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JDR Vol.16 No.2 pp. 170-175
(2021)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2021.p0170

Letter:

Geotourism and Disaster Storytelling: Lessons from 2013 Izu-Oshima Island Debris Flow Disaster

Kana Nishitani*1, Kazuyuki Nakagawa*2, and Shingo Nagamatsu*3,*4,†

*1Global Nature Club
1-74 Aza Kitano, Motomachi, Osima, Tokyo 100-0101, Japan

*2Jiji Press Ltd., Tokyo, Japan

*3Faculty of Societal Safety Sciences, Kansai University, Osaka, Japan

*4National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED), Ibaraki, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
September 1, 2020
Accepted:
December 24, 2020
Published:
February 1, 2021
Keywords:
geotourism, disaster storytelling, risk communication, debris flow disaster
Abstract

This report supports geotourism as an effective method of disaster storytelling, based on the lessons learned during and after the 2013 Izu-Oshima Island Debris Flow Disaster. Geotourism can provide a geological explanation to visitors as to why the disaster occurred in Izu-Oshima island, while also allowing a vital opportunity to help local people impacted by the disaster make sense of their catastrophic experiences. By doing so, individuals involved in geotourism can share a reverence and respect for the living Earth, which enables us to move forward even after experiencing a catastrophic disaster. This function is very similar to what Disaster Storytelling has.

Cite this article as:
Kana Nishitani, Kazuyuki Nakagawa, and Shingo Nagamatsu, “Geotourism and Disaster Storytelling: Lessons from 2013 Izu-Oshima Island Debris Flow Disaster,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.16, No.2, pp. 170-175, 2021.
Data files:
References
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  7. [7] Disaster Reduction and Human Renovation Institution (DRI), “2020 International Forum on Telling Live Lessons from Disasters,” DRI Technical Report Series, No.46, 2020.

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Last updated on Jun. 17, 2021