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JDR Vol.13 No.7 pp. 1181-1186
(2018)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2018.p1181

Paper:

Investing in Disaster Risk Reduction for Resilience: Roles of Science, Technology, and Education

Akiyuki Kawasaki*,† and Jakob Rhyner**

*Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Tokyo
7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan

Corresponding author

**United Nations University, Bonn, Germany

Received:
September 23, 2018
Accepted:
October 23, 2018
Published:
December 1, 2018
Keywords:
investment, resilience, Private Public Partnership, human capital, Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
Abstract

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 established “Investing in Disaster Risk Reduction for Resilience” as Priority Action 3 with 17 actions in national and local levels and 9 actions in global and regional levels. So far, however, the budgets for disaster risk reduction are mainly used for post-disaster emergency response, recovery, and reconstruction in many countries. In the working sessions of Priority Action 3 of the Global Forum on Science and Technology for Disaster Resilience 2017, we discussed the actions that should be taken by the science, technology, and education sectors for an increase in proactive disaster risk reduction investment. This paper highlights the working group discussion, particularly focusing on the roles of science, technology, and education. Seven recommendations for promoting the implementation of the Priority Action 3 were adopted by the Forum as the final output from the working sessions of Priority Action 3.

Cite this article as:
A. Kawasaki and J. Rhyner, “Investing in Disaster Risk Reduction for Resilience: Roles of Science, Technology, and Education,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.13, No.7, pp. 1181-1186, 2018.
Data files:
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Last updated on Dec. 13, 2018