Sasaki, Masafumi Kondo, Toshihide Kobori, Aoi Onodera, Kazuo Yoshikawa, Daisuke Sango, and Yasunari Morita
: pp. 526-535
Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry for Disaster Monitoring of Harbor Facilities
Abstract
Please log in.
Ryo Natsuaki, Takuma Anahara, Tsuyoshi Kotoura, Yuudai Iwatsuka, Naoya Tomii, Hiroyuki Katayama, and Takeshi Nishihata
: pp. 536-545
Highly-Sensitive Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System for Remote Monitoring of Concrete Structures
Abstract
Please log in.
Kazuhiro Tsuno, Yutaka Akahori, Toshiya Yui, Hiromitsu Furukawa, Anri Watanabe, Makoto Fujimaki, Masanori Oto, Tsukuru Katsuyama, Yasuhiro Iguchi, Hiroshi Inada, and Hiroshi Minagawa
: pp. 546-556
High Spatial Resolution Survey Using Frequency-Shifted Feedback Laser for Transport Infrastructure Maintenance
Abstract
Please log in.
Takeharu Murakami, Norihito Saito, Yuichi Komachi, Kotaro Okamura, Takashi Michikawa, Michio Sakashita, Shigeru Kogure, Kiwamu Kase, Satoshi Wada, and Katsumi Midorikawa
: pp. 557-568
Water Leakage Detection System for Underground Pipes by Using Wireless Sensors and Machine Learning
Abstract
Please log in.
Shigeru Teruhi, Yo Yamaguchi, and Junichi Akahani
: pp. 569-577
A Planning Model for Optimal Deployment of Leak Sensors in a Water Pipeline Network
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasuhiro Arai, Akira Koizumi, Toyono Inakazu, and Wako Kawamura
: pp. 578-584
On-Site Non-Destructive Inspection of Bridges Using the 950 keV X-Band Electron Linac X-ray Source
Abstract
Please log in.
Mitsuru Uesaka, Yuki Mitsuya, Eiko Hashimoto, Katsuhiro Dobashi, Ryota Yano, Hiroaki Takeuchi, Jean-Michel Bereder, Joichi Kusano, Eiji Tanabe, Natsuyo Maruyama, Yukiya Hattori, Masahiro Tatewaka, Hironobu Ono, Kentaro Murata, Atsushi Koishikawa, Futoshi Kaibuki, Hideo Sakurai, Yoshichika Seki , Yoshinobu Oshima, and Masahiro Ishida
: pp. 585-592
Research and Development of a Non-Destructive Inspection Technique with a Compact Neutron Source
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshie Otake, Yoshichika Seki, Yasuo Wakabayashi, Yoshimasa Ikeda, Takao Hashiguchi, Yuichi Yoshimura, Hideyuki Sunaga, Atsushi Taketani, Maki Mizuta, Yoshinobu Oshima, and Masahiro Ishida
: pp. 593-606
Development of a Bridge Inspection Support System Using Two-Wheeled Multicopter and 3D Modeling Technology
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshiro Hada, Manabu Nakao, Moyuru Yamada, Hiroki Kobayashi, Naoyuki Sawasaki, Katsunori Yokoji, Satoshi Kanai, Fumiki Tanaka, Hiroaki Date, Sarthak Pathak, Atsushi Yamashita, Manabu Yamada, and Toshiya Sugawara

Regular Papers

: pp. 607-616
Sensitivity Analysis of Depth-Integrated Numerical Models for Estimating Landslide Movement
Abstract
Please log in.
Teuku Faisal Fathani, Djoko Legono, and Muhammad Ahnaf Alfath
: pp. 617-630
Assessment of Sedimentation in Wlingi and Lodoyo Reservoirs: A Secondary Disaster Following the 2014 Eruption of Mt. Kelud, Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Fahmi Hidayat, Pitojo T. Juwono, Agus Suharyanto, Alwafi Pujiraharjo, Djoko Legono, Dian Sisinggih, David Neil, Masaharu Fujita, and Tetsuya Sumi
: pp. 631-638
Exploring Elements of Disaster Prevention Consciousness: Based on Interviews with Anti-disaster Professionals
Abstract
Please log in.
Miki Ozeki, Kan Shimazaki, and Taiyoung Yi

No.2

(Mar)

The Second JDR Award
Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 2

The Second JDR Award

: p. 222
Congratulations! The Second JDR Award
Editors-in-Chief, Haruo Hayashi
: p. 223
Presenting the Second JDR Award
Tomoyuki Takahashi
: p. 224
Message from the Winner
Harry Yeh

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data Part 2

: p. 225
Disaster and Big Data Part 2
Shunichi Koshimura

6 years have passed since the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. Many new findings, insights and suggestions have been made and were implemented in disaster observation, sensing, simulation, and damage determination. The challenges for disaster mitigation against future catastrophic natural disasters, such as the Tokyo metropolitan earthquake and Nankai Trough earthquake, are how we share the visions of the possible impacts and prepare for mitigating the losses and damages, and how we enhance society’s disaster resilience. A huge amount of information called “disaster big data” obtained, which are related to the dynamic flow of a large number of people, vehicles and goods inside and outside the affected areas. This has dramatically facilitated our understanding of how our society has responded to the unprecedented catastrophes. The key question is how we use big data in establishing the social systems that respond promptly, sensibly and effectively to natural disasters, and in withstanding the adversities with resilience. Researchers with various expertise are working together under the collaborative project called JST CREST “Establishing the most advanced disaster reduction management system by fusion of real-time disaster simulation and big data assimilation.” The project aims to identify possible disaster scenarios caused by earthquake and tsunami that occur and progress in a chained or compound manner and to create new technologies to lead responses and disaster mitigation measures that encourages the society to get over the disaster. This special issue titled “Disaster and Big Data Part 2,” including 13 papers, aims to share the recent progress of the project as the sequel of Part 1 published in March 2016. As an editor of this issue, I would like to express our deep gratitude for the insightful comments and suggestions made by the reviewers and the members of the editorial committee.

: pp. 226-232
Fusion of Real-Time Disaster Simulation and Big Data Assimilation – Recent Progress
Abstract
Please log in.
Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 233-240
Seismic Hazard Visualization from Big Simulation Data: Cluster Analysis of Long-Period Ground-Motion Simulation Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Maeda and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 241-250
Extraction of Collapsed Buildings in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake Using Multi-Temporal PALSAR-2 Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Wen Liu and Fumio Yamazaki
: pp. 251-258
Verification of a Method for Estimating Building Damage in Extensive Tsunami Affected Areas Using L-Band SAR Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideomi Gokon, Shunichi Koshimura, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 259-271
Object-Based Building Damage Assessment Methodology Using Only Post Event ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Dual Polarimetric SAR Intensity Images
Abstract
Please log in.
Yanbing Bai, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, Hideomi Gokon, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 272-286
Investigation of Traffic and Evacuation Aspects at Kumamoto Earthquake and the Future Issues
Abstract
Please log in.
Yosuke Kawasaki, Masao Kuwahara, Yusuke Hara, Takuma Mitani, Atsushi Takenouchi, Takamasa Iryo, and Junji Urata
: pp. 287-295
Predicting Delay of Commuting Activities Following Frequently Occurring Disasters Using Location Data from Smartphones
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Yabe, Yoshihide Sekimoto, Akihito Sudo, and Kota Tsubouchi
: pp. 296-310
Wide-Area Evacuation Simulation Incorporating Rescue and Firefighting by Local Residents
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshihiro Osaragi and Takuya Oki
: pp. 311-319
Simulation Analysis of Fire Brigade Action Strategies During Multiple Simultaneous Fires
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshihiro Osaragi and Noriaki Hirokawa
: pp. 320-328
Early Fire Alert System During an Evacuation with Mobile Sensing Technology
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideki Mori, Masaki Ito, and Kaoru Sezaki
: pp. 329-334
Text-Data Reduction Method to Grasp the Sequence of a Disaster Situation: Case Study of Web News Analysis of the 2015 Typhoons 17 and 18
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato, Toru Okamoto, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 335-346
Online Information as Real-Time Big Data About Heavy Rain Disasters and its Limitations: Case Study of Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, During Typhoons 17 and 18 in 2015
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato, Shuichi Kure, Shuji Moriguchi, Keiko Udo, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 347-354
Difference Operators in Simulation Data Warehouses
Abstract
Please log in.
Jing Zhao, Yoshiharu Ishikawa, Yukiko Wakita, and Kento Sugiura

Regular Papers

: pp. 355-367
Global Water-Related Risk Indicators: Meta-Analysis of Indicator Requirements
Abstract
Please log in.
Karina Vink, Md. Nasif Ahsan, Hisaya Sawano, and Miho Ohara
: pp. 368-377
Basic Study on Appropriate Ways to Hold Reserves to Continue Domestic Life After Large-Scale Earthquakes
Abstract
Please log in.
Kimiro Meguro

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on “Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters Part 2

Special Issue on “Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters Part 2

: p. 5
“Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters Part 2
Haruo Hayashi, Kimiro Meguro, and Keiko Tamura

Based on the lessons from the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology has launched “Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters (2012–2016)” with the aim of reducing the damages caused by the urban earthquake disasters such as the projected earthquake that directly hits Tokyo area and the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes as much as possible. This project is divided into the following three subprojects: namely, 1) “Research and Study on Evaluation of Risk and Hazard of Earthquake that Directly Hits Tokyo Area” represented by Professor Naoshi Hirata, Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo; 2) “Research and Study on Maintenance and Recovery of Functionality in Urban Infrastructures” represented by Professor Masayoshi Nakashima, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University; and 3) “Research and Study on Measures to Improve Urban Resilience to Earthquake Disaster” represented by Dr. Haruo Hayashi, President of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience. This special issue focuses on the findings of the subproject 3). The subproject 3) aims to develop the information communication system for supporting efficient management of emergency responses and restoration efforts and promotion of the capabilities for solution of the problems in terms of disaster, i.e. disaster management literacy, to contribute to high resilience to disaster in our society.

: pp. 6-16
Developing a Web-Based Supporting Application for Individual Evacuation Plans Through Hazard Risk and Geographical Analyses
Abstract
Please log in.
Munenari Inoguchi, Takahiro Sekikawa, and Keiko Tamura
: pp. 17-41
Proposing A Multi-Hazard Approach to Disaster Management Education to Enhance Children’s “Zest for Life”: Development of Disaster Management Education Programs to Be Practiced by Teachers
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshimitsu Nagata and Reo Kimura
: pp. 42-56
Development of a “Disaster Management Literacy Hub” for Collecting, Creating, and Transmitting Disaster Management Content to Increase Disaster Management Literacy
Abstract
Please log in.
Reo Kimura, Haruo Hayashi, Kosuke Kobayashi, Takahiro Nishino, Kenshin Urabe, and Satoshi Inoue
: pp. 57-66
Efficiency Evaluation of Standard Operating Procedures in a Disaster Information System
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yuji Maeda, Fumiaki Ichinose, Masahiro Sugiyama, Tomomi Yamamoto, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 67-78
Disaster Information System Using Natural Language Processing
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoko Kosaka, Akira Koyama, Tomohiro Kokogawa, Yuji Maeda, Hiroko Koumoto, Shingo Suzuki, Kenshi Yamaguchi, and Kentaro Inui
: pp. 79-89
Damage Assessment of Road Bridges Subjected to the 2011 Tohoku Pacific Earthquake Tsunami
Abstract
Please log in.
Gaku Shoji and Tomoharu Nakamura
: pp. 90-105
Verification of Information Sharing System on Shelter, COCOA, at Comprehensive Disaster Drill in Ishinomaki City
Abstract
Please log in.
Muneyoshi Numada, Satoshi Takatsu, Yasuhide Yamauchi, Kimiro Meguro, and Tetsuo Ito
: pp. 106-117
Exposure of Population and Energy-Related Base Facilities to Shaking Intensity Predicted for Nankai Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
Please log in.
Nobuoto Nojima and Hiroki Kato
: pp. 118-130
Development of the Wide-Area Earthquake Damage Estimation System and Mashup of Disaster Prevention Information
Abstract
Please log in.
Masafumi Hosokawa, Ken-ichi Takanashi, Shoji Doshida, Makoto Endo, and Byeong-pyo Jeong
: pp. 131-136
Development of Tsunami Fragility Functions for Ground-Level Roads
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshihisa Maruyama and Osamu Itagaki
: pp. 137-146
People Who Cannot Move During a Disaster – Initiatives and Examples in Japan Disaster Victim Support
Abstract
Please log in.
Eiichi Yamasaki and Haruo Hayashi

Regular Papers

: pp. 147-157
The Impact of the Thai Flood of 2011 on the Rural Poor Population Living on the Flood Plain
Abstract
Please log in.
Yukiko Tahira and Akiyuki Kawasaki
: pp. 158-162
A Primary Assessment of Society-Based Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Kabul City, Afghanistan
Abstract
Please log in.
Mohammad Kazem Naseri and Dongshik Kang
: pp. 163-175
Analysis of Pressure and Acceleration Signals from the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Observed by the DONET Seafloor Network
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroyuki Matsumoto, Mikhail A. Nosov, Sergey V. Kolesov, and Yoshiyuki Kaneda
: pp. 176-186
Study on the Characteristics of Rainfall Runoff in the Kinugawa River Basin and the Evacuation Behavior of the Residents at the Time of Kanto and Tohoku Flood Disaster in September, 2015
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshimasa Morooka and Tadashi Yamada
: pp. 187-197
Agrometeorological Disaster Grading in Guangdong Province Based on Data Mining
Abstract
Please log in.
Danni Wang, Shitai Bao, Chunlin Wang, and Chongyang Wang
: pp. 198-207
Experimental Study on Dam-Break Hydrodynamic Characteristics Under Different Conditions
Abstract
Please log in.
Hui Liu and Haijiang Liu

Vol.11 (2016)

No.6

(Dec)

Special issue on An Approach to Next-Generation Water Disaster Study – In Commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the Establishment of ICHARM –
Special issue on the International Symposium on River Technologies for Innovations and Social Systems at the WECC2015 and the Special Session on Disaster Risk Management at the 11th I3R2

Special issue on An Approach to Next-Generation Water Disaster Study – In Commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the Establishment of ICHARM –

: p. 1031
An Approach to Next-Generation Water Disaster Study – In Commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the Establishment of ICHARM –
Toshio Koike, Kuniyoshi Takeuchi, and Shinji Egashira

In March 2015, the Third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction adopted the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction with a two-part goal: to prevent new and reduce existing disaster risks through the implementation of integrated and inclusive measures that prevent and reduce hazard exposure and vulnerability to disaster, and to increase preparedness for response and recovery, thus strengthening resilience. The first priority for action was given to ”understanding disaster risk,” including focusing on the collection and use of data, risk assessment, disaster prevention education, and awareness raising. The stance of emphasizing science and technology was clearly expressed.

In September 2015, the UN Summit meeting adopted the 17 goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Four of the 17 goals include targets related to disaster prevention and mitigation, which has given rise to active discussions over measurement methods and indicators for the targets. The Paris Conference of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP21), held from the end of November to early December 2015, placed an emphasis on the importance of science and technology in both mitigation and adaptation.

In light of these international discussions and their outcomes, we called for papers on the following three topics for this special edition featuring water disasters.

  • (1) Prevention of new water disaster risks: rainfall prediction, flood and drought prediction, river bed change prediction, climate change, land use plans, etc.
  • (2) Reduction of existing water disaster risks: disaster data and statistics, risk monitoring, risk assessment, etc.
  • (3) Resilience reinforcement and inclusive measures: disaster recovery, risk communication, competence development, etc.

Nineteen papers were applied to this special issue. All papers were peer reviewed, and sixteen papers are included herein. We received invaluable comments and suggestions for all applications from the points of view of various fields from many experts in Japan and overseas. We would like to express our gratitude for these.

: pp. 1032-1039
Ensemble Flood Forecasting of Typhoons Talas and Roke at Hiyoshi Dam Basin
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomoki Ushiyama, Takahiro Sayama, and Yoichi Iwami
: pp. 1040-1051
Glacier Mass Balance and Catchment-Scale Water Balance in Bolivian Andes
Abstract
Please log in.
Tong Liu, Tsuyoshi Kinouchi, Javier Mendoza, and Yoichi Iwami
: pp. 1052-1061
Implementation of Real-Time Flood Prediction and its Application to Dam Operations by Data Integration Analysis System
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshihiro Shibuo, Eiji Ikoma, Oliver Saavedra Valeriano, Lei Wang, Peter Lawford, Masaru Kitsuregawa, and Toshio Koike
: pp. 1062-1072
Inundation Process in the Lower Mekong River Basin
Abstract
Please log in.
Shun Kudo, Atsuhiro Yorozuya, Hiroshi Koseki, Yoichi Iwami, and Makoto Nakatsugawa
: pp. 1073-1081
Numerical Model for Bank Erosion in the Brahmaputra River
Abstract
Please log in.
Robin K. Biswas, Atsuhiro Yorozuya, and Shinji Egashira
: pp. 1082-1090
Meteorological Drought and Flood Assessment Using the Comparative SPI Approach in Asia Under Climate Change
Abstract
Please log in.
Akira Hasegawa, Maksym Gusyev, and Yoichi Iwami
: pp. 1091-1102
Evaluation of Water Cycle Components with Standardized Indices Under Climate Change in the Pampanga, Solo and Chao Phraya Basins
Abstract
Please log in.
Maksym Gusyev, Akira Hasegawa, Jun Magome, Patricia Sanchez, Ai Sugiura, Hitoshi Umino, Hisaya Sawano, and Yoshio Tokunaga
: pp. 1103-1111
Method to Develop Critical Rainfall Conditions for Occurrences of Sediment-Induced Disasters and to Identify Areas Prone to Landslides
Abstract
Please log in.
Yusuke Yamazaki, Shinji Egashira, and Yoichi Iwami
: pp. 1112-1127
The 2015 Flood Impact due to the Overflow and Dike Breach of Kinu River in Joso City, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoko Nagumo, Miho Ohara, Daisuke Kuribayashi, and Hisaya Sawano
: pp. 1128-1136
Rapid Global Exposure Assessment for Extreme River Flood Risk Under Climate Change
Abstract
Please log in.
Youngjoo Kwak and Yoichi Iwami
: pp. 1137-1149
Improvement in Flood Disaster Damage Assessment Using Highly Accurate IfSAR DEM
Abstract
Please log in.
Badri Bhakta Shrestha, Hisaya Sawano, Miho Ohara, and Naoko Nagumo
: pp. 1150-1160
Flood Risk Assessment in Asian Flood Prone Area with Limited Local Data – Case Study in Pampanga River Basin, Philippines –
Abstract
Please log in.
Miho Ohara, Naoko Nagumo, Badri Bhakta Shrestha, and Hisaya Sawano
: pp. 1161-1175
Utilization of the Flood Simulation Model for Disaster Management of Local Government
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Kuribayashi, Miho Ohara, Takahiro Sayama, Atsuhiko Konja, and Hisaya Sawano
: pp. 1176-1189
Enhancement of Flood Countermeasures of Japanese-Affiliated Firms Based on the Lessons Learned from the 2011 Thai Flood
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoko Hagiwara, Daisuke Kuribayashi, and Hisaya Sawano
: pp. 1190-1201
Recovery from Catastrophe and Building Back Better
Abstract
Please log in.
Kuniyoshi Takeuchi and Shigenobu Tanaka
: pp. 1202-1210
International Efforts Toward Robustness of Flood Management
Abstract
Please log in.
Masahiko Murase

Special issue on the International Symposium on River Technologies for Innovations and Social Systems at the WECC2015 and the Special Session on Disaster Risk Management at the 11th I3R2

: p. 1211
the International Symposium on River Technologies for Innovations and Social Systems at the WECC2015 and the Special Session on Disaster Risk Management at the 11th I3R2
Kenichi Tsukahara and Toshimitsu Komatsu

The Standing Technical Committees on Disaster Risk Management (CDRM) of the World Federation of Engineering Organizations (WFEO) play an important role in collecting and disseminating DRM-related information and knowledge that will conceivably help engineering society members take effective disaster mitigation measures. As part of achieving this mission, the CDRM conducted two important 2015 events – the WFEO-CDRM Special Session on Disaster Risk Management at the 11th International Conference of the International Institute for Infrastructure Resilience and Reconstruction (I3R2) (I3R2 session) held in Seoul, Korea, and the 9th Joint International Symposium on Disaster Risk Management conducted in conjunction with the International Symposium on River Technologies for Innovations and Social Systems held in the 2015 World Engineering Conference and Convention (WECC2015) in Kyoto, Japan (WECC2015 symposium).

The I3R2 session featured seven presentations. During the first half, disaster-cause papers covered high typhoon tides, earthquakes, and rain-induced soil erosion. The second half focused on mitigation-measure presentations such as recovery/reconstruction and regional support for mothers and children in the event of disasters.

The WECC2015 symposium featured ten presentations by ten speakers with widely varied backgrounds in disaster mitigation, river engineering, international cooperation, UNESCO regional centers, NPO management, science and technology sections at embassies, and ferry and resort complex management. These informative, meaningful presentations close with active and informative Q&A sessions.

In this special issue, five presentations that were revised as a form of academic paper were selected and published. I hope that these papers will be utilized for further advancement of disaster mitigation measures.

: pp. 1212-1220
Innovation for Resilient Coastal Structures to Reduce Tsunami Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Masahiko Isobe
: pp. 1221-1227
Numerical Simulations of Storm-Surge Inundation Along Innermost Coast of Ariake Sea Based on Past Violent Typhoons
Abstract
Please log in.
Noriaki Hashimoto, Masaki Yokota, Masaru Yamashiro, Yukihiro Kinashi, Yoshihiko Ide, and Mitsuyoshi Kodama
: pp. 1228-1237
Mitigating Rainfall-Induced Sediment Hazard and Soil Erosion Using Organic Amended Soil Improvement
Abstract
Please log in.
Khonesavanh Vilayvong, Noriyuki Yasufuku, and Kiyoshi Omine
: pp. 1238-1243
Using Data and Statistics to Explain Investment Effectiveness on Flood Protection
Abstract
Please log in.
Kenichi Tsukahara and Noriyasu Kachi
: pp. 1244-1251
Financial Feasibility of Neighborhood-Level Relocation from Landslide Danger Zone
Abstract
Please log in.
Noriyasu Kachi and Kenichi Tsukahara

Regular Papers

: pp. 1253-1270
Empirical Fragility Curves of Buildings in Northern Miyagi Prefecture During the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Hao Wu, Kazuaki Masaki, Kojiro Irikura, and Susumu Kurahashi
: pp. 1271-1279
Seismic Responses of Zoned Earth-Fill Dam by Instrumentation and Finite Element Simulation
Abstract
Please log in.
Sirikanya Laosuwan and Tawatchai Tanchaisawat

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on the Worst Disaster Damage Scenarios Resulting National Crisis and Reduction
Special Issue on the 8th South China Sea Tsunami Workshop (SCSTW-8)

Special Issue on the Worst Disaster Damage Scenarios Resulting National Crisis and Reduction

: p. 815
the Worst Disaster Damage Scenarios Resulting National Crisis and Reduction
Yoshiaki Kawata

The 2011 Great East Japan earthquake has shown all too clearly that disaster management and mitigation measures seen from the viewpoint of protecting society are not sufficient for addressing a national crisis such as the projected Nankai Trough earthquake or Tokyo inland earthquake whose damage is expected to exceed the present estimated damage. Our study explores the weakness against disasters in how modern Japanese society uses “reverse thinking” in which investigates studying how large-scale disasters may adversely affect society and increase damage effectively. This process profiles the worst disaster scenarios that could conceivably lead to a national crisis. Classifying these worst scenarios, we suggest policies to the problems that are common to many scenarios, and we present action plans for individual problems.
First, we conduct workshops for identifying damage magnification factors and evaluating their importance under the categories of human damage, property damage, and damage to social functions, unifying the awareness of research organization.
Second, we have researchers on 1) mortality, 2) tsunami inundation, 3) liquefaction, 4) capital function, 5) evacuation, 6) required assistance, 7) lifelines, 8) high buildings, 9) information networks, 10) government systems, and 11) economic systems analyze damage magnification conditions due to hazard, vulnerability and measure aspects.
Third, we sort potential final consequences and separate them based on commonality, and propose new policies and concrete action plans for preventing the occurrence of worst-case scenarios. This research is expected to give new paradigms in disaster management science and new ways of policy making and action planning that will minimize the undesirable consequences of catastrophic earthquake and tsunami and yield new knowledge on disaster processes and damage magnification scenarios.
Most importantly, we conclude that it is necessary to have a new Japanese governmental organization, such as a Ministry of Disaster Resilience or a Disaster Resilience Management Agency, handle these national crises.

: pp. 816-829
An Attempt at Quantifying Disaster Damage Based on the Use of Collective Intelligence
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshiaki Kawata
: pp. 830-844
Liquefaction Analyses of Reclaimed Ground and Levee Considering the Damage by the 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquake and Lessons
Abstract
Please log in.
Fusao Oka, Sayuri Kimoto, Hirokazu Yui, Hiroshi Matsuoka, and Peter Song Yeu Tsai
: pp. 845-856
The School Education to Improve the Disaster Response Capacity : A Case of “Kamaishi Miracle”
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshitaka Katada and Masanobu Kanai
: pp. 857-869
Dynamic Response of Tall Buildings on Sedimentary Basin to Long-Period Seismic Ground Motion
Abstract
Please log in.
Nobuo Fukuwa, Takashi Hirai, Jun Tobita, and Kazumi Kurata
: pp. 870-880
Proposal of Elements for Creating Scenarios for Those Needing Support During National Disasters
Abstract
Please log in.
Keiko Tamura and Munenari Inoguchi
: pp. 881-888
An Attempt of Extracting and Sharing Lessons Learned from Experiences of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Based on the Viewpoints of Experts on Disaster Science: The “Database of Lessons from March 11, 2011”
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 889-896
How will we Manage Recovery from a Catastrophic Disaster? Organization Structure for Recovery Management in the World
Abstract
Please log in.
Norio Maki and Laurie A. Johnson
: pp. 897-910
Building a GIS-Based Information System with Seamless Interaction Between Operations and Disaster Management – New Challenges of Kitakyushu, Fukuoka in Using Spatial Information newline for Regional Disaster Resilient Societies
Abstract
Please log in.
Go Urakawa
: pp. 911-925
National Crisis and Resilience Planning – How to Measure Huge and Compound Disaster that Causes National Crisis –
Abstract
Please log in.
Itsuki Nakabayashi
: pp. 926-934
Targeting Vulnerable People with a Social Safety Net: Lessons from the CFW Program for the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster
Abstract
Please log in.
Shingo Nagamatsu
: pp. 935-946
Impact Analysis of Various Earthquake Scenarios Using a Simplified Web Application for Earthquake Damage Estimation
Abstract
Please log in.
Shingo Suzuki

Special Issue on the 8th South China Sea Tsunami Workshop (SCSTW-8)

: p. 947
the 8th South China Sea Tsunami Workshop (SCSTW-8)
Haijiang Liu

The South China Sea Tsunami Workshop (SCSTW), initiated in 2007 by internationally recognized tsunami expert Prof. Philip L.-F. Liu at Cornell University, has been conducted eight times in the Asia-Pacific region. The SCSTW’s objective is to set up an international academic platform through which strong interactions and collaborations can be established among coastal physical oceanographers, geophysicists and engineers from the South China Sea region can meet and address tsunami generation mechanisms, propagation characteristics and the corresponding coastal effects. This workshop supports approaches to tsunami disaster protection and hazard mitigation. The 8th South China Sea Tsunami Workshop (SCSTW-8), held in Changsha, China, from Nov. 9 to 13, 2015, was hosted by the Changsha University of Science and Technology.
Typhoon-induced storm surges and significant waves are predominant coastal disaster features of China’s east coast. One example is the latest Typhoon Meranti in Sept. 2016, which significantly damaged the infrastructure and resulted in the loss of dozens of lives in China’s coastal regions, especially in Fujian province. The study of typhoon-induced storm surges is thus highly important in coastal disaster prevention and mitigation.
This special issue consists of 7 papers focusing on the recent research progress in tsunami and storm surge presented in the SCSTW-8. Results are analyzed and discussed using different research approaches, including laboratory experiments, analytical analysis, data assessment and numerical simulation. As the editor of this special issue, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the authors for their invaluable contributions and to the reviewers for their insightful comments and suggestions. Special thanks go to Dr. Yu Yao of the Changsha University of Science and Technology for his generous assistance in preparing this special issue. I hope readers will find the papers in this special collection both interesting and useful.

: pp. 948-956
A Semi-Analytical Model on Wave-Induced Setup over Fringing Reefs with a Shallow Reef Crest
Abstract
Please log in.
Yu Yao, Zhengjiang Tang, Ruichao Du, and Changbo Jiang
: pp. 957-963
Non-Hydrostatic Model for Solitary Waves Passing Through a Porous Structure
Abstract
Please log in.
Ikha Magdalena
: pp. 964-972
Wave Effects on the Storm Surge Simulation: A Case Study of Typhoon Khanun
Abstract
Please log in.
Fuchun Lai, Luying Liu, and Haijiang Liu
: pp. 973-981
An Experimental Study of Beach Evolution with an Artificial Seepage
Abstract
Please log in.
Changbo Jiang, Yizhuang Liu, Bin Deng, Yu Yao, and Qiong Huang
: pp. 982-988
Experimental Study on the Fluid Mud Transportation Under Currents with Fluctuating Water Surface
Abstract
Please log in.
Chunrong Liu, Wenyu Yang, Bo Wu, and Huhe Aode
: pp. 989-994
Experimental Study on 3D Scour Around an Embedded Submarine Pipeline Under Oblique Waves
Abstract
Please log in.
Dianqi Li, Yongzhou Cheng, Yu Yao, Xunxiao Li, and Xianhe Lu
: pp. 995-1002
Long-Term Geomorphic Changes in the Coastal Profile of Lingding Bay in the Pearl River Estuary and the Response to Tides Since 1906
Abstract
Please log in.
Qing Zhou, Qinghua Gong, Zhongyu Sun, and Xulong Liu

Regular Papers

: pp. 1003-1016
Accuracy of Quantitative Precipitation Estimation Using Operational Weather Radars: A Case Study of Heavy Rainfall on 9–10 September 2015 in the East Kanto Region, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Shakti P. C., Ryohei Misumi, Tsuyoshi Nakatani, Koyuru Iwanami, Masayuki Maki, Takeshi Maesaka, and Kohin Hirano

No.sp

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part V

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part V

: p. 769
the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part V
Katsuki Takiguchi

Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) published its first issue in August, 2006. Since then, we have published six issues a year on a bimonthly basis. JDR is an academic journal aimed at bringing a broad, comprehensive discussion to the subject of disasters, and thus contributing to the field of disaster prevention and reduction.
Its comprehensive coverage harbors the risk of becoming unfocussed or fostering unsubstantiated conclusions. At JDR, we have dealt with this risk by making most issues special feature issues, and inviting specialists in the relevant fields as guest editors.
The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March, 2011, five years after our first issue was published. It was a Mw9.0 earthquake that occurred off the Pacific coast of the Tohoku region. The earthquake triggered a tsunami which produced huge casualties, amounting to over 18,000 dead or missing persons. The disaster was accompanied by a nuclear plant accident, an unprecedented event in mankind’s history. The catastrophic accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, operated by Tokyo Electric Company, resulted in core meltdown and the release of radioactive material.
At JDR, we considered it our responsibility to publish, apart from our regular issues, special issues on the Great East Japan Earthquake consisting of five yearly issues beginning with the first issue in 2012. This issue, Part 5, is the final issue. We would like to thank all of the authors who submitted articles for the five special issues, the reviewers, and many others who contributed. The special issues project on the Great East Japan Earthquake will be passed down to a special issue on the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes occurred on April, 2016 in Kumamoto, Japan.

Co-Editors:
Suminao Murakami (Editor-in-Chief; Representative, Laboratory of Urban Safety Planning, Japan)
Haruo Hayashi (Editor-in-Chief; President, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Japan)
Hideaki Karaki (President, Foundation of Food Safety and Security, Japan)

: pp. 770-779
A Philosophical Inquiry into the Confusion over the Radiation Exposure Problem
Abstract
Please log in.
Masaki Ichinose
: pp. 780-788
Building Reconstruction After Large-Scale Disasters A Case Study of Ishinomaki City After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Michio Ubaura, Junpei Nieda, and Masashi Miyakawa
: pp. 789-797
Risk Perceptions of Resuming Nuclear Power Plant Operations After Fukushima: A Student Survey
Abstract
Please log in.
Kami Seo, Tadahiro Motoyoshi, and Yasunobu Maeda
: pp. 798-810
Performance of Countermeasures Against Massive Slope Failures in Sendai City During the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Nozomu Yoshida and Kazue Wakamatsu

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Uncertainties in Tsunami Effects

Special Issue on Uncertainties in Tsunami Effects

: pp. 613-614
Uncertainties in Tsunami Effects
Harry Yeh and Shinji Sato

The 2011 Heisei tsunami far exceeded the level previously anticipated, resulting in devastating impacts in Japan. This event made it clear that preparation for tsunami hazards, based on past historical data alone, is inadequate. It is because tsunami hazards are characterized by a lack of historical data – due to the fact tsunamis are rare, high impact phenomena. Hence, it is important to populate a dataset with more data by including events that might have occurred outside the recorded historical timeframe, such as those inferred from geologic evidence. The dataset can also be expanded with “imaginary” experiments performed numerically using proper models. Unlike historical data that directly represent actual tsunami events as fact, geologic evidence (for example, sediment deposits) remains a conjecture for tsunami occurrences, and tsunami runup conditions evaluated using geologic data are uncertain. Theoretical approaches require making hypotheses, assumptions, and approximations. Numerical simulations require not only the accurate initial and boundary conditions but also adequate modeling techniques and computational capacity. Therefore, it is crucial to quantify the uncertainties involved in geologic, theoretical, and modeling approaches.

Approximately 30 years ago, research on paleo-tsunamis based on geologic evidence was initiated and has been significantly advanced in the intervening years. During the same period, substantial advances in computational modeling used to predict tsunami propagation and runup processes were made. Understanding tsunami behavior, characteristics, and physics have resulted primarily from the well-organized international effort of field surveys initiated by the 1992 Nicaragua Tsunami event. Such rapidly advancing knowledge and technologies were unfortunately not sufficiently implemented in practice in a timely manner. Had this been the case, the disaster of the 2011 event would have been reduced, possibly avoiding the infamous nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant.

Having learned lessons from the 2011 Heisei Tsunami, Japan is now attempting to develop a robust tsunami-mitigation strategy that consists of two-tier criteria: Level 1 Tsunami for structure-based tsunami protection and Level 2 Tsunami for evacuation-based disaster reduction. Tsunami intensities of Levels 1 and 2 are determined by experts’ analysis and judgments. In the United States, a probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis is now widely adopted: for example, the latest ASCE-7 inundation maps are based on the hazard level of a 2,500-year return period. But again, due to the lack of data, the probabilistic analysis must rely mainly on imaginary experiments and experts’ judgments.

The topic of this special issue focuses on the theme of uncertainty involved in tsunami hazard prediction. We review and examine uncertainties associated with tsunami simulations, near-shore effects, flow velocities, tsunami effects on buildings, coastal infrastructure, and sediment transport and deposits. Substantial uncertainty regarding tsunami hazards is likely the result of tsunami generation processes. This component, however, is not discussed here because it is closely related to the topic of probabilistic ‘seismic’ hazard analysis.

This special issue is a compilation of seven papers addressing the current status of predictabilities, and will hopefully stimulate continual research that will lead to further improvements.
(more…)

: pp. 615-623
Precise Prediction of Coastal and Overland Flow Dynamics: A Grand Challenge or a Fool’s Errand
Abstract
Please log in.
Patrick J. Lynett
: pp. 624-633
Performance-Based Tsunami Engineering via a Web-Based GIS Data Explorer
Abstract
Please log in.
Dylan Keon, Cherri M. Pancake, Ben Steinberg, and Harry Yeh
: pp. 634-638
Development of a New Tsunami Generator for Multiple Sources
Abstract
Please log in.
Tetsuya Hiraishi
: pp. 639-646
Development of High Precision Tsunami Runup Calculation Method Based on a Hierarchical Simulation
Abstract
Please log in.
Taro Arikawa and Takashi Tomita
: pp. 647-661
Uncertainty in Tsunami Sediment Transport Modeling
Abstract
Please log in.
Bruce Jaffe, Kazuhisa Goto, Daisuke Sugawara, Guy Gelfenbaum, and SeanPaul La Selle
: pp. 662-669
Tsunami Effects on Buildings and Coastal Structures
Abstract
Please log in.
Harry Yeh and Shinji Sato
: pp. 670-679
Influence of Openings and Orientation on Tsunami Generated Forces on Buildings
Abstract
Please log in.
Chathura Manawasekara, Norimi Mizutani, and Satoru Aoki

Regular Papers

: pp. 691-698
Modifying Business Continuity Plan (BCP) Towards an Effective Auto-Mobile Business Continuity Management (BCM): A Quantitative Approach
Abstract
Please log in.
Abednico Lopang Montshiwa, Akio Nagahira, and Shuichi Ishida
: pp. 707-719
Science Communication of Hazards with Scientific Uncertainty: In the Cases of Volcanic Activity
Abstract
Please log in.
Miwa Kuri
: pp. 720-731
Spatial-Temporal Assessment of Debris Flow Risk in the Ms8.0 Wenchuan Earthquake-Disturbed Area
Abstract
Please log in.
Xin Yao and Lingjing Li
: pp. 732-741
A Case Study on the Health Risks Related to Flood Disasters in South Africa
Abstract
Please log in.
Roman Tandlich, Mbonisi Ncube, S. M. M. Khamanga, and Bongumusa M. Zuma
: pp. 742-753
A Systematic Review of the Factors Affecting the Cyclone Evacuation Decision Process in Bangladesh
Abstract
Please log in.
Md. Nasif Ahsan, Kuniyoshi Takeuchi, Karina Vink, and Miho Ohara

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on the Third United Nations World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) – Public Forum

Special Issue on the Third United Nations World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) – Public Forum

: pp. 385-386
the Third United Nations World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) – Public Forum
Yasuhito Jibiki, Yuichi Ono, Fumihiko Imamura

  Participants in the Third United Nations World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) in Sendai, Japan, March 14–18, 2015, discussed the successor framework of the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) adopted at the 2005 Second World Conference on Disaster Reduction. These two frameworks were based on the Yokohama Strategy for a Safer World adopted at the First World Conference on Natural Disaster Reduction.
  According to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, 187 United Nations member states attended the WCDRR, together with over 6,500 participants and over 100 minister-level officials, including the heads of state of seven countries, prime ministers of five countries (including Japan), vice-presidential officials from six countries, and deputy prime ministers from seven countries. Related events included 150,000 attendees from Japan and abroad.
  The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 (SFDRR) and the Sendai Declaration were adopted by consensus as the outcome documents.   One feature of the WCDRR was the large number of citizens taking part. These included governments, international organizations, NGOs, private-sectors groups and universities. They took part in 398 symposiums and seminars, plus over 200 exhibitions and other events.
  WCDRR discussions continued even after the conference, activating the Miyagi Roundtable for Disaster Risk Reduction, whose collaborators were from industry, government, academia, regular citizens, and the media. The Sendai Future Forum on Disaster Risk Reduction was held in March 2016, one year later. Information sharing and discussions on disaster risk reduction and reconstruction are now in progress.   The most remarkable aspect of the SFDRR as a WCDRR outcome document is the identification of seven global targets on disaster risk reduction. These targets were not included in either the Yokohama Strategy or the HFA. Two reasons why the target setting is significant are as follows:
(more…)

: pp. 387-393
Bridging Multi-Stakeholders for Disaster Risk Reduction Through Education for Sustainable Development into the Post-2015 Framework
Abstract
Please log in.
Takashi Oda
: pp. 394-401
Review of Recent Water-Related Disasters and Scientific Activities in Southeast Asia: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Please log in.
Shuichi Kure, Taichi Tebakari, and Mamoru Miyamoto
: pp. 402-412
Promoting Education for Disaster Resilience and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Please log in.
Aiko Sakurai and Takeshi Sato
: pp. 413-420
Collaborative, Science-Based, Public Disaster Communication – The NHK Media Technology 3D Documentary Movie on Japan’s 2011 Tsunami Event
Abstract
Please log in.
Natsuko Chubachi, Michihiro Chikata, Kiyoshi Ito, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 421-424
Preliminary Analysis on Science for Global Safety with Reference to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasuhito Jibiki
: pp. 425-436
Report of “Geopark on Stricken Areas: Disasters and Gifts of Geo”
Abstract
Please log in.
Miwa Kuri, Ikuko Miyahara, Shosuke Sato, Mahito Watanabe, and Kazuyuki Nakagawa
: pp. 437-442
Archiving and Memorializing Disasters Report of a UN International Workshop
Abstract
Please log in.
Sébastien Penmellen Boret and Akihiro Shibayama
: pp. 443-453
Developments of Tools to Survive the Disasters – Civil Empowerment of “Zest for Living in Disaster” –
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato, Fumihiko Imamura, Mari Yasuda, Motoaki Sugiura, and Rui Nouchi
: pp. 454-458
Science and Practical Disaster Risk Reduction: Role of Universities and Academia in Disaster Risk Reduction – From the Discussions at the UNWCDRR Public Forum by APRU and IRIDeS –
Abstract
Please log in.
Takako Izumi
: pp. 459-469
Quantitative Text Analysis of Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030
Abstract
Please log in.
Osamu Murao and Hiroko Sakaba
: pp. 470-475
Strengthening Governance on Disaster Risk Reduction Through Improved Disaster Damage Statistics
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuya Ito, Masaaki Miyamoto, and Yuichi Ono
: pp. 476-485
Practical Efforts for Post-Disaster Reconstruction in the City of Ishinomaki, Miyagi
Abstract
Please log in.
Teppei Kobayashi, Yasuaki Onoda, Katsuya Hirano, and Michio Ubaura
: pp. 486-495
Planning Processes for Reconstruction with Citizen Participation After Large-Scale Disasters: A Case Study of Reconstruction Study Meetings in Miyako City After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Michio Ubaura and Sei Akiyama
: pp. 496-503
Public Forum Progress and Future of Business Continuity Management in Japan – Based on the Lessons Learnt After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroaki Maruya
: pp. 504-511
The Importance of Local Oriented Dissemination of Reconstruction: The Design of Tohoku Reconstruction & DRR Pavilion
Abstract
Please log in.
Takumi Iwasawa and Yasuaki Onoda
: pp. 512-516
Roles of People, Community and Planning in Recovery After Mega-Disasters: A Symposium Synopsis
Abstract
Please log in.
Kanako Iuchi and Elizabeth Maly
: pp. 517-534
Perception, Participation, and Effect of Nuclear Emergency Response Drills
Abstract
Please log in.
Michimasa Matsumoto
: pp. 535-543
Building Private Sector Resilience: Directions After the 2015 Sendai Framework
Abstract
Please log in.
Masahiko Haraguchi, Upmanu Lall, and Kenji Watanabe

Regular Papers

: pp. 545-551
Identification of Minimum Standards in Emergency Goods for Earthquake Relief in Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Rienna Oktarina, Senator Nur Bahagia, Lucia Diawati, and Krishna S. Pribadi
: pp. 552-558
Exploring Community Attitudes Towards Sharing of Bushfire Information Online
Abstract
Please log in.
Paul Haimes, Stuart Medley, Danielle Brady, and Tetsuaki Baba
: pp. 559-565
Structural Repair Prioritization of Buildings Damaged After Earthquake Using Fuzzy Logic Model
Abstract
Please log in.
Koraphon Saicheur and Chayanon Hansapinyo
: pp. 566-576
Study on Risk Reduction of Electric Power Supply Restriction by Reinforcement of Interconnection Lines Between Areas for the Nankai Trough Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Tetsuya Torayashiki and Hiroaki Maruya
: pp. 577-592
Multi-Temporal Correlation Method for Damage Assessment of Buildings from High-Resolution SAR Images of the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan
Abstract
Please log in.
Pisut Nakmuenwai, Fumio Yamazaki, and Wen Liu
: pp. 593-598
Development and Performance of a Battery-Free Disaster Prevention Radio “HOOPRA” Using the Energy Harvested from Radio Waves
Abstract
Please log in.
Eiichi Shoji

No.2

(Mar)

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data
Special Issue on Comprehensive Disaster Prevention Measures for Underground Spaces

Special Issue on Disaster and Big Data

: p. 163
Disaster and Big Data
Shunichi Koshimura

In the years that have passed since the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake, many new findings, insights and suggestions have been made in disaster observation, sensing, simulation, and damage determination on the damage scene. Based on the lessons, challenges for disaster mitigation against future catastrophic natural disasters such as the anticipated Tokyo metropolitan and Nankai Trough earthquakes are made on how we will share visions of potential impact and how we will maximize society’s disaster resilience. Much of the “disaster big data” obtained is related to the dynamic flow of large populations, vehicles and goods inside and outside affected areas. This has dramatically facilitated our understanding of how society has responded to unprecedented catastrophes. The key question is how we will use big data in establishing social systems that respond promptly, sensibly and effectively to natural disasters how this understanding will affect adversity and resilience. Researchers from a wide variety of fields are now working together under the collaborative JST CREST project entitled “Establishing the most advanced disaster reduction management system by fusion of real-time disaster simulation and big data assimilation.” One objective of this project is to identify potential disaster scenarios related to earthquake and tsunami progress in a chained or compound manner and to create new techniques for responsive disaster mitigation measures enabling society to recover. This special issue on disaster and big data consists of 11 papers detailing the recent progress of this project. As an editor of this issue, I would like to express our deep gratitude for the insightful comments and suggestions made by the reviewers and the members of the editorial committee.

: pp. 164-174
Establishing the Advanced Disaster Reduction Management System by Fusion of Real-Time Disaster Simulation and Big Data Assimilation
Abstract
Please log in.
Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 175-187
Earthquake Disaster Simulation System: Integration of Models for Building Collapse, Road Blockage, and Fire Spread
Abstract
Please log in.
Noriaki Hirokawa and Toshihiro Osaragi
: pp. 188-197
Modeling Human Behavior of Local Residents in the Aftermath of a Large Earthquake – Wide-Area Evacuation, Rescue and Firefighting in Densely Built-Up Wooden Residential Areas
Abstract
Please log in.
Takuya Oki and Toshihiro Osaragi
: pp. 198-206
Grasp of Disaster Situation and Support Need Inside Affected Area with Social Sensing – An Analysis of Twitter Data Before and After the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Occurring –
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato, Kazumasa Hanaoka, Makoto Okumura, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 207-216
User Participatory Sensing for Disaster Detection and Mitigation
Abstract
Please log in.
Kaoru Sezaki, Shin'ichi Konomi, and Masaki Ito
: pp. 217-224
Human Mobility Estimation Following Massive Disaster Using Filtering Approach
Abstract
Please log in.
Akihito Sudo, Takehiro Kashiyama, Takahiro Yabe, Hiroshi Kanasugi, and Yoshihide Sekimoto
: pp. 225-235
Object-Based Method for Estimating Tsunami-Induced Damage Using TerraSAR-X Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideomi Gokon, Shunichi Koshimura, and Masashi Matsuoka
: pp. 236-245
Monitoring of the Recovery Process of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from VHR SAR Images
Abstract
Please log in.
Wen Liu, Fumio Yamazaki, and Tadashi Sasagawa
: pp. 246-254
Real-Time Simulation of Dynamic Traffic Flow with Traffic Data Assimilation Approach
Abstract
Please log in.
Yosuke Kawasaki, Yusuke Hara, Takuma Mitani, and Masao Kuwahara
: pp. 255-264
Simulation Data Warehouse for Integration and Analysis of Disaster Information
Abstract
Please log in.
Jing Zhao, Kento Sugiura, Yuanyuan Wang, and Yoshiharu Ishikawa
: pp. 265-271
Seismic Hazard Visualization from Big Simulation Data: Construction of a Parallel Distributed Processing System for Ground Motion Simulation Data
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Maeda and Hiroyuki Fujiwara

Special Issue on Comprehensive Disaster Prevention Measures for Underground Spaces

: p. 273
Comprehensive Disaster Prevention Measures for Underground Spaces (Underground Malls, etc.)
Ichiro Matsuo

Underground spaces have been variously used. Excluding underground floors of individual buildings, underground space in Japan is mainly used for streets, railways, and parking. Stores are often grouped along underground passages to underground railways and parking near main urban terminals. An accidental underground gas explosion at Shizuoka Station in 1980 led to disaster prevention measures in such spaces, forcing stricter safety standards. Following this was the 1999 Hakata underground mall inundation by the Mikawa River, which has further broadened the attention to the underground space and its inundation risk. Inundation damages in underground malls and spaces had occurred repeatedly since then, however, we believe that the 2012 inundation damage to underground spaces in New York city caused by Hurricane Sandy triggered further reviews of disaster prevention measures against underground spaces in Japan. Recently, small inundation damages often occurred in underground malls in Japan. With our praying these would not be prior events for possible large disasters, we publish this special issue considering that publishing disaster prevention measures and researches for underground spaces is increasingly important worldwide. This special issue features inundation damage caused by Hurricane Sandy, Japan’s law systems on antiflood measures in underground spaces, antiflood measures of the subway in Tokyo Metropolitan Area, current situations of antiflood measures in underground spaces. We would like to express our sincere thanks to those who contributed reports and research papers to this issue.

: pp. 274-284
Storm Surge Impact to Subterranean Areas by Hurricane Sandy, and Lessons for Japan’s Storm Surge Countermeasures
Abstract
Please log in.
Joel Challender
: pp. 285-288
Revision of Flood Control Act and Measures for Underground Shopping Complexes
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasuaki Asahori
: pp. 289-297
Natural Disaster Measures on Tokyo Metro
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshiaki Kogure
: pp. 298-305
Vulnerability to Underground Inundation and Evacuation in Densely Urbanized Area
Abstract
Please log in.
Taisuke Ishigaki, Ryuji Kawanaka, Taira Ozaki, and Keiichi Toda
: pp. 306-314
Panic and Crowd Disaster in Underground Space
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoya Sekiya
: pp. 315-321
Study About the Effect of the Signposting for Evacuation in the Underground Space
Abstract
Please log in.
U Hiroi and Jyunya Aoyama
: pp. 322-333
Disaster Reduction Measures Against Inundation in Underground Area and Development of Disaster Prevention Action Plan Using TimeLine
Abstract
Please log in.
Ichiro Matsuo, Takanori Kuribayashi, and Kunishige Kamura
: pp. 334-339
Environmental Sensor Network of NTT DOCOMO
Abstract
Please log in.
Hisakazu Tsuboya, Ken Kumagai, Yasuko Furuta, and Akiko Miyajima

Regular Papers

: pp. 341-353
Proposal for Development Cooperation to Enhance the Capacity on Disaster Emergency Response in Developing Countries : A Case Study of Curriculum Development in the People’s Republic of China
Abstract
Please log in.
Toshiyuki Shimano, Reo Kimura, Haruo Hayashi, Noriaki Nagatomo, and Yukihisa Sakurada
: pp. 354-361
Experimental Study Characterizing Retrofitting Method for Shear Walls at Nuclear Plant
Abstract
Please log in.
Shin-ichi Takezaki, Hideo Ono, Yoko Yasutomi, and Seiya Katayama
: pp. 362-368
Shear Characteristics of Seismic Retrofitting Cylindrical Walls in Nuclear Power Plants
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideyoshi Watanabe, Hideo Ono, Yoko Yasutomi, and Takeshi Okamura

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products

Special Issue on Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products

: p. 3
Integrated Study on Mitigation of Multimodal Disasters Caused by Ejection of Volcanic Products
Masato Iguchi

Volcanic eruptions induce often widely dispersed, multimodal flows such as volcanic ash, pyroclastics, layers, and lava. Lahars triggered by heavy rain may extend far beyond ash deposits. Indonesia, which has 127 volcanoes along its archipelago, is at high risk for such disasters. The 2010 Merapi volcano eruption, for example, generated pyroclastic flows up to 17 km from the summit along the Gendol River, killing over 300 residents. The February 13, 2014, eruption of the Kelud volcano produced a gigantic ash plume over 17 km high, dispersing tehpra widely over Java Island. Ash falls and dispersion closed 7 airports and caused many flights to be cancelled.
Volcanoes in Japan have recently become active, with the 2014 phreatic eruption at the Ontake volcano leaving 63 hikers dead or missing. The eruption of the Kuchinoerabujima volcano on May 29, 2015, forced all island residents to be evacuated.
All of these events undeerscore how underedeveloped Japan’s early warning alert levels remain. The Sakurajima volcano, currently Japan’s most active, maintained high activity in the first half of 2015. Ash from Janaury 2015, for example, was moved down the volcano’s slopes by extremely heavy rain in June and July, accumulating as thick sediment near villages.
Regarding such situations of volcano countries, we will develop an integrated system to mitigate many kinds of disasters which are generated by volcanic eruptions and extended by rain fall and wind, based on scientific knowledge. We are developing an integrated warning system to be used by local and national governments to mitigate volcanic and sediment disasters. We are also creating measure against volcanic ash for airlines.
This special issue summarizes basic scientific knowledge and technology on the present warning system to be used in the integrated system for decision-making.

: pp. 4-14
Method for Real-Time Evaluation of Discharge Rate of Volcanic Ash – Case Study on Intermittent Eruptions at the Sakurajima Volcano, Japan –
Abstract
Please log in.
Masato Iguchi
: pp. 15-30
Preliminary Results of Weather Radar Observations of Sakurajima Volcanic Smoke
Abstract
Please log in.
Masayuki Maki, Masato Iguchi, Takeshi Maesaka, Takahiro Miwa, Toshikazu Tanada, Tomofumi Kozono, Tatsuya Momotani, Akihiko Yamaji, and Ikuya Kakimoto
: pp. 31-42
Numerical Simulations of Volcanic Ash Plume Dispersal from Kelud Volcano in Indonesia on February 13, 2014
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroshi L. Tanaka, Masato Iguchi, and Setsuya Nakada
: pp. 43-52
Mechanism of Volcanic Tephra Falling Detected by X-Band Multi-Parameter Radar
Abstract
Please log in.
Satoru Oishi, Masahiro Iida, Masahide Muranishi, Mariko Ogawa, Ratih Indri Hapsari and Masato Iguchi
: pp. 53-59
Credibility of Volcanic Ash Thicknesses Reported by the Media and Local Residents Following the 2014 Eruption of Kelud Volcano, Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Setsuya Nakada, Akhmad Zaennudin, Fukashi Maeno, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, and Natsumi Hokanishi
: pp. 60-71
Modeling of Information Flow for Early Warning in Mount Merapi Area, Indonesia
Abstract
Please log in.
Leslie Jamie Cobar, Djoko Legono, and Kuniaki Miyamoto
: pp. 72-84
Investigation and Separation of Turbulent Fluctuations in Airborne Measurements of Volcanic Ash with Optical Particle Counters
Abstract
Please log in.
Jonas Elíasson, Konradin Weber, Andreas Vogel Thorgeir Pálsson, Junichi Yoshitani and Daisuke Miki
: pp. 85-95
Measurements of Particle Distribution and Ash Fluxes in the Plume of Sakurajima Volcano with Optical Particle Counter
Abstract
Please log in.
Jonas Elíasson, Junichi Yoshitani, Daisuke Miki, Konradin Weber, Christoph Bölke, and Emad Scharifi

Regular Papers

: pp. 97-105
Shaking Table Test of Quarter Scale 20 Story RC Moment Frame Building Subjected to Long Period Ground Motions
Abstract
Please log in.
Kuniyoshi Sugimoto, Kenji Yonezawa, Hideo Katsumata, and Hiroshi Fukuyama
: pp. 106-117
Proposal for an Efficient Damping System for High-Rise Buildings in Major Earthquakes
Abstract
Please log in.
Katsuhide Murakami, Masato Ishii, Kentaroh Miyazaki, and Yasuhiro Tsuneki
: pp. 118-124
Recent Design Approaches for Passively Controlled Structures
Abstract
Please log in.
Toru Takeuchi
: pp. 125-135
Deformation Capacity of Steel Shear Panel Damper and its Reflection to AIJ Design Requirements
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroyuki Tamai and Kazuhiko Kasai
: pp. 136-146
Empirical Data Analysis and Simulation Modeling for Evacuation Movement with the Presence of Irregular Non-Continuous Exterior Stairs
Abstract
Please log in.
Hugo H. Poveda Gironda, Satoru Sadohara, Satoshi Yoshida, and Keiko Inagaki

Vol.10 (2015)

No.6

(Dec)

The First JDR Award
Mini Special Issue on Space Microbiology: Microbial Monitoring in the International Space Station – “Kibo”

The First JDR Award

: p. 1017
Congratulations! The First JDR Award
Dr. Murakami and Dr. Takiguchi
: p. 1018
Presenting the First JDR Award
Katsuki Takiguchi
: p. 1019
Message from the Winners
Fumio Yamazaki and Carlos Zavala

Mini Special Issue on Space Microbiology: Microbial Monitoring in the International Space Station – “Kibo”

: pp. 1022-1024
Microbes and Crewed Space Habitat
Abstract
Please log in.
Nobuyasu Yamaguchi and Masao Nasu
: pp. 1025-1030
Microbial Observatory Research in the International Space Station and Japanese Experiment Module “Kibo”
Abstract
Please log in.
Masaki Shirakawa, Fumiaki Tanigaki, and Takashi Yamazaki
: pp. 1031-1034
Significance of Changes in the Skin Fungal Microbiomes of Astronauts Staying on the International Space Station
Abstract
Please log in.
Takashi Sugita and Otomi Cho
: pp. 1035-1039
Bacterial Monitoring in the International Space Station – “Kibo”
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomoaki Ichijo, Nobuyasu Yamaguchi, and Masao Nasu

Regular Papers

: pp. 1041-1050
Disaster Warning System in the Philippines Through Enterprise Engineering Perspective: A Study on the 2013 Super Typhoon Haiyan
Abstract
Please log in.
Natt Leelawat, Anawat Suppasri, Shuichi Kure, Carine J. Yi, Cherry May R. Mateo, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1051-1066
Organizational Structure and Institutions for Disaster Prevention: Research on the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in Kobe City
Abstract
Please log in.
Masahiro Matsuyama, Reo Kimura, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 1067-1080
The 1755 Lisbon Tsunami at Vila do Bispo Municipality, Portugal
Abstract
Please log in.
Angela Santos and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 1081-1090
A Distributed Autonomous Approach to Developing a Disaster Evacuation Assist System
Abstract
Yasuki Iizuka, Katsuya Kinoshita, and Kayo Iizuka
: pp. 1091-1098
Impacts of Business Continuity Management (BCM) on Automobile Parts Makers Against Natural Disaster Events
Abstract
Please log in.
Abednico Lopang Montshiwa and Akio Nagahira
: pp. 1099-1109
Flood Inundation Analysis and Mitigation with a Coupled 1D-2D Hydraulic Model: A Case Study in Kochi, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
M. A. C. Niroshinie, Yasuo Nihei, Kazuaki Ohtsuki, and Shoji Okada
: pp. 1110-1116
Pricing Earthquake Catastrophe Options Based on the Mixed-Multinomial Tree Model
Abstract
Please log in.
Feixing Wang and Xiaoling Gu
: pp. 1117-1125
Disaster Education for Elementary School Students Using Disaster Prevention Pocket Notebooks and Quizzes
Abstract
Please log in.
Rui Nouchi, Shosuke Sato, and Fumihiko Imamura

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Creating Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society

Special Issue on Creating Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society

: pp. 791-793
Creating Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society
Takashi Furuya, Haruo Hayashi

The “risk society” has become a key 21st century theme due to the economic expansion and population explosion spurred by science and technology development during the 20th century. We must create societies resilient against risk to preserve well-being and continue sustainable development. Although the ideal would be to create a society free from disaster and crisis, resources are limited. To achieve a more resilient society using these resources, we must become wise enough to identify the risks threatening society and clarify how we are to prepare against them.

The traditional engineering approach is limited by its aim to reduce damage reduction as functional system of hazard, exposure, and vulnerability by focusing on mitigative action. We must instead add two factors – human activity and time dependency after a disaster – to make society more risk-resilient.

The Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX) of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) seeks to create new social, public, and economic value by solving obvious problems in society. In promoting science and technology R&D for society, RISTEX supports the building of networks enabling researchers and stakeholders to cooperate in solving societal problems. Our initiatives use R&D employing knowledge in the field of the humanities and social sciences, combined with natural sciences and technologies. Based on these existing accumulated knowledge and skills, scientifically verifying issues and lessons learned from these disasters, RISTEX launched a new R&D focus area, entitled “Creating a Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society,” in 2012. This R&D focus is to develop disaster risk reduction systems making society robust and resilient in the face of large-scale disasters.
(more…)

: pp. 794-806
Support for Farmland Restoration Through Mutual Assistance After Flood Disasters in Hilly and Mountainous Areas – Cases of the Cities of Yame and Ukiha Affected by the Torrential Rainfall in Northern Kyushu in July 2012 –
Abstract
Please log in.
Kazuo Asahiro, Masakazu Tani, and Hiroyuki Kanekiyo
: pp. 807-817
A Study on Community-Based Reconstruction from Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster – A Case Study of Iwanuma City in Miyagi-Pref.
Abstract
Please log in.
Mikiko Ishikawa
: pp. 818-829
Reconstruction of Coastal Villages Swept Away by Tsunami by 3D Digital Model
Abstract
Please log in.
Akinobu Murakami, Eiko Kumakura, and Mikiko Ishikawa
: pp. 830-844
Computer-Assisted Databasing of Disaster Management Information Through Natural Language Processing
Abstract
Please log in.
Kentaro Inui, Yotaro Watanabe, Kenshi Yamaguchi, Shingo Suzuki, Hiroko Koumoto, Naoko Kosaka, Akira Koyama, Tomohiro Kokogawa, and Yuji Maeda
: pp. 845-856
Study on an Online Communication and Task Management System for Disaster Response Utilizing Natural Language Processing
Abstract
Please log in.
Shingo Suzuki, Kentaro Inui, Kenshi Yamaguchi, Hiroko Koumoto, Naoko Kosaka, Akira Koyama, and Yuji Maeda
: pp. 857-873
Proposal and Practice of Comprehensive Disaster Mitigation Depending on Communities in Preservation Districts for Traditional Buildings
Abstract
Please log in.
Hajime Yokouchi
: pp. 874-886
Challenges for Safe and Secure Community Development in Traditional Architectures Preservation Districts – A Case Study on Tochigi District
Abstract
Please log in.
Saori Kawazoe, Saikaku Toyokawa, Fumiko Imai, and Masaki Urano
: pp. 887-899
A Proposal of Multi-Scale Urban Disaster Mitigation Planning that Takes Regional Issues into Consideration
Abstract
Please log in.
U Hiroi, Akito Murayama, Yoshihiro Chiba, Hisashi Komatsu, Masafumi Mori, Keiichi Yamada, Masato Yamazaki, and Nobuo Fukuwa
: pp. 900-918
Sustainable Training-Model Development Based on Analysis of Disaster Medicine Training
Abstract
Please log in.
Shoichi Ohta, Munekazu Takeda, Ryo Sasaki, Hirotaka Uesugi, Hironobu Kamagata, Kentaro Kawai, Satomi Kuroshima, Michie Kawashima, Masaki Onishi, and Ikushi Yoda
: pp. 919-928
Critical Review of Japanese Disaster Medical Education for Citizens: Exploring the Method of Medutainment
Abstract
Please log in.
Ikushi Yoda, Momo Shiroyama, Hirotaka Uesugi, Hironobu Kamagata, and Shoichi Ohta
: pp. 929-938
Disaster Prevention Activities of Japanese Fire Companies
Abstract
Please log in.
Atsushi Sakuma, Ichiro Matsuo, Shin Ito, Shigeyoshi Tanaka, and Tsugio Nakaseko
: pp. 939-947
Optimal Life Recovery Assistance for Those Who Are Residing in Designated Temporary Housing in Widely Dispersed Locations: Interim Findings on Different Household Groups and on Life Recovery Promotion Parameters
Abstract
Please log in.
Shigeo Tatsuki
: pp. 948-955
Grasp of Utilization of Social Networking Services in Restoration Process – Interview Survey for N City-Related Citizens of the Great East Japan Earthquake –
Abstract
Please log in.
Shosuke Sato, Hiroko Koumoto, and Shigeo Tatsuki

Regular Papers

: pp. 957-965
Model of Tsunami Preparedness for Indonesian Tsunami Prone Areas Communities
Abstract
Please log in.
Any Nurhayaty, Supra Wimbarti, Radianta Triatmadja, and Thomas D. Hastjarjo
: pp. 966-972
Analysis of Factors Triggering Shallow Failure and Deep-Seated Landslides Induced by Single Rainfall Events
Abstract
Please log in.
Teng-To Yu, Ting-Shiuan Wang, and Youg-Sin Cheng
: pp. 973-980
Understanding Household Mobilization Time During Natech Accident Evacuation
Abstract
Please log in.
Junlei Yu and Akihiko Hokugo
: pp. 981-990
A Case Study on Estimation of Business Interruption Losses to Industrial Sectors Due to Flood Disasters
Abstract
Please log in.
Lijiao Yang, Hirokazu Tatano, Yoshio Kajitani, and Xinyu Jiang
: pp. 991-1000
Climate Change Impact on the Manageability of Floods and Droughts of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Basins Using Flood Duration Curves and Drought Duration Curves
Abstract
Please log in.
Muhammad Masood and Kuniyoshi Takeuchi

No.sp

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part IV

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part IV

: p. 709
the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part IV
Katsuki Takiguchi

The basic policy of the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), as a multidisciplinary academicjournal, is to cover all types of disasters ? except for war ? through a broad comprehensive perspective. Since its inaugural issue in August 2006, the JDR has been published bimonthly,with six issues a year. 2015 marks the tenth year since the JDRfs first issue. Among the many events happening during this decade is the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster which was induced by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake.This event had two major features ? that the tsunami accompanying the earthquake caused the main damage and that it triggered a nuclear hazard accident at a nuclear power plant. The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster was a unprecedented earthquake disaster called catastrophic hazard following two others ? the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake Disasterthat leveled Tokyo and the 1995 Hanshin Awaji Earthquake Disaster that destroyed parts of Osaka and Kobe. In view of this catastrophic hazardfs scale, the JDR decided to publish special annual issues on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster for five years since 2012 in addition to its regularissues. No publication fee was charged to contributors and support was asked from corporations. Papers on the special issues are published mainly online as an e-journal though printed editions are published for archival purposes. The current issue is the fourth of these special issues, and contributors have covered the 2011 disaster from many a wide range of perspectives. 21 papers were submitted and 8 papers are accepted for publication after peer review. The editors are confident that, like the previous three issues, this issue fully measure up to the quality that was expected for the special issue. I wish to express my gratitude to the contributors and reviewers and to thank corporations for their invaluable support.

: pp. 711-715
Safety of Food Produced in Japan: Past and Present Status of Radioactive Contamination
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideaki Karaki
: pp. 716-727
Public Health Concerns on Radiation Exposure After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident
Abstract
Please log in.
Reiko Kanda, Satsuki Tsuji, Hidenori Yonehara, and Masami Torikoshi
: pp. 728-735
Initial Responses of the Government of Japan to the Great East Japan Earthquake (Earthquake and Tsunami) and Lessons Learned from Them
Abstract
Please log in.
Akira Kotaki
: pp. 736-754
Research on Planning Process of Community Disaster Management Plan at Tsunami-Hit Area
Abstract
Please log in.
Tadahiro Yoshikawa
: pp. 755-769
Issues Facing Voluntary Evacuees from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Based on the Collection and Analysis of Cases of Voluntary Evacuation
Abstract
Please log in.
Kota Tomoyasu, Reo Kimura, Hitomi Mashima, and Ikuno Kazama
: pp. 770-776
Proposal for Robust Monitoring of Catastrophic Tsunami Using Onshore Strain and Tilt Geodetic Sensors
Abstract
Please log in.
Hiroaki Takahashi
: pp. 777-782
Business Continuity Management (BCM) for Regional Financial Functionalities in Wide-Area Disasters
Importance and Challenges in Cooperation
Among Regional Financial Institutions and PPP (Public-Private Partnership)
Abstract
Please log in.
Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 783-786
Application of Natural Disaster Information for Supply Chain Resilience
Abstract
Please log in.
Takahiro Ono and Kenji Watanabe

No.4

(Aug)

Celebrating 10th anniversary
Special Issue on Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies

Celebrating 10th anniversary

: p. 575
Message from Editors-in-Chief
Suminao Murakami and Katsuki Takiguchi
: p. 576
Congratulatory Message
Takashi Onishi
: pp. 577-578
Congratulatory Message
Hongey Chen
: p. 579
Congratulatory Message
Pierre Y. Julien
: p. 580
Disseminating Knowledge for Reducing Disaster Damage
Nobuo Shuto
: pp. 581-582
Promoting Disaster Resilience Around the World
Kenneth C. Topping

Special Issue on Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies

: p. 583
Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies
Tomonori Kawano, Kazuya Uezu, and Takaaki Kato

It’s a great pleasure and honor to publish the special issue on “Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies” in the Journal of Disaster Research. All of its 7 papers have been peerreviewed. We would like to extend our sincere thanks to the contributors and reviewers involved in producing these articles, especially to Dr. Masafumi Hosokawa, Chief, Planning for Community-Based Cooperation National Research Institute of Fire and Disaster, Fire and Disaster Management Agency Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications for his great support. The Research and Development center of Fire and Environmental Safety (RDFES) was established in April 2008 as a research institute within the Faculty of Environmental Engineering, the University of Kitakyushu. The RDFES is the first academic institute in Japan to contribute to environmental engineering and firefighting technology for social safety, and focuses on the environmental researches to overcome the worldwide serious firefighting problem, for example huge forest fires, and consequently contributes to create the epoch-making products for the environmental conservation and the safety of citizens. RDFES has become well known among firefighting professionals for its development of an “Environmentally friendly soap-based firefighting agent,” as well as new equipment that maximizes the effectiveness of the agent. This is just one example of successful collaboration between RDFES, the Kitakyushu City Fire and Disaster Management Department, a local soap company, and major firefighting enterprises in Japan. Today, RDFES is entering a new research area involving local communities and governments, which aims tomitigate and minimize the risk of fire and natural disasters. Researchers are engaged not only in the development of hardware but also in the creation of an organized social movement that could ensure more effective use of the hardware. We hope that the collaboration among industry, academia, and government will be more useful and powerful towards solving serious problems on “fire and environmental safety” through the mediation of this special issue. And reaching out to local communities reflects the center’s position to always welcome new partners to join our important and exciting research activities.

: pp. 584-585
Research and Development Efforts in Fire Safety and Disaster Preparedness
Abstract
Please log in.
Masafumi Hosokawa
: pp. 586-594
Fire Protection Analysis and Potential Improvements for Wooden Cultural Heritage Sites in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Kwang-Il Kim, Tadashi Konishi, Tomek Ziemba, Hirofumi Nonaka, Ki-Hun Nam, and Takeyoshi Tanaka
: pp. 595-603
A New Concept for Development of Quartz Crystal Microbalance Fire Prevention Sensors Modified with Nano-Assembled Thin Films
Abstract
Please log in.
Seung-Woo Lee
: pp. 604-612
Learning from the Eco-Toxicology of Fire-Fighting Foams in Aquatic Organisms: Altered Eco-Toxicity of Sodium Alkyl Sulfonates on Green Paramecia and Medaka Fish Maintained in Different Waters
Abstract
Please log in.
Kaishi Goto, Hiroshi Takaichi, and Tomonori Kawano
: pp. 613-619
Development of Firefighting Equipment for Efficient Firefighting Strategy (Development of New Hose)
Abstract
Please log in.
Yoshiaki Miyazato, Takumi Sasaki, Masaki Sakaguchi, and Atsushi Nakamura
: pp. 620-626
Development of Firefighting Equipment for Efficient Firefighting Strategy (Development of New Nozzle)
Abstract
Please log in.
Takumi Sasaki, Yoshiaki Miyazato, Junji Inamoto, Takahiro Yamamoto, and Atsushi Nakamura
: pp. 627-634
Investigating the Gap Between Actual and Perceived Distance from a Nuclear Power Plant: A Case Study in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Takaaki Kato, Shogo Takahara, and Toshimitsu Homma
: pp. 635-640
The Rise and Fall of the Kobe Economy from the 1995 Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasuhide Okuyama

Regular Papers

: pp. 641-646
Compared Modeling Study of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking at Dissimilar Weld of Alloy 182 of Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor According to Hydrogen Concentration
Abstract
Please log in.
Omar F. Aly, Miguel M. Neto, Mônica M. A. M. Schvartzman, and Luciana I. L. Lima
: pp. 647-654
Performance Evaluation of Base-Isolated Structures
Abstract
Please log in.
Sarun Chimamphant and Kazuhiko Kasai
: pp. 655-666
Analysis of Radio Wave Propagation in an Urban Environment and its Application to Initial Disaster Response Support
Abstract
Please log in.
Youhei Kawamura, Hyongdoo Jang, Markus Wagner, Hajime Nobuhara, Ashraf M. Dewan, Bert Veenendaal, and Itaru Kitahara
: pp. 667-677
Ground Motion Estimation Using Front Site Wave Form Data Based on RVM for Earthquake Early Warning
Abstract
Please log in.
Yincheng Yang and Masato Motosaka
: pp. 678-686
Hazard Perception and Anchoring: A Comparison of the Three Models Explaining the Anchoring Effect
Abstract
Please log in.
Kazuhisa Nagaya and Kazuya Nakayachi
: pp. 687-692
Voluntary Isolation After the Disaster: The Loss of Community and Family in the Super Aged Society in Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Kanako Sasaki and Miyako Sakurai

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Adaptation Measures for Disasters due to Climate Change

Special Issue on Adaptation Measures for Disasters due to Climate Change

: pp. 403-402
Adaptation Measures for Disasters due to Climate Change
Toshimitsu Komatsu

An increase in natural hazards due to global warming has broadened the gap between natural hazards and disaster prevention. This gap has raised the possibility that unexpected major disasters occur. As chances of a natural hazard grow, appropriate and efficient adaptation is considered as a last resort for lessening disaster. In water-related disasters such as floods and debris flows, individual disaster sites have specific thresholds (limits). When a natural hazard exceeds this threshold, a serious disaster strikes us. On the contrary when it is under the limit, disaster damage is kept to be small. Flood disasters and landslides have the side of gall or nothing.h This is a characteristic of water-related disasters. Climate change is causing natural hazards to exceed this threshold easily. This makes resilient proactive adaptation very important in disaster prevention. Specific adaptation measures developed hereafter must cope with serious water and sediment disasters throughout mountainous regions, rivers, urban areas, and coastal areas that are assumed to be influenced by global warming. The Journal of Disaster Research has planned a special issue on the adaptation measures for disasters due to climate change. Having taken part in field surveys, computer simulations, and laboratory experiments and finding adaptation measures worth studying more deeply, I decided to contribute to this special issue as a Guest Editor. All of its 11 papers have been peer-reviewed. The broad topics covered range from floods, landslides, and storm surges to adaptation to the human being society. I would like to extend my sincere thanks to the contributors and reviewers involved in producing these articles, especially to Dr. Hideo Oshikawa, Assistant Professor of the Department of Urban and Environment Engineering, Kyushu University, Japan, for his great support. I look forward with great anticipation to feedback from readers regarding these articles.

: pp. 404-419
Challenges of Implementing Climate Change Adaptation Policy for Disaster Risk Reduction – Implications from Framing Gap Among Stakeholders and the General Public –
Abstract
Please log in.
Kenshi Baba and Mitsuru Tanaka
: pp. 420-428
Analysis of Ideal Directions of Climate Change Adaptation and Problems in Implementing Them for Local Japanese Governments
Abstract
Please log in.
Nobuo Shirai and Mitsuru Tanaka
: pp. 429-435
Meteorological Characteristics of Local Heavy Rainfall in the Fukuoka Plain
Abstract
Please log in.
Yukiko Hisada, Yuji Sugihara, and Nobuhiro Matsunaga
: pp. 436-447
Numerical Experiments on Spatially Averaged Precipitation in Heavy Rainfall Event Using the WRF Model
Abstract
Please log in.
Yuji Sugihara, Sho Imagama, Nobuhiro Matsunaga, and Yukiko Hisada
: pp. 448-456
Bias Correction in Typhoon and Storm Surge Projection Considering Characteristics of Global Climate Model MRI-AGCM3.2S
Abstract
Please log in.
Noriaki Hashimoto, Yukihiro Kinashi, Tomoko Kawashima, Masaki Yokota, Masaru Yamashiro, and Mitsuyoshi Kodama
: pp. 457-466
Evaluation of Inhibitory Effect by Adaptation Measures for Red Soil Runoff from Farmland due to Heavy Rainfall
Abstract
Please log in.
Noriyuki Yasufuku, Kohei Araki, Kiyoshi Omine, Kenichiro Okumura, and Kohei Iwami
: pp. 467-474
An Experimental Study on Flood Control Capability of Dry Dams Constructed in a Series
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideo Oshikawa, Yuka Mito, and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 475-485
Flood Control Mechanism of Multiple Dams Constructed in a Series Based on Cascade Method
Abstract
Please log in.
Hideo Oshikawa and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 486-494
Growth of Mangrove Forests and the Influence on Flood Disaster at Amami Oshima Island, Japan
Abstract
Please log in.
Akira Tai, Akihiro Hashimoto, Takuya Oba, Kazuki Kawai, Kazuaki Otsuki, Hiromitsu Nagasaka, and Tomonori Saita
: pp. 495-502
Clarification and Application of Inundation Processes in Basins with Insufficient Observation Devices Installed
Abstract
Please log in.
Akihiro Hashimoto, Akira Tai, and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 503-511
Compound Strategy Forward to Compound Disaster Mitigation: Lessons from Hsiaolin Village, Typhoon Morakot 2009
Abstract
Please log in.
Wen-Chi Lai, Yuan-Jung Tsai, and Chjeng-Lun Shieh

Regular Papers

: pp. 513-526
Applying Risk Analysis to the Disaster Impact of Extreme Typhoon Events Under Climate Change
Abstract
Please log in.
Hsin-Chi Li, Shiao-Ping Wei, Chao-Tzuen Cheng, Jun-Jih Liou, Yung-Ming Chen, and Keh-Chia Yeh
: pp. 527-534
Finite Element Reliability Analysis of Steel Containment Vessels with Corrosion Damage
Abstract
Please log in.
Xiaolei Wang and Dagang Lu
: pp. 535-550
Development of Science-Based Decision Support System for Evaluating the Safety of Evacuation Facilities in Case of Torrential Rains
Abstract
Please log in.
Hidetomo Miyake, Haruo Hayashi, Shingo Suzuki, and Takahiro Nishino
: pp. 551-557
Brief Report of Shaking Table Test on Masonry Building Strengthened with Ferrocement Layers
Abstract
Please log in.
Teddy Boen, Hiroshi Imai, Febrin Ismail, Toshikazu Hanazato, and Lenny

No.2

(Apr)

Selected Papers from TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata
Abstracts of presentations at TIEMS 2014

Selected Papers from TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata

: pp. 187-188
Selected Papers from TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata
Keiko Tamura and Haruo Hayashi

TIEMS – The International Emergency Society founded in 1993 – is a global forum for education, training, certification and policy in emergency and disaster management. TIEMS is dedicated to developing a safer world by bringing the benefits of modern emergency management tools, techniques and good industry practice. The Japan Chapter of TIEMS was established in 2011 when Japan members agreed on the great worth of the Society’s mission.

The Japan Chapter organized the Oct. 20-23, 2014, TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata. Niigata was chosen because the year 2014 had a special meaning in the history of disasters in Japan. That is, the memorials of four major disasters had memorial anniversaries in that year – the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Niigata Earthquake, the 40th anniversary of the 1974 Niigata Yakeyama Volcano eruption, and the 10th anniversaries of the 2004 Niigata-Fukushima flood and Niigata-Chuetsu earthquake. The event brought over 1,000 domestic and international participants together to discuss risk management and resilience against disasters. The event also provided many opportunities for participants to share their scientific knowledge learn about the lessons from past experience of practitioners in the disaster management field and view the industry exhibition emerging to a wide variety of experience in disaster response.

With so many experts and practitioners willing to make presentations at the Conference, the JDR has brought together selected 17 papers and other output from them. My colleagues and I am honored to make these TIEMS 2014 achievements known to the broadest possible audience, and we are assured that this will create many fruitful outcomes for our reading audience.

: pp. 189-195
Developing a Web-Based Platform to Share Disaster Risk Reduction Technology
Abstract
Please log in.
Young-Jai Lee
: pp. 196-203
Comparison Between the Life Recovery Processes After the Mid-Niigata Earthquake and the Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake – Results of a Random Sampled Social Survey Using the Life Recovery Calendar and GIS-Based Spatiotemporal Analysis
Abstract
Please log in.
Reo Kimura, Munenari Inoguchi, Keiko Tamura, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 204-209
Area Business Continuity Management, A New Approach to Sustainable Local Economy
Abstract
Please log in.
H. Baba, T. Watanabe, K. Miyata, and H. Matsumoto
: pp. 210-216
Attempt to Typify Disaster Educational Programs – Case Study of the Disaster Management Education Challenge Plan
Abstract
Please log in.
Kota Tomoyasu, Reo Kimura, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 217-224
Development of Web-Based Tabletop Emergency Earthquake Exercise System
Abstract
Please log in.
Bojia Zhou, Gang Sun, Xiaoyong Zhang, Jianhua Xu, Junyan Lai, Xiaoxia Du, Masafumi Hosokawa, Haruo Hayashi, Reo Kimura, and Yukihisa Sakurada
: pp. 225-230
Integration of GIS with Remote Sensing and GPS for Disaster Mitigation
Abstract
Please log in.
Sikander Nawaz Khan
: pp. 231-237
Dynamic Simulation Research of Overburden Strata Failure Characteristics and Stress Dependence of Metal Mine
Abstract
Please log in.
Kang Zhao, Zhongqun Guo, and Youzhi Zhang
: pp. 238-245
Current Issues Regarding the Incident Command System in the Philippines
Abstract
Please log in.
Miho Ohara and Hisaya Sawano
: pp. 246-251
Manage Everything or Anything? Possible Ways Towards Generic Emergency Management Capabilities
Abstract
Please log in.
Jonas Borell
: pp. 252-262
A Study on the Practical Ways of Implementing a Street-Wide BCP Exercise in the Banking Industry
Abstract
Please log in.
Yasutake Sayanagi and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 263-269
Development of NERSS Training Program for Earthquake Emergency Response Capacity Building of Local Governments
Abstract
Please log in.
Junyan Lai, Lu Ding, Yuan Zhang, Weimin Wu, Haruo Hayashi, Reo Kimura, Masafumi Hosokawa, and Yukihisa Sakurada
: pp. 270-275
Blackout 2014 Exercise – Prague, the Capital of the Czech Republic
Abstract
Please log in.
Tomas Hudecek, Josef Juránek, and Jaroslav Pejcoch
: pp. 276-287
Comparative Analysis of Earthquake Emergency Response in China and Japan Based on Timeline: 311 Earthquake vs 512 Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Xiaoxia Du, Jun Zhang, Jianhua Xu, Zhuan He, Junyan Lai, Yigang Li, Reo Kimura, Haruo Hayashi, Masafumi Hosokawa, and Yukihisa Sakurada
: pp. 288-298
Local People’s Responses to Flood Disasters in Flood Prone Areas of Northeast Bangladesh
Abstract
Please log in.
Naoki Yamashita and Terunori Ohmoto
: pp. 299-307
Current Relocation Practices Targeting Disaster Prone Communities in Developing Countries: Case Study San Francisco Libre, Nicaragua
Abstract
Please log in.
Judith Cuadra, Janet Dilling, Ralph Brower, and Malaika Samples
: pp. 308-318
Understanding Flood Risks for Better Planning and Resilience: Novel Stochastic Models and Methods for South-East Asia
Abstract
Please log in.
Julien Oliver, Ole Larsen, Mads Rasmussen, Erickson Lanuza, and Avinash Chakravarthy
: pp. 319-325
The Resilient Smart City (An Proposal)
Abstract
Please log in.
Yukio Fujinawa, Ryoichi Kouda, and Yoichi Noda

Abstracts of presentations at TIEMS 2014

: pp. 327-362
Abstracts of presentations at TIEMS 2014 Annual Conference
Abstract
Please log in.
 

Regular Papers

: pp. 363-372
Cross-Organizational Information Sharing and Coordination in Disaster Response: The Case of the 2008 Wenchuan China Earthquake
Abstract
Please log in.
Enyan Wang, Dequan Zheng, and Xiangyang Li
: pp. 373-385
Improvement of Reception and Transmission Performance on Early Warning System for Multi Country with QZSS Augmentation Signal
Abstract
Please log in.
Daisuke Iwaizumi, Shota Iino, Hiroki Satoh, Mitsuaki Takaishi, Naoki Iso, and Naohiko Kohtake

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines

: pp. 5-7
Enhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines
Hiroshi Inoue and Renato U. Solidum, Jr.

This special issue of JDR features 18 papers and reports on an international 2010 to 2015 cooperative project entitled gEnhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines.h This project is being conducted under the SATREPS program (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development), cosponsored by the JST (Japan Science and Technology Agency) and JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency).

The Philippines is one of the worldfs most earthquake and volcano disaster-prone countries because it is located along the active boundary between the Philippine Sea Plate and Eurasian Plate. Collisions by the two plates generate plate subductions and crustal stress that generates earthquakes and volcanic activities on the archipelago.

The Philippines has experienced numerous disastrous earthquakes, the most recent being the 1990 M7.8 Luzon earthquake, which killed over 1,000 local residents. A damaging earthquake also occurred during this 5-year project, in October 2013, on Bohol Island, causing about 200 deaths when houses and other buildings collapsed.

Volcanoes are another major killer in the Philippines. The largest in the last century was when the Taal volcano erupted in 1911, killing 1,300 by a base surge. The 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption is known as the largest volcanic event in the 20th century. The Mayon volcano is also known to be a beautiful but dangerous volcano that frequently erupts, causing lahars ? steaming moving fluid masses of volcanic debris and water ? that damaged villages at the foot of the mountain.

The PHIVOLCS (Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology), a governmental agency mandated to monitor earthquakes and volcanoes, provides earthquake and volcano information and alerts to the public. It also conducts research on the mechanisms behind such natural phenomena and on evaluating such hazards and risks. The PHIVOLCSfs other mission is educating people and society on being prepared for disasters. Earthquake and volcano bulletins and alerts, research output, and educational materials and training provided by PHIVOLCS have enriched knowledge and enhanced measures against disaster