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JDR Vol.13 No.7 pp. 1187-1192
(2018)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2018.p1187

Paper:

Formalizing the Concept of “Build Back Better” Based on the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017 WG4

Keiko Tamura*,†, Irina Rafliana**, and Paul Kovacs***

*Risk Management Office, Niigata University
8050 Ikarachi-Nino-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181, Japan

Corresponding author

**Indonesian Institute of Science, Research Center for Oceanography (LIPI), Jakarta Utara, Indonesia

***Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction, Ontario, Canada

Received:
July 9, 2018
Accepted:
November 5, 2018
Published:
December 1, 2018
Keywords:
Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, physical recovery, case studies, well-being, sustainable development
Abstract

This paper outlines the process of formalizing Priority Action 4, “Build Back Better,” in recovery, rehabilitation, and reconstruction in Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030. We propose this formalization by introducing the background and existing framework of recovery, rehabilitation, and reconstruction, a case-study of Post-War Japan, and the outcome of discussions implemented in the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017 held at the Science Council of Japan in Tokyo on November 23–25, 2017. This paper also summarizes the results of discussions regarding further development of Priority Action 4.

Cite this article as:
K. Tamura, I. Rafliana, and P. Kovacs, “Formalizing the Concept of “Build Back Better” Based on the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017 WG4,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.13, No.7, pp. 1187-1192, 2018.
Data files:
References
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Last updated on Dec. 13, 2018