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JDR Vol.13 No.5 pp. 832-845
(2018)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2018.p0832

Paper:

Spatial Analysis of the Landslide Characteristics Caused by Heavy Rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July, 2017 Using Topography, Geology, and Rainfall Levels

Toru Danjo, Tomohiro Ishizawa, and Takashi Kimura

Storm, Flood and Landslide Research Division, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience
3-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0006, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
April 3, 2018
Accepted:
July 24, 2018
Published:
October 1, 2018
Keywords:
landslide, ArcGIS, heavy rainfall in Northern Kyushu District, spatial analysis
Abstract

The heavy rain in Northern Kyushu District on July 5, 2017 caused a sediment disaster, resulting in the loss of many lives and damage to buildings. In this study, the primary causes (topography and geology) and trigger factors (rainfall) for the sediment disaster were spatially analyzed to examine factors contributing to slope failure. As a result, it was found that the number of slope failures was highest in metamorphic rock areas and the occurrence density of the landslides was highest in plutonic rock areas. In addition, the slope angle of the slope-failure source point was sizable in volcanic rock areas and many landslides occurred in the valley-formed areas. A rainfall analysis showed that the Akatani, Shirakitani, Sozu, Kita, Naragaya, Myoken, Katsura river basins and Ono, Ohi, Sata, Inaibaru river basins are different rainfall distributions, which significantly affected the slope-failure occurrence density.

Cite this article as:
T. Danjo, T. Ishizawa, and T. Kimura, “Spatial Analysis of the Landslide Characteristics Caused by Heavy Rainfall in the Northern Kyushu District in July, 2017 Using Topography, Geology, and Rainfall Levels,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.13, No.5, pp. 832-845, 2018.
Data files:
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Last updated on Dec. 18, 2018