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JDR Vol.12 No.1 pp. 131-136
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2017.p0131
(2017)

Paper:

Development of Tsunami Fragility Functions for Ground-Level Roads

Yoshihisa Maruyama and Osamu Itagaki

Department of Urban Environment Systems, Chiba University
1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
August 16, 2016
Accepted:
November 20, 2016
Published:
February 1, 2017
Keywords:
2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake, tsunami inundation depth, damage ratio of ground level road, topographical features
Abstract

In exploring the relationship between ground-level road damage ratios and tsunami inundation depths following the 2011 Pacific Coast Tohoku earthquake in Japan, we focused on road damage components, excluding elevated roads, bridges, and tunnels. The damage ratio is defined as the number of damage incidents per kilometer. We used the damage dataset compiled by the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport. We propose four fragility function zones for ground-level roads based on differences in topographical features. We studied these zones based on numerical simulation results of tsunami propagation.

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Last updated on Nov. 10, 2017