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JDR Vol.14 No.9 pp. 1277-1286
(2019)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2019.p1277

Paper:

Livelihood Re-Establishment of Emigrants from Kiribati in Fiji

Miko Maekawa*,†, Priyatma Singh**, Dhrishna Charan**, Nagisa Yoshioka*, and Takuia Uakeia***

*The Ocean Policy Research Institute, Sasakawa Peace Foundation
1-15-16 Toranomon, Minato, Tokyo 105-8524, Japan

Corresponding author

**School of Science & Technology, Department of Science, The University of Fiji, Lautoka, Fiji

***The University of the South Pacific, Kiribati Campus, Tarawa, Republic of Kiribati

Received:
May 31, 2019
Accepted:
August 5, 2019
Published:
December 1, 2019
Keywords:
climate change, education, Kiribati, migration, sea level rise
Abstract

People from Kiribati, especially after obtaining college degrees, tend to have a desire to migrate abroad to obtain further education and good jobs and, to some extent, due to the impacts of climate change. Nineteen percent of I-Kiribati migrants in Fiji who responded to our survey indicated climate change as a factor for their migration, but their primary reasons were to seek better education and employment. When seeking employment, their lack of English-language skills and professional qualifications posed challenges. However, those who had prepared well in advance tend to find jobs relatively smoothly after migration. When settling in a new area, people tended to rely on family connections, community groups, and other social supports as sources of network and safety net.

Cite this article as:
M. Maekawa, P. Singh, D. Charan, N. Yoshioka, and T. Uakeia, “Livelihood Re-Establishment of Emigrants from Kiribati in Fiji,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.14, No.9, pp. 1277-1286, 2019.
Data files:
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Last updated on Dec. 01, 2020