single-dr.php

JDR Vol.13 No.6 pp. 1125-1141
(2018)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2018.p1125

Paper:

Differentiation and Integration of Evacuees with Regard to Lifting the Evacuation Order Following the Nuclear Power Plant Accident: A Case Study of Naraha and Tomioka Towns, Futaba District, Fukushima Prefecture

Michimasa Matsumoto

International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS), Tohoku University
6-6-11-901-2 Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
May 6, 2018
Accepted:
July 24, 2018
Published:
November 1, 2018
Keywords:
nuclear power plant accident, evacuation, return to town, differentiation, integration
Abstract

As of spring 2018, evacuation orders have been lifted from the entire area of Naraha Town and most of Tomioka, except for certain areas. While many evacuees have chosen their evacuation destinations as their permanent residences, some have returned to their former towns. This paper examines the factors involved in the “differentiation” and “integration” of Naraha and Tomioka residents before and after the disaster and the various forms they assume, based on the results of questionnaire surveys conducted in 2012 and 2015 as well as interviews conducted on a continuing basis since the disaster. In this process, it has become apparent that a split exists between Naraha, whose residents are moving toward “integration” with the lifting of the evacuation order, and Tomioka, whose residents are progressing toward “differentiation.”

Cite this article as:
M. Matsumoto, “Differentiation and Integration of Evacuees with Regard to Lifting the Evacuation Order Following the Nuclear Power Plant Accident: A Case Study of Naraha and Tomioka Towns, Futaba District, Fukushima Prefecture,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.13, No.6, pp. 1125-1141, 2018.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] R. Takagi, “Nuclear Accident Evacuees’ Living Reconstruction and its Task from Evacuation direction area, The Fukushima nuclear disaster, evacuation from the disaster-stricken areas and possibility of the energy shift,” K. Hasegawa and K. Yamamoto (eds.), Yuhikaku, 2017 (in Japanese).
  2. [2] R. Seki, “Sociology of Disaster and Evacuation,” Toshindo, 2018 (in Japanese).
  3. [3] N. Yoshihara, “Breakaway from Town of ‘Genpatsu-sama’: Community in the Future from a perspective of Okuma Town,” Iwanami-shoten, 2013 (in Japanese).
  4. [4] N. Yoshihara, “Despair and hope: Victims and communities in Fukushima,” Sakuhin-sha, 2016 (in Japanese).
  5. [5] W. Takahashi, T. Taguchi, and K. Matsui, “Nuclear Accident Evacuation and Emergent Support,” Honnoizumisha, 2016 (in Japanese).
  6. [6] K. Matsui, “Hometown Loss and Time of Regeneration: Sociology of Evacuation from Nuclear Accident and support in Nigata Pref.,” Toshindo, 2017 (in Japanese).
  7. [7] R. Putnam, “Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy,” Princeton University Press, 1993.
  8. [8] M. Matsumoto, “Survey analysis of coastal areas in Fukushima prefecture: The real situation and changes in the devastated communities,” Ochanomizu-shobo, 2015 (in Japanese).
  9. [9] M. Matsumoto, “Forms of Wide Area Community Association by Evacuees from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Actual Situation: A Case of Tomioka Town Fukushima,” N. Yoshihara, Y. Nihei, and M. Matsumoto (eds.), Records of the Victims’ Refuge Lives in the Great East Japan Earthquake, pp. 469-499, Rikka Press, 2015 (in Japanese).
  10. [10] M. Matsumoto, “Aspect of Long-term Evacuee’s Community and its Leader: A Case of Naraha and Tomioka Town in Fukushima,” N. Yoshihara, Y. Nihei, and M. Matsumoto (eds.), Records of the Victims’ Refuge Lives in the Great East Japan Earthquake, pp. 341-392, Rikka Press, 2015 (in Japanese).
  11. [11] M. Matsumoto, “Naraha Town Temporary Housing Residents’ Association at the Turning Point,” N. Yoshihara, K. Nitagai, and M. Matsumoto (eds.), Records of ‘Restoration’ of the Victims’ Refugee Lives in the Great East Japan Earthquake, pp. 207-247, Rikka Press, 2017 (in Japanese).
  12. [12] D. P. Aldrich, “Building Resilience: Social Capital in Post-Disaster Recovery,” The University of Chicago Press, 2012.
  13. [13] T. Fujimi, R. Kakimoto, F. Yamada, K. Matsuo, and M. Yamamoto, “Effects of social capital on public awareness of disaster prevention,” J. of Japan Society for Natural Disaster Science, Vol.29, No.4, pp. 487-499, 2011 (in Japanese).
  14. [14] T. Iwagaki, T. Inomata, K. Neyagawa, T. Kojima, H. Kumano, A. Ogihara, T. Tsujiuchi, K. Masuda, K. Komaki, C. Fukuda, R. Mochida, N. Ishikawa, Y. Akano, and M. Yamaguchi, “Relationships between Individual Social Capital and Mental Health in Elderly People who Left the Prefecture Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Disaster,” Japan J. Psychosom Med., Vol.57, No.2, pp. 173-184, 2017 (in Japanese).
  15. [15] K. Hasegawa and K. Yamamoto, “The Fukushima nuclear disaster, evacuation from the disaster-stricken areas and possibility of the energy shift,” Yuhikaku, 2017 (in Japanese).
  16. [16] K. Tamano, “Social Differentiation and Integration in an Urban Setting,” J. of the Faculty of Sociology, Ryutsu Keizai University, Vol.4, No.1, pp. 79-175, 1993 (in Japanese).
  17. [17] S. Kawazoe, “Circumstances Affecting the Acceptance of Nuclear Evacuees: The Case of Iwaki City,” Research on Environmental Disruption, Vol.42, No.4, pp. 37-41, 2013 (in Japanese).
  18. [18] R. Takagi and S. Kawazoe, “Prolonged Evacuation after Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Challenges in Hosting Community,” Refugee Studies J., Vol.6, pp. 23-41, 2016 (in Japanese).
  19. [19] Y. Hirota, “Hypotheses of Transnational Community Perspective,” Bulletin of Senshu University School of Human Sciences Sociology, Vol.3, No.2, pp. 71-80, 2013 (in Japanese).
  20. [20] M. Takahashi, “Integration Function of inducing evacuees to return hometown by festival: Summer festival and Ebisuko-ichi in 2017,” The 2018 Report of the Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research, 2018 (in press) (in Japanese).
  21. [21] N. Yoshihara, “Substratum of Community for disaster prevention,” Ochanomizu-shobo, 2011 (in Japanese).
  22. [22] J. Aiba, “Face the affected area: The path to reconstruction,” Elite-Jyohosha, 2016 (in Japanese).
  23. [23] M. Matsumoto, “Possibility of collaboration among association of temporary housing,” The 2016 Report of the Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research, pp. 77-98, 2017 (in Japanese).
  24. [24] N. Yoshihara, “True or False in Community,” S. Tanaka, H. Funabashi, and T. Masamura (eds.), The Great Eastern Japan Earthquake and Japanese sociology: how a country brought disaster upon itself, pp. 47-70, Iwanami-shoten, 2013 (in Japanese).
  25. [25] R. Solnit, “A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster,” Penguin Books, 2009.
  26. [26] M. Matsumoto, “Evacuees from Tomioka Town and Role of their Network Association at the Next Step for Choosing their Residence,” N. Yoshihara, K. Nitagi, and M. Matsumoto (eds.), Records of ‘Restoration’ of the Victims’ Refugee Lives in the Great East Japan Earthquake, pp. 248-273, Rikka Press, 2017 (in Japanese).
  27. [27] M. Matsumoto and A. Kanno, “Possibility of Salon where next generation congregate: a case of Futaba Future Meeting in phase 1,” The 2016 Report of the Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research, pp. 19-44, 2017 (in Japanese).

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, IE9,10,11, Opera.

Last updated on Dec. 11, 2018