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JDR Vol.17 No.2 pp. 230-236
(2022)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2022.p0230

Note:

Extreme Solar Flare as a Catastrophic Risk

Hiroaki Isobe*,†, Takuya Takahashi**, Daikichi Seki*, and Yosuke Yamashiki*

*Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University
1 Nakaadachi-cho, Yoshida, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8306, Japan

Corresponding author

**Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Received:
March 9, 2017
Accepted:
December 28, 2021
Published:
February 1, 2022
Keywords:
solar flares, space weather, space utilization
Abstract

Space weather, or the disturbances of the plasma environment driven by the magnetic activities in the Sun in geospace, has become a potential source of disaster for modern society, which is increasingly dependent on its space infrastructure and large-scale power grids. Recently, independent pieces of evidence have been found that support the possibility of extremely intense space weather driven by a “superflare,” a solar phenomenon that modern society has never experienced. This paper reviews state-of-art studies of superflares and their potential impacts.

Cite this article as:
Hiroaki Isobe, Takuya Takahashi, Daikichi Seki, and Yosuke Yamashiki, “Extreme Solar Flare as a Catastrophic Risk,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.17, No.2, pp. 230-236, 2022.
Data files:
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Last updated on May. 20, 2022