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JDR Vol.17 No.3 pp. 399-408
(2022)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2022.p0399

Paper:

Verification of Damage Caused by the Genroku Earthquake and Tsunami from Tomb Stones

Hiroyuki Kaneko

Itoh City Cultural Property Management Center
3-11 Takenodai, Itoh, Shizuoka 414-0026, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
August 18, 2021
Accepted:
December 24, 2021
Published:
April 1, 2022
Keywords:
Genroku earthquake and tsunami, tsunami victims, tomb stones, Buddhist names
Abstract

The Genroku earthquake and tsunami were the largest disaster in Japan during the Edo period. The earthquake occurred late at night on November 23, 1703, and widespread house collapses and fires in cities in Kanto region, including Edo (the old name of Tokyo) and Odawara. Following this, a huge tsunami hit the Pacific coast, which killed tens of thousands of people who lived there. This paper discusses a part of the actual situation of the tsunami disaster based on the tomb erected for the victims, as well as of the Buddhist memorial services held, such as kaimyo (posthumous Buddhist names), written on the tomb stones, ihai (Buddhist spirit tables), and kuyo-tou (memorial pagodas).

Cite this article as:
H. Kaneko, “Verification of Damage Caused by the Genroku Earthquake and Tsunami from Tomb Stones,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.17, No.3, pp. 399-408, 2022.
Data files:
References
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Last updated on Sep. 27, 2022