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JDR Vol.15 No.7 pp. 975-980
(2020)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2020.p0975

Survey Report:

Implementation of Post Disaster Needs Assessment in Indonesia: Literature Review

Yasuhito Jibiki*,†, Dicky Pelupessy**, Daisuke Sasaki***, and Kanako Iuchi***

*Next Generation Volcano Researcher Development Program, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University
6-3 Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578, Japan

Corresponding author

**Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia

***International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS), Tohoku University, Miyagi, Japan

Received:
June 2, 2020
Accepted:
July 30, 2020
Published:
December 1, 2020
Keywords:
Indonesia, Post Disaster Needs Assessment (PDNA), literature review, BNPB, Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA)
Abstract

This paper shares key findings from past studies on Post Disaster Needs Assessment (PDNA) in Indonesia, to be used as inputs for future research. We used Google Scholar to identify the relevant articles for analysis. From the 297 results obtained, we selected 25 materials, which are reviewed in detail. We classified the findings in the selected literature into 4 topics. (1) Cases of PDNA implementation in Indonesia: many studies deal with the Indian Ocean Tsunami and the Central Java Earthquake. (2) Policy aspects: the previous literature demonstrated PDNA policies and regulations, on which not only the National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) but also others (e.g., Ministry of Home Affairs) have primary jurisdiction. (3) Coordination of implementation: coordination by the local disaster management agencies (BPBD) when facing challenges. (4) Methodological issues: the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) methodology does not perfectly fit in practice. One of the most significant implications drawn from the review is that more research is needed to examine policy aspects. The existing studies tend to focus mainly on BNPB, and such BNPB-centric perspectives prevented a comprehensive identification of the relevant actors, leading to a narrow range of analysis on PDNA. Our review suggests that changing viewpoints, being mindful of the BNPB function, is beneficial for further understanding PDNA implementation in Indonesia.

Cite this article as:
Yasuhito Jibiki, Dicky Pelupessy, Daisuke Sasaki, and Kanako Iuchi, “Implementation of Post Disaster Needs Assessment in Indonesia: Literature Review,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.15, No.7, pp. 975-980, 2020.
Data files:
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