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JDR Vol.16 No.2 pp. 216-223
(2021)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2021.p0216

Survey Report:

Learning from the Training for the Successors and Storytellers the Legacy of Atomic Bombing in Hiroshima City: Lessons for Disaster Storytellers

Shosuke Sato*,† and Masahiro Iwasaki**

*International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS), Tohoku University
468-1 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8572, Japan

Corresponding author

**Survey Research Center Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan

Received:
August 3, 2020
Accepted:
October 13, 2020
Published:
February 1, 2021
Keywords:
disaster tradition, disaster storytelling, personnel training development of the next generation, spitting image, atomic bombing experience
Abstract

Development of a “disaster storyteller (relater)” training program is necessary for sustainable and effective disaster management and tradition. In this paper, we observed a training program of atomic bombing storytellers (relater), who survived the bombing of Hiroshima, and legacy successors, who did not experience it. In addition, we conducted an interview survey of the Hiroshima City Hall administrative staff and eight tellers who completed the course program, as well as an analysis of training log data. The results showed that all interviewees who completed the program evaluated it positively, and many active storytellers completed the training every year. Finally, a standard training program for disaster storytellers was designed and proposed based on survey results.

Cite this article as:
Shosuke Sato and Masahiro Iwasaki, “Learning from the Training for the Successors and Storytellers the Legacy of Atomic Bombing in Hiroshima City: Lessons for Disaster Storytellers,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.16, No.2, pp. 216-223, 2021.
Data files:
References
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Last updated on Sep. 14, 2021