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JDR Vol.17 No.6 pp. 1080-1089
(2022)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2022.p1080

Paper:

Eruptive Volume and Age of Large-Scale Pumice Eruptions of the Asama-Maekake Volcano, Central Japan, as Revealed by Detailed Trench Surveys: Implications for Future Volcanic Hazards

Masaki Takahashi*,†, Maya Yasui**, Tatsuo Kanamaru**, and Mitsuhiro Nakagawa***

*Institute of Natural Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University
3-25-40 Sakurajosui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550, Japan

Corresponding author

**Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan

***Department of Natural History Sciences, Graduate School of Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

Received:
November 10, 2021
Accepted:
July 28, 2022
Published:
October 1, 2022
Keywords:
Asama-Maekake volcano, tephra, eruption rate, step diagram, volcanic hazard
Abstract

The eruptive volumes and ages of the large-scale pumice eruptions of the Asama-Maekake volcano were obtained from extensive trench-based surveys. The calibrated radiocarbon age unit (CRAU) was adopted instead of each calibrated radiocarbon age. From the high-resolution tephro-stratigraphy of large-scale pumice eruptions and CRAU dating, the eruptive history of the Asama-Maekake volcano is divided into three active and two moderately active stages as follows: active stage I (9430 to 7260 ycalBP), moderately active stage 1 (7261 to 6446 ycalBP), active stage II (6447 to 3160 ycalBP), moderately active stage 2 (3161 to 1819 ycalBP), and active stage III (1820 ycalBP to present). The eruptions of the Asama-Maekake volcano consists of small-scale (phreatic to phreato-magmatic), intermediate-scale (Vulcanian), and large-scale pumice eruptions (sub-Plinian). The active stages were characterized by the occurrence of large-scale pumice eruptions. In the moderately active stages, pumice producing eruptions were lacking but instead Vulcanian eruptions dominated. A step diagram showing the relationship between eruption volumes (DRE) and ages (CRAU) is proposed, which indicates that active stage III is not time-predictable but is volume-predictable; if the large-scale pumice eruption occurs in 2022 AD, the forecasted eruptive volume is approximately 0.21 km3. The eruption rate is not constant and changes in each stage, and the average eruption rate of active stage III (0.0011 km3/year) is larger than those of active stage I (0.00006 km3/year) and II (0.0001 km3/year).

Cite this article as:
M. Takahashi, M. Yasui, T. Kanamaru, and M. Nakagawa, “Eruptive Volume and Age of Large-Scale Pumice Eruptions of the Asama-Maekake Volcano, Central Japan, as Revealed by Detailed Trench Surveys: Implications for Future Volcanic Hazards,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.17, No.6, pp. 1080-1089, 2022.
Data files:
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Last updated on Dec. 01, 2022