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JDR Vol.17 No.5 pp. 663-669
(2022)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2022.p0663

Paper:

Fracture Structures in and Around Hakone Volcano Revealed by Dense Seismic Observations

Ryou Honda*,†, Yuki Abe*, Yohei Yukutake**, and Shin’ichi Sakai***

*Hot Springs Research Institute of Kanagawa Prefecture (HSRI)
586 Iriuda, Odawara, Kanagawa 250-0031, Japan

Corresponding author

**Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

***Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Received:
January 15, 2022
Accepted:
May 11, 2022
Published:
August 1, 2022
Keywords:
Hakone volcano, fracture system, S-wave splitting, fuzzy c-means clustering
Abstract

Preexisting fracture systems, including old fissures, dikes, and microfractures in the caldera, are possibly used as channels for magma and hydrothermal fluid intrusions during an eruption. To reveal such a fracture system in the Hakone volcano, we used the fuzzy c-means method to perform clustering on S-wave splitting analysis results. The results show that the fracture system in the Hakone caldera can be divided into two clusters (A and B) or four clusters (A1, A2, B1, and B2). In the central cone vicinity, craters or dikes corresponding to the compressive axis of the regional stress field are dominant, whereas the fault systems with the best orientation to the regional stress field develop around the central cone. Cluster B1 can be explained by the northwest–southeast alignment of micro cracks or dikes corresponding to the direction of maximum horizontal pressure of the regional stress field. The others are likely explained by fault fracture zones, which have an optimal orientation for regional stress fields, or by the alignment of micro cracks affected by the local stress field. Cluster B2 suggests the existence of fracture zones of the Tanna and Hirayama fault systems, which cross the Hakone volcano from north to south. Clusters A1 and A2 are possibly explained by the conjugate system of B2. However, the alignment of micro cracks generated by the local stress field or old volcanic structures can also be a cause of the clusters.

Cite this article as:
R. Honda, Y. Abe, Y. Yukutake, and S. Sakai, “Fracture Structures in and Around Hakone Volcano Revealed by Dense Seismic Observations,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.17, No.5, pp. 663-669, 2022.
Data files:
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Last updated on Aug. 05, 2022