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JDR Vol.14 No.8 pp. 1024-1029
(2019)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2019.p1024

Paper:

Analysis of the Attitude Within Asia-Pacific Countries Towards Disaster Risk Reduction: Text Mining of the Official Statements of 2018 Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

Daisuke Sasaki

International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS), Tohoku University
468-1 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-0845, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
May 7, 2019
Accepted:
July 15, 2019
Published:
November 1, 2019
Keywords:
Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 (SFDRR), text mining, official statements, Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), climate change
Abstract

This study aims to investigate the attitude within Asia-Pacific countries towards disaster risk reduction (DRR) through text mining of the official statements of the 2018 Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. The official statements can be considered as a proxy of the participating countries’ stances on DRR. As methodology, four different kinds of text mining techniques were adopted; namely, word frequency list, hierarchical cluster analysis, co-occurrence network, and correspondence analysis for the sake of quantitative content analysis. Consequently, the word frequency list showed that words such as “development (develop)” and “climate change” seemed to be distinctive of the conference focusing on DRR issues. The result of hierarchical cluster analysis seemed to imply that the participating countries, namely their governments, had appeared to be keen to implement the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 (SFDRR) along with their national DRR policies and to connect DRR with their development, while climate change had not been directly linked to the SFDRR and was stated as another global issue closely related to DRR. Considering that the SFDRR is closely related to the SDGs and the Paris Agreement, the observation of these contrasting results of the text mining analysis is a noteworthy finding. The result is also consistent with that of the co-occurrence network. The result of the correspondence analysis implied that the statement announced by Japan had appeared to have a characteristic feature in comparison to other statements. One possible reason for this is that there was no explicit reference to climate change, while the countries faced with disasters caused by climate change, such as those in the Pacific Islands, tended to focus on it.

Cite this article as:
D. Sasaki, “Analysis of the Attitude Within Asia-Pacific Countries Towards Disaster Risk Reduction: Text Mining of the Official Statements of 2018 Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.14, No.8, pp. 1024-1029, 2019.
Data files:
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Last updated on Dec. 10, 2019