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JDR

Journal of Disaster Research

ISSN : 1881-2473(Print) / 1883-8030(Online)
DOI : 10.20965/jdr.issn.1883-8030
Editors-in-Chief : Suminao Murakami (Laboratory of Urban Safety Planning)
Haruo Hayashi (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience)

Indexed in ESCI, Scopus, Compendex (Ei)

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2020-06-30T15:55:47+0000

Vol.10 (2015)

No.6

(Dec)

The First JDR Award
Mini Special Issue on Space Microbiology: Microbial Monitoring in the International Space Station – “Kibo”

The First JDR Award

: p. 1017
Congratulations! The First JDR Award
Dr. Murakami and Dr. Takiguchi
: p. 1018
Presenting the First JDR Award
Katsuki Takiguchi
: p. 1019
Message from the Winners
Fumio Yamazaki and Carlos Zavala

Mini Special Issue on Space Microbiology: Microbial Monitoring in the International Space Station – “Kibo”

: pp. 1022-1024
Microbes and Crewed Space Habitat
Abstract
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Nobuyasu Yamaguchi and Masao Nasu
: pp. 1025-1030
Microbial Observatory Research in the International Space Station and Japanese Experiment Module “Kibo”
Abstract
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Masaki Shirakawa, Fumiaki Tanigaki, and Takashi Yamazaki
: pp. 1031-1034
Significance of Changes in the Skin Fungal Microbiomes of Astronauts Staying on the International Space Station
Abstract
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Takashi Sugita and Otomi Cho
: pp. 1035-1039
Bacterial Monitoring in the International Space Station – “Kibo”
Abstract
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Tomoaki Ichijo, Nobuyasu Yamaguchi, and Masao Nasu

Regular Papers

: pp. 1041-1050
Disaster Warning System in the Philippines Through Enterprise Engineering Perspective: A Study on the 2013 Super Typhoon Haiyan
Abstract
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Natt Leelawat, Anawat Suppasri, Shuichi Kure, Carine J. Yi, Cherry May R. Mateo, and Fumihiko Imamura
: pp. 1051-1066
Organizational Structure and Institutions for Disaster Prevention: Research on the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in Kobe City
Abstract
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Masahiro Matsuyama, Reo Kimura, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 1067-1080
The 1755 Lisbon Tsunami at Vila do Bispo Municipality, Portugal
Abstract
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Angela Santos and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 1081-1090
A Distributed Autonomous Approach to Developing a Disaster Evacuation Assist System
Abstract
Yasuki Iizuka, Katsuya Kinoshita, and Kayo Iizuka
: pp. 1091-1098
Impacts of Business Continuity Management (BCM) on Automobile Parts Makers Against Natural Disaster Events
Abstract
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Abednico Lopang Montshiwa and Akio Nagahira
: pp. 1099-1109
Flood Inundation Analysis and Mitigation with a Coupled 1D-2D Hydraulic Model: A Case Study in Kochi, Japan
Abstract
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M. A. C. Niroshinie, Yasuo Nihei, Kazuaki Ohtsuki, and Shoji Okada
: pp. 1110-1116
Pricing Earthquake Catastrophe Options Based on the Mixed-Multinomial Tree Model
Abstract
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Feixing Wang and Xiaoling Gu
: pp. 1117-1125
Disaster Education for Elementary School Students Using Disaster Prevention Pocket Notebooks and Quizzes
Abstract
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Rui Nouchi, Shosuke Sato, and Fumihiko Imamura

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Creating Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society

Special Issue on Creating Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society

: pp. 791-793
Creating Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society
Takashi Furuya, Haruo Hayashi

The “risk society” has become a key 21st century theme due to the economic expansion and population explosion spurred by science and technology development during the 20th century. We must create societies resilient against risk to preserve well-being and continue sustainable development. Although the ideal would be to create a society free from disaster and crisis, resources are limited. To achieve a more resilient society using these resources, we must become wise enough to identify the risks threatening society and clarify how we are to prepare against them.

The traditional engineering approach is limited by its aim to reduce damage reduction as functional system of hazard, exposure, and vulnerability by focusing on mitigative action. We must instead add two factors – human activity and time dependency after a disaster – to make society more risk-resilient.

The Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX) of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) seeks to create new social, public, and economic value by solving obvious problems in society. In promoting science and technology R&D for society, RISTEX supports the building of networks enabling researchers and stakeholders to cooperate in solving societal problems. Our initiatives use R&D employing knowledge in the field of the humanities and social sciences, combined with natural sciences and technologies. Based on these existing accumulated knowledge and skills, scientifically verifying issues and lessons learned from these disasters, RISTEX launched a new R&D focus area, entitled “Creating a Community-Based Robust and Resilient Society,” in 2012. This R&D focus is to develop disaster risk reduction systems making society robust and resilient in the face of large-scale disasters.
(more…)

: pp. 794-806
Support for Farmland Restoration Through Mutual Assistance After Flood Disasters in Hilly and Mountainous Areas – Cases of the Cities of Yame and Ukiha Affected by the Torrential Rainfall in Northern Kyushu in July 2012 –
Abstract
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Kazuo Asahiro, Masakazu Tani, and Hiroyuki Kanekiyo
: pp. 807-817
A Study on Community-Based Reconstruction from Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster – A Case Study of Iwanuma City in Miyagi-Pref.
Abstract
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Mikiko Ishikawa
: pp. 818-829
Reconstruction of Coastal Villages Swept Away by Tsunami by 3D Digital Model
Abstract
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Akinobu Murakami, Eiko Kumakura, and Mikiko Ishikawa
: pp. 830-844
Computer-Assisted Databasing of Disaster Management Information Through Natural Language Processing
Abstract
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Kentaro Inui, Yotaro Watanabe, Kenshi Yamaguchi, Shingo Suzuki, Hiroko Koumoto, Naoko Kosaka, Akira Koyama, Tomohiro Kokogawa, and Yuji Maeda
: pp. 845-856
Study on an Online Communication and Task Management System for Disaster Response Utilizing Natural Language Processing
Abstract
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Shingo Suzuki, Kentaro Inui, Kenshi Yamaguchi, Hiroko Koumoto, Naoko Kosaka, Akira Koyama, and Yuji Maeda
: pp. 857-873
Proposal and Practice of Comprehensive Disaster Mitigation Depending on Communities in Preservation Districts for Traditional Buildings
Abstract
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Hajime Yokouchi
: pp. 874-886
Challenges for Safe and Secure Community Development in Traditional Architectures Preservation Districts – A Case Study on Tochigi District
Abstract
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Saori Kawazoe, Saikaku Toyokawa, Fumiko Imai, and Masaki Urano
: pp. 887-899
A Proposal of Multi-Scale Urban Disaster Mitigation Planning that Takes Regional Issues into Consideration
Abstract
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U Hiroi, Akito Murayama, Yoshihiro Chiba, Hisashi Komatsu, Masafumi Mori, Keiichi Yamada, Masato Yamazaki, and Nobuo Fukuwa
: pp. 900-918
Sustainable Training-Model Development Based on Analysis of Disaster Medicine Training
Abstract
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Shoichi Ohta, Munekazu Takeda, Ryo Sasaki, Hirotaka Uesugi, Hironobu Kamagata, Kentaro Kawai, Satomi Kuroshima, Michie Kawashima, Masaki Onishi, and Ikushi Yoda
: pp. 919-928
Critical Review of Japanese Disaster Medical Education for Citizens: Exploring the Method of Medutainment
Abstract
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Ikushi Yoda, Momo Shiroyama, Hirotaka Uesugi, Hironobu Kamagata, and Shoichi Ohta
: pp. 929-938
Disaster Prevention Activities of Japanese Fire Companies
Abstract
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Atsushi Sakuma, Ichiro Matsuo, Shin Ito, Shigeyoshi Tanaka, and Tsugio Nakaseko
: pp. 939-947
Optimal Life Recovery Assistance for Those Who Are Residing in Designated Temporary Housing in Widely Dispersed Locations: Interim Findings on Different Household Groups and on Life Recovery Promotion Parameters
Abstract
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Shigeo Tatsuki
: pp. 948-955
Grasp of Utilization of Social Networking Services in Restoration Process – Interview Survey for N City-Related Citizens of the Great East Japan Earthquake –
Abstract
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Shosuke Sato, Hiroko Koumoto, and Shigeo Tatsuki

Regular Papers

: pp. 957-965
Model of Tsunami Preparedness for Indonesian Tsunami Prone Areas Communities
Abstract
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Any Nurhayaty, Supra Wimbarti, Radianta Triatmadja, and Thomas D. Hastjarjo
: pp. 966-972
Analysis of Factors Triggering Shallow Failure and Deep-Seated Landslides Induced by Single Rainfall Events
Abstract
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Teng-To Yu, Ting-Shiuan Wang, and Youg-Sin Cheng
: pp. 973-980
Understanding Household Mobilization Time During Natech Accident Evacuation
Abstract
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Junlei Yu and Akihiko Hokugo
: pp. 981-990
A Case Study on Estimation of Business Interruption Losses to Industrial Sectors Due to Flood Disasters
Abstract
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Lijiao Yang, Hirokazu Tatano, Yoshio Kajitani, and Xinyu Jiang
: pp. 991-1000
Climate Change Impact on the Manageability of Floods and Droughts of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Basins Using Flood Duration Curves and Drought Duration Curves
Abstract
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Muhammad Masood and Kuniyoshi Takeuchi

No.sp

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part IV

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part IV

: p. 709
the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part IV
Katsuki Takiguchi

The basic policy of the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), as a multidisciplinary academicjournal, is to cover all types of disasters ? except for war ? through a broad comprehensive perspective. Since its inaugural issue in August 2006, the JDR has been published bimonthly,with six issues a year. 2015 marks the tenth year since the JDRfs first issue. Among the many events happening during this decade is the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster which was induced by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake.This event had two major features ? that the tsunami accompanying the earthquake caused the main damage and that it triggered a nuclear hazard accident at a nuclear power plant. The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster was a unprecedented earthquake disaster called catastrophic hazard following two others ? the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake Disasterthat leveled Tokyo and the 1995 Hanshin Awaji Earthquake Disaster that destroyed parts of Osaka and Kobe. In view of this catastrophic hazardfs scale, the JDR decided to publish special annual issues on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster for five years since 2012 in addition to its regularissues. No publication fee was charged to contributors and support was asked from corporations. Papers on the special issues are published mainly online as an e-journal though printed editions are published for archival purposes. The current issue is the fourth of these special issues, and contributors have covered the 2011 disaster from many a wide range of perspectives. 21 papers were submitted and 8 papers are accepted for publication after peer review. The editors are confident that, like the previous three issues, this issue fully measure up to the quality that was expected for the special issue. I wish to express my gratitude to the contributors and reviewers and to thank corporations for their invaluable support.

: pp. 711-715
Safety of Food Produced in Japan: Past and Present Status of Radioactive Contamination
Abstract
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Hideaki Karaki
: pp. 716-727
Public Health Concerns on Radiation Exposure After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident
Abstract
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Reiko Kanda, Satsuki Tsuji, Hidenori Yonehara, and Masami Torikoshi
: pp. 728-735
Initial Responses of the Government of Japan to the Great East Japan Earthquake (Earthquake and Tsunami) and Lessons Learned from Them
Abstract
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Akira Kotaki
: pp. 736-754
Research on Planning Process of Community Disaster Management Plan at Tsunami-Hit Area
Abstract
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Tadahiro Yoshikawa
: pp. 755-769
Issues Facing Voluntary Evacuees from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Based on the Collection and Analysis of Cases of Voluntary Evacuation
Abstract
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Kota Tomoyasu, Reo Kimura, Hitomi Mashima, and Ikuno Kazama
: pp. 770-776
Proposal for Robust Monitoring of Catastrophic Tsunami Using Onshore Strain and Tilt Geodetic Sensors
Abstract
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Hiroaki Takahashi
: pp. 777-782
Business Continuity Management (BCM) for Regional Financial Functionalities in Wide-Area Disasters
Importance and Challenges in Cooperation
Among Regional Financial Institutions and PPP (Public-Private Partnership)
Abstract
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Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 783-786
Application of Natural Disaster Information for Supply Chain Resilience
Abstract
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Takahiro Ono and Kenji Watanabe

No.4

(Aug)

Celebrating 10th anniversary
Special Issue on Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies

Celebrating 10th anniversary

: p. 575
Message from Editors-in-Chief
Suminao Murakami and Katsuki Takiguchi
: p. 576
Congratulatory Message
Takashi Onishi
: pp. 577-578
Congratulatory Message
Hongey Chen
: p. 579
Congratulatory Message
Pierre Y. Julien
: p. 580
Disseminating Knowledge for Reducing Disaster Damage
Nobuo Shuto
: pp. 581-582
Promoting Disaster Resilience Around the World
Kenneth C. Topping

Special Issue on Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies

: p. 583
Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies
Tomonori Kawano, Kazuya Uezu, and Takaaki Kato

It’s a great pleasure and honor to publish the special issue on “Fire and Disaster Prevention Technologies” in the Journal of Disaster Research. All of its 7 papers have been peerreviewed. We would like to extend our sincere thanks to the contributors and reviewers involved in producing these articles, especially to Dr. Masafumi Hosokawa, Chief, Planning for Community-Based Cooperation National Research Institute of Fire and Disaster, Fire and Disaster Management Agency Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications for his great support. The Research and Development center of Fire and Environmental Safety (RDFES) was established in April 2008 as a research institute within the Faculty of Environmental Engineering, the University of Kitakyushu. The RDFES is the first academic institute in Japan to contribute to environmental engineering and firefighting technology for social safety, and focuses on the environmental researches to overcome the worldwide serious firefighting problem, for example huge forest fires, and consequently contributes to create the epoch-making products for the environmental conservation and the safety of citizens. RDFES has become well known among firefighting professionals for its development of an “Environmentally friendly soap-based firefighting agent,” as well as new equipment that maximizes the effectiveness of the agent. This is just one example of successful collaboration between RDFES, the Kitakyushu City Fire and Disaster Management Department, a local soap company, and major firefighting enterprises in Japan. Today, RDFES is entering a new research area involving local communities and governments, which aims tomitigate and minimize the risk of fire and natural disasters. Researchers are engaged not only in the development of hardware but also in the creation of an organized social movement that could ensure more effective use of the hardware. We hope that the collaboration among industry, academia, and government will be more useful and powerful towards solving serious problems on “fire and environmental safety” through the mediation of this special issue. And reaching out to local communities reflects the center’s position to always welcome new partners to join our important and exciting research activities.

: pp. 584-585
Research and Development Efforts in Fire Safety and Disaster Preparedness
Abstract
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Masafumi Hosokawa
: pp. 586-594
Fire Protection Analysis and Potential Improvements for Wooden Cultural Heritage Sites in Japan
Abstract
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Kwang-Il Kim, Tadashi Konishi, Tomek Ziemba, Hirofumi Nonaka, Ki-Hun Nam, and Takeyoshi Tanaka
: pp. 595-603
A New Concept for Development of Quartz Crystal Microbalance Fire Prevention Sensors Modified with Nano-Assembled Thin Films
Abstract
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Seung-Woo Lee
: pp. 604-612
Learning from the Eco-Toxicology of Fire-Fighting Foams in Aquatic Organisms: Altered Eco-Toxicity of Sodium Alkyl Sulfonates on Green Paramecia and Medaka Fish Maintained in Different Waters
Abstract
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Kaishi Goto, Hiroshi Takaichi, and Tomonori Kawano
: pp. 613-619
Development of Firefighting Equipment for Efficient Firefighting Strategy (Development of New Hose)
Abstract
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Yoshiaki Miyazato, Takumi Sasaki, Masaki Sakaguchi, and Atsushi Nakamura
: pp. 620-626
Development of Firefighting Equipment for Efficient Firefighting Strategy (Development of New Nozzle)
Abstract
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Takumi Sasaki, Yoshiaki Miyazato, Junji Inamoto, Takahiro Yamamoto, and Atsushi Nakamura
: pp. 627-634
Investigating the Gap Between Actual and Perceived Distance from a Nuclear Power Plant: A Case Study in Japan
Abstract
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Takaaki Kato, Shogo Takahara, and Toshimitsu Homma
: pp. 635-640
The Rise and Fall of the Kobe Economy from the 1995 Earthquake
Abstract
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Yasuhide Okuyama

Regular Papers

: pp. 641-646
Compared Modeling Study of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking at Dissimilar Weld of Alloy 182 of Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor According to Hydrogen Concentration
Abstract
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Omar F. Aly, Miguel M. Neto, Mônica M. A. M. Schvartzman, and Luciana I. L. Lima
: pp. 647-654
Performance Evaluation of Base-Isolated Structures
Abstract
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Sarun Chimamphant and Kazuhiko Kasai
: pp. 655-666
Analysis of Radio Wave Propagation in an Urban Environment and its Application to Initial Disaster Response Support
Abstract
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Youhei Kawamura, Hyongdoo Jang, Markus Wagner, Hajime Nobuhara, Ashraf M. Dewan, Bert Veenendaal, and Itaru Kitahara
: pp. 667-677
Ground Motion Estimation Using Front Site Wave Form Data Based on RVM for Earthquake Early Warning
Abstract
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Yincheng Yang and Masato Motosaka
: pp. 678-686
Hazard Perception and Anchoring: A Comparison of the Three Models Explaining the Anchoring Effect
Abstract
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Kazuhisa Nagaya and Kazuya Nakayachi
: pp. 687-692
Voluntary Isolation After the Disaster: The Loss of Community and Family in the Super Aged Society in Japan
Abstract
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Kanako Sasaki and Miyako Sakurai

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Adaptation Measures for Disasters due to Climate Change

Special Issue on Adaptation Measures for Disasters due to Climate Change

: pp. 403-402
Adaptation Measures for Disasters due to Climate Change
Toshimitsu Komatsu

An increase in natural hazards due to global warming has broadened the gap between natural hazards and disaster prevention. This gap has raised the possibility that unexpected major disasters occur. As chances of a natural hazard grow, appropriate and efficient adaptation is considered as a last resort for lessening disaster. In water-related disasters such as floods and debris flows, individual disaster sites have specific thresholds (limits). When a natural hazard exceeds this threshold, a serious disaster strikes us. On the contrary when it is under the limit, disaster damage is kept to be small. Flood disasters and landslides have the side of gall or nothing.h This is a characteristic of water-related disasters. Climate change is causing natural hazards to exceed this threshold easily. This makes resilient proactive adaptation very important in disaster prevention. Specific adaptation measures developed hereafter must cope with serious water and sediment disasters throughout mountainous regions, rivers, urban areas, and coastal areas that are assumed to be influenced by global warming. The Journal of Disaster Research has planned a special issue on the adaptation measures for disasters due to climate change. Having taken part in field surveys, computer simulations, and laboratory experiments and finding adaptation measures worth studying more deeply, I decided to contribute to this special issue as a Guest Editor. All of its 11 papers have been peer-reviewed. The broad topics covered range from floods, landslides, and storm surges to adaptation to the human being society. I would like to extend my sincere thanks to the contributors and reviewers involved in producing these articles, especially to Dr. Hideo Oshikawa, Assistant Professor of the Department of Urban and Environment Engineering, Kyushu University, Japan, for his great support. I look forward with great anticipation to feedback from readers regarding these articles.

: pp. 404-419
Challenges of Implementing Climate Change Adaptation Policy for Disaster Risk Reduction – Implications from Framing Gap Among Stakeholders and the General Public –
Abstract
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Kenshi Baba and Mitsuru Tanaka
: pp. 420-428
Analysis of Ideal Directions of Climate Change Adaptation and Problems in Implementing Them for Local Japanese Governments
Abstract
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Nobuo Shirai and Mitsuru Tanaka
: pp. 429-435
Meteorological Characteristics of Local Heavy Rainfall in the Fukuoka Plain
Abstract
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Yukiko Hisada, Yuji Sugihara, and Nobuhiro Matsunaga
: pp. 436-447
Numerical Experiments on Spatially Averaged Precipitation in Heavy Rainfall Event Using the WRF Model
Abstract
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Yuji Sugihara, Sho Imagama, Nobuhiro Matsunaga, and Yukiko Hisada
: pp. 448-456
Bias Correction in Typhoon and Storm Surge Projection Considering Characteristics of Global Climate Model MRI-AGCM3.2S
Abstract
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Noriaki Hashimoto, Yukihiro Kinashi, Tomoko Kawashima, Masaki Yokota, Masaru Yamashiro, and Mitsuyoshi Kodama
: pp. 457-466
Evaluation of Inhibitory Effect by Adaptation Measures for Red Soil Runoff from Farmland due to Heavy Rainfall
Abstract
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Noriyuki Yasufuku, Kohei Araki, Kiyoshi Omine, Kenichiro Okumura, and Kohei Iwami
: pp. 467-474
An Experimental Study on Flood Control Capability of Dry Dams Constructed in a Series
Abstract
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Hideo Oshikawa, Yuka Mito, and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 475-485
Flood Control Mechanism of Multiple Dams Constructed in a Series Based on Cascade Method
Abstract
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Hideo Oshikawa and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 486-494
Growth of Mangrove Forests and the Influence on Flood Disaster at Amami Oshima Island, Japan
Abstract
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Akira Tai, Akihiro Hashimoto, Takuya Oba, Kazuki Kawai, Kazuaki Otsuki, Hiromitsu Nagasaka, and Tomonori Saita
: pp. 495-502
Clarification and Application of Inundation Processes in Basins with Insufficient Observation Devices Installed
Abstract
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Akihiro Hashimoto, Akira Tai, and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 503-511
Compound Strategy Forward to Compound Disaster Mitigation: Lessons from Hsiaolin Village, Typhoon Morakot 2009
Abstract
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Wen-Chi Lai, Yuan-Jung Tsai, and Chjeng-Lun Shieh

Regular Papers

: pp. 513-526
Applying Risk Analysis to the Disaster Impact of Extreme Typhoon Events Under Climate Change
Abstract
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Hsin-Chi Li, Shiao-Ping Wei, Chao-Tzuen Cheng, Jun-Jih Liou, Yung-Ming Chen, and Keh-Chia Yeh
: pp. 527-534
Finite Element Reliability Analysis of Steel Containment Vessels with Corrosion Damage
Abstract
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Xiaolei Wang and Dagang Lu
: pp. 535-550
Development of Science-Based Decision Support System for Evaluating the Safety of Evacuation Facilities in Case of Torrential Rains
Abstract
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Hidetomo Miyake, Haruo Hayashi, Shingo Suzuki, and Takahiro Nishino
: pp. 551-557
Brief Report of Shaking Table Test on Masonry Building Strengthened with Ferrocement Layers
Abstract
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Teddy Boen, Hiroshi Imai, Febrin Ismail, Toshikazu Hanazato, and Lenny

No.2

(Apr)

Selected Papers from TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata
Abstracts of presentations at TIEMS 2014

Selected Papers from TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata

: pp. 187-188
Selected Papers from TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata
Keiko Tamura and Haruo Hayashi

TIEMS – The International Emergency Society founded in 1993 – is a global forum for education, training, certification and policy in emergency and disaster management. TIEMS is dedicated to developing a safer world by bringing the benefits of modern emergency management tools, techniques and good industry practice. The Japan Chapter of TIEMS was established in 2011 when Japan members agreed on the great worth of the Society’s mission.

The Japan Chapter organized the Oct. 20-23, 2014, TIEMS Annual Conference in Niigata. Niigata was chosen because the year 2014 had a special meaning in the history of disasters in Japan. That is, the memorials of four major disasters had memorial anniversaries in that year – the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Niigata Earthquake, the 40th anniversary of the 1974 Niigata Yakeyama Volcano eruption, and the 10th anniversaries of the 2004 Niigata-Fukushima flood and Niigata-Chuetsu earthquake. The event brought over 1,000 domestic and international participants together to discuss risk management and resilience against disasters. The event also provided many opportunities for participants to share their scientific knowledge learn about the lessons from past experience of practitioners in the disaster management field and view the industry exhibition emerging to a wide variety of experience in disaster response.

With so many experts and practitioners willing to make presentations at the Conference, the JDR has brought together selected 17 papers and other output from them. My colleagues and I am honored to make these TIEMS 2014 achievements known to the broadest possible audience, and we are assured that this will create many fruitful outcomes for our reading audience.

: pp. 189-195
Developing a Web-Based Platform to Share Disaster Risk Reduction Technology
Abstract
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Young-Jai Lee
: pp. 196-203
Comparison Between the Life Recovery Processes After the Mid-Niigata Earthquake and the Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake – Results of a Random Sampled Social Survey Using the Life Recovery Calendar and GIS-Based Spatiotemporal Analysis
Abstract
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Reo Kimura, Munenari Inoguchi, Keiko Tamura, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 204-209
Area Business Continuity Management, A New Approach to Sustainable Local Economy
Abstract
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H. Baba, T. Watanabe, K. Miyata, and H. Matsumoto
: pp. 210-216
Attempt to Typify Disaster Educational Programs – Case Study of the Disaster Management Education Challenge Plan
Abstract
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Kota Tomoyasu, Reo Kimura, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 217-224
Development of Web-Based Tabletop Emergency Earthquake Exercise System
Abstract
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Bojia Zhou, Gang Sun, Xiaoyong Zhang, Jianhua Xu, Junyan Lai, Xiaoxia Du, Masafumi Hosokawa, Haruo Hayashi, Reo Kimura, and Yukihisa Sakurada
: pp. 225-230
Integration of GIS with Remote Sensing and GPS for Disaster Mitigation
Abstract
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Sikander Nawaz Khan
: pp. 231-237
Dynamic Simulation Research of Overburden Strata Failure Characteristics and Stress Dependence of Metal Mine
Abstract
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Kang Zhao, Zhongqun Guo, and Youzhi Zhang
: pp. 238-245
Current Issues Regarding the Incident Command System in the Philippines
Abstract
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Miho Ohara and Hisaya Sawano
: pp. 246-251
Manage Everything or Anything? Possible Ways Towards Generic Emergency Management Capabilities
Abstract
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Jonas Borell
: pp. 252-262
A Study on the Practical Ways of Implementing a Street-Wide BCP Exercise in the Banking Industry
Abstract
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Yasutake Sayanagi and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 263-269
Development of NERSS Training Program for Earthquake Emergency Response Capacity Building of Local Governments
Abstract
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Junyan Lai, Lu Ding, Yuan Zhang, Weimin Wu, Haruo Hayashi, Reo Kimura, Masafumi Hosokawa, and Yukihisa Sakurada
: pp. 270-275
Blackout 2014 Exercise – Prague, the Capital of the Czech Republic
Abstract
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Tomas Hudecek, Josef Juránek, and Jaroslav Pejcoch
: pp. 276-287
Comparative Analysis of Earthquake Emergency Response in China and Japan Based on Timeline: 311 Earthquake vs 512 Earthquake
Abstract
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Xiaoxia Du, Jun Zhang, Jianhua Xu, Zhuan He, Junyan Lai, Yigang Li, Reo Kimura, Haruo Hayashi, Masafumi Hosokawa, and Yukihisa Sakurada
: pp. 288-298
Local People’s Responses to Flood Disasters in Flood Prone Areas of Northeast Bangladesh
Abstract
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Naoki Yamashita and Terunori Ohmoto
: pp. 299-307
Current Relocation Practices Targeting Disaster Prone Communities in Developing Countries: Case Study San Francisco Libre, Nicaragua
Abstract
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Judith Cuadra, Janet Dilling, Ralph Brower, and Malaika Samples
: pp. 308-318
Understanding Flood Risks for Better Planning and Resilience: Novel Stochastic Models and Methods for South-East Asia
Abstract
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Julien Oliver, Ole Larsen, Mads Rasmussen, Erickson Lanuza, and Avinash Chakravarthy
: pp. 319-325
The Resilient Smart City (An Proposal)
Abstract
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Yukio Fujinawa, Ryoichi Kouda, and Yoichi Noda

Abstracts of presentations at TIEMS 2014

: pp. 327-362
Abstracts of presentations at TIEMS 2014 Annual Conference
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Regular Papers

: pp. 363-372
Cross-Organizational Information Sharing and Coordination in Disaster Response: The Case of the 2008 Wenchuan China Earthquake
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Enyan Wang, Dequan Zheng, and Xiangyang Li
: pp. 373-385
Improvement of Reception and Transmission Performance on Early Warning System for Multi Country with QZSS Augmentation Signal
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Daisuke Iwaizumi, Shota Iino, Hiroki Satoh, Mitsuaki Takaishi, Naoki Iso, and Naohiko Kohtake

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines

: pp. 5-7
Enhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines
Hiroshi Inoue and Renato U. Solidum, Jr.

This special issue of JDR features 18 papers and reports on an international 2010 to 2015 cooperative project entitled gEnhancement of Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring and Effective Utilization of Disaster Mitigation Information in the Philippines.h This project is being conducted under the SATREPS program (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development), cosponsored by the JST (Japan Science and Technology Agency) and JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency).

The Philippines is one of the worldfs most earthquake and volcano disaster-prone countries because it is located along the active boundary between the Philippine Sea Plate and Eurasian Plate. Collisions by the two plates generate plate subductions and crustal stress that generates earthquakes and volcanic activities on the archipelago.

The Philippines has experienced numerous disastrous earthquakes, the most recent being the 1990 M7.8 Luzon earthquake, which killed over 1,000 local residents. A damaging earthquake also occurred during this 5-year project, in October 2013, on Bohol Island, causing about 200 deaths when houses and other buildings collapsed.

Volcanoes are another major killer in the Philippines. The largest in the last century was when the Taal volcano erupted in 1911, killing 1,300 by a base surge. The 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption is known as the largest volcanic event in the 20th century. The Mayon volcano is also known to be a beautiful but dangerous volcano that frequently erupts, causing lahars ? steaming moving fluid masses of volcanic debris and water ? that damaged villages at the foot of the mountain.

The PHIVOLCS (Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology), a governmental agency mandated to monitor earthquakes and volcanoes, provides earthquake and volcano information and alerts to the public. It also conducts research on the mechanisms behind such natural phenomena and on evaluating such hazards and risks. The PHIVOLCSfs other mission is educating people and society on being prepared for disasters. Earthquake and volcano bulletins and alerts, research output, and educational materials and training provided by PHIVOLCS have enriched knowledge and enhanced measures against disaster.
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: pp. 8-17
Performance of Broadband Seismic Network of the Philippines
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Arnaldo A. Melosantos, Karl Vincent C. Soriano, Ponzch Colleen M. Alcones, Jose U. Pantig, Jun D. Bonita, Ishmael C. Narag, Hiroyuki Kumagai, and Hiroshi Inoue
: pp. 18-24
Regional Moment Tensor Analysis in the Philippines: CMT Solutions in 2012–2013
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Jun D. Bonita, Hiroyuki Kumagai, and Masaru Nakano
: pp. 25-34
Development and Operation of a Regional Moment Tensor Analysis System in the Philippines: Contributions to the Understanding of Recent Damaging Earthquakes
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Baby Jane T. Punongbayan, Hiroyuki Kumagai, Nelson Pulido, Jun D. Bonita, Masaru Nakano, Tadashi Yamashina, Yuta Maeda, Hiroshi Inoue, Arnaldo A. Melosantos, Melquiades F. Figueroa, Ponczh Colleen M. Alcones, Karl Vincent C. Soriano, Ishmael C. Narag, and Renato U. Solidum, Jr.
: pp. 35-42
Development of Seismic Intensity Meter for the Philippines
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Hiroshi Inoue, Zhengying Fan, Melchor Lasala, Robert Tiglao, Bartolome Bautista, Debbie Rivera, and Ishmael Narag
: pp. 43-50
Establishment of Earthquake Intensity Meter Network in the Philippines
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Melchor Lasala, Hiroshi Inoue, Roberto Tiglao, Zhengying Fan, Bartolome Bautista, and Ishmael Narag
: pp. 51-58
Building a Tsunami Simulation Database for the Tsunami Warning System in the Philippines
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Yohko Igarashi, Toshihiro Ueno, Kenji Nakata, Vilma C. Hernandez-Grennan, Joan L. Cruz-Salcedo, Ishmael C. Narag, Bartolome C. Bautista, and Takeshi Koizumi
: pp. 59-66
Plate Convergence and Block Motions in Mindanao Island, Philippine as Derived from Campaign GPS Observations
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Takahiro Ohkura, Takao Tabei, Fumiaki Kimata, Teresito C. Bacolcol, Yasuhiko Nakamura, Artemio C. Luis, Jr., Alfie Pelicano, Robinson Jorgio, Milo Tabigue, Magdalino Abrahan, Eleazar Jorgio, and Endra Gunawan
: pp. 67-73
Continuous GPS Observations on Mindanao
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Mikio Tobita, Hisashi Suito, Tomokazu Kobayashi, Satoshi Kawamoto, Masayuki Yamanaka, Akira Suzuki, Toshiharu Enya, Masaki Honda, Tetsuro Imakiire, Artemio Luis, Alfie Pelicano, Teresito Bacolcol, and Takahiro Ohkura
: pp. 74-82
Fault Distribution, Segmentation and Earthquake Generation Potential of the Philippine Fault in Eastern Mindanao, Philippines
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Jeffrey S. Perez, Hiroyuki Tsutsumi, Mabelline T. Cahulogan, Desiderio P. Cabanlit, Ma. Isabel T. Abigania, and Takashi Nakata
: pp. 83-90
Coseismic Displacement and Recurrence Interval of the 1973 Ragay Gulf Earthquake, Southern Luzon, Philippines
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Hiroyuki Tsutsumi, Jeffrey S. Perez, Jaime U. Marjes, Kathleen L. Papiona, and Noelynna T. Ramos
: pp. 91-98
Geometry and Structure of the Philippine Fault in Ragay Gulf, Southern Luzon
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Hirotake Yasuda, Teresito Bacolcol, Arturo Daag, Ericson Bariso, Emmanuelle Mitiam, Jaime Marjes, and Takashi Nakata
: pp. 99-105
Electromagnetic Observations at Taal Volcano
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Paul Karson Alanis, Yoichi Sasai, and Toshiyasu Nagao
: pp. 106-112
Ground Deformation of Mayon Volcano Revealed by GPS Campaign Survey
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Akimichi Takagi, Kenji Fujiwara, Takahiro Ohkura, Artemio C. Luis, Jr., Alejo V. Baloloy, Shinobu Ando, Eduardo Laguerta, and Ma. Antonia V. Bornas
: pp. 113-120
A Full-Scale Shaking Table Test on Philippine Concrete Hollow Blocks (CHB) Masonry Houses
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Hiroshi Imai, Chikahiro Minowa, Angelito G. Lanuza, Henremagne C. Penarubia, Ishmael C. Narag, Renato U. Soridum, Jr., Kenji Okazaki, Tatsuo Narafu, Toshikazu Hanazato, and Hiroshi Inoue
: pp. 121-128
Development of Practical Tools for Vulnerability and Safety Evaluation of Houses in the Philippines
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Hiroshi Imai, Akitoshi Nishimura, Angelito G. Lanuza, Henremagne C. Penarubia, Ronald S. Ison, Miriam L. Tamayo, Ishmael C. Narag, Renato U. Soridum, Jr., Hiroshi Inoue, Junzo Sakuma, and Kenji Okazaki
: pp. 129-134
Strategy for Dissemination of Practical Tools for Evaluation of Vulnerability and Safety of Houses in the Philippines
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Joan L. Cruz-Salcedo, Ma. Mylene L. Martinez-Villegas, Ester B. Garrido, Angelito G. Lanuza, Hiroshi Imai, Henremagne C. Penarubia, Hiroshi Inoue, and Renato U. Solidum, Jr.
: pp. 135-144
Filipinos in Japan: Narratives of Experience from the March 11, 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
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Ma. Mylene Martinez-Villegas, Renato U. Solidum, Jr., Hiroshi Inoue, Hiroshi Imai, Angelito G. Lanuza, Henremagne C. Penarubia, Melcario Pagtalunan, Ma. Lynn P. Melosantos, Joan L. Cruz-Salcedo, Ishmael C. Narag, Melchor Lasala, Ma. Antonia V. Bornas, Perla J. Delos Reyes, and Bartolome Bautista
: pp. 145-149
Developing Manga-Style Tsunami Information Materials Based on the March 11, 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake
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Ma. Mylene Martinez-Villegas, Lucille Rose Del Monte, Renato U. Solidum, Jr., John Paul Fallarme, Monique Realis, Melcario Pagtalunan, and Eumelia Belo

Regular Papers

: pp. 151-162
Analysis of the Banks’ Initial Reactions with the 9/11 and 3/11
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Yasutake Sayanagi and Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 163-170
Organizational Promoting Factors for SME BCP (2)
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Shinichi Okabe and Akio Nagahira

Vol.9 (2014)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru (II)

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru (II)

: p. 915
Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru (II)
Fumio Yamazaki, Carlos Zavala, and Miguel Estrada

With the greatest pleasure, we present the second special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), entitled Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru. This follows the first special issue on the same theme. These special issues contain 36 articles, 15 in the first and 21 in the second. They summarize research output from the SATREPS Peru project. SATREPS is an international research program sponsored by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). As a SATREPS project on natural disaster mitigation, our 5-year Peru project began in March 2010 with the purpose of enhancing and implementing earthquake and tsunami disaster-mitigation technology in Peru.

The joint research project provides good opportunities for Peruvian and Japanese researchers and engineers to work together exchanging opinions on their common goal of reducing loss from earthquakes and tsunamis. Within the project period, CISMID was designated as a government agency in charge of disaster-mitigation activities. Project outcomes have been introduced in national design codes and in guidelines on earthquake and tsunami risk evaluation in Peru. Our project has drawn great attention among members of Peruvian society. It has attracted hundreds of participants and scores of mass media through public seminars and symposia. We expect the project to be sustained through public awareness and dissemination activities by Peruvian organizations.

We hope this special issue will provide useful information to seismic-prone Asia-Pacific countries, especially Latin America. In closing, we sincerely thank the contributors and reviewers who have done so much to make the articles in this special issue both interesting and valuable.

: pp. 916-924
Summary Report of the SATREPS Project on Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru
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Fumio Yamazaki, Carlos Zavala, Shoichi Nakai, Shunichi Koshimura, Taiki Saito, Saburoh Midorikawa, Zenon Aguilar, Miguel Estrada, and Alberto Bisbal
: pp. 925-930
Estimation of a Source Model and Strong Motion Simulation for Tacna City, South Peru
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Nelson Pulido, Shoichi Nakai, Hiroaki Yamanaka, Diana Calderon, Zenon Aguilar, and Toru Sekiguchi
: pp. 931-938
Estimation of S-Wave Velocity Profiles at Lima City, Peru Using Microtremor Arrays
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Selene Quispe, Kosuke Chimoto, Hiroaki Yamanaka, Hernando Tavera, Fernando Lazares, and Zenon Aguilar
: pp. 939-945
Development of a Seismic Microzoning Map for Lima City and Callao, Peru
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Diana Calderon, Zenon Aguilar, Fernando Lazares, Silvia Alarcon, and Selene Quispe
: pp. 946-953
Analysis of Topographic Effects in Dynamic Response of a Typical Rocky Populated Slope in Lima, Peru
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Carlos Gonzales, Shoichi Nakai, Toru Sekiguchi, Diana Calderon, Zenon Aguilar, and Fernando Lazares
: pp. 954-960
Tsunami Waveform Inversion of the 2007 Peru (Mw8.1) Earthquake
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Cesar Jimenez, Nabilt Moggiano, Erick Mas, Bruno Adriano, Yushiro Fujii, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 961-967
Simulation of Tsunami Inundation in Central Peru from Future Megathrust Earthquake Scenarios
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Erick Mas, Bruno Adriano, Nelson Pulido, Cesar Jimenez, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 968-975
Scenarios of Earthquake and Tsunami Damage Probability in Callao Region, Peru Using Tsunami Fragility Functions
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Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, Shunichi Koshimura, Miguel Estrada, and Cesar Jimenez
: pp. 976-983
Evaluation of Tsunami Wave Loads Acting on Walls of Confined-Masonry-Brick and Concrete-Block Houses
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Gaku Shoji, Hirofumi Shimizu, Shunichi Koshimura, Miguel Estrada, and Cesar Jimenez
: pp. 984-992
Strength and Deformation of Confined Brick Masonry Walls Subjected to Lateral Forces – Review of Existing Test Data in Japan and Peru –
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Shunsuke Sugano, Taiki Saito, Carlos Zavala, and Lourdes Cardenas
: pp. 993-1000
Implementation of Database of Masonry Walls Test – Review of Existing Test Data in Peru
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Lourdes Cardenas, Roy Reyna, Lucio Estacio, and Carlos Zavala
: pp. 1001-1007
Implementation of Building Monitoring Network in Peru Under SATREPS Project
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Miguel Diaz, Patricia Gibu, Lucio Estacio, and Ricardo Proano
: pp. 1008-1014
Basic Study on Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls Without Boundary Columns Retrofitted by Carbon Fiber Sheets
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Tomoya Matsui, Taiki Saito, and Roy Reyna
: pp. 1015-1020
Current State of Masonry Properties Material on Emerging Zones in Lima City
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Luis Lavado, Jenny Taira, and Jorge Gallardo
: pp. 1021-1025
Comparison of Behaviors of Non-Engineered Masonry Tubular Block Walls and Solid Engineered Walls
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Carlos Zavala, Luis Lavado, Jenny Taira, Lourdes Cardenas, and Miguel Diaz
: pp. 1026-1031
Assessment of Seismic Performance of High-Rise Thin RC Wall Buildings in Lima, Peru Using Fragility Functions
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Luis G. Quiroz and Yoshihisa Maruyama
: pp. 1032-1041
Development of Building Inventory Data and Earthquake Damage Estimation in Lima, Peru for Future Earthquakes
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Masashi Matsuoka, Shun Mito, Saburoh Midorikawa, Hiroyuki Miura, Luis G. Quiroz, Yoshihisa Maruyama, and Miguel Estrada
: pp. 1042-1049
Development of Building Height Data in Peru from High-Resolution SAR Imagery
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Wen Liu, Fumio Yamazaki, Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 1050-1058
Evaluation of Seismic Vulnerability of Buildings Based on Damage Survey Data from the 2007 Pisco, Peru Earthquake
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Shizuko Matsuzaki, Nelson Pulido, Yoshihisa Maruyama, Miguel Estrada, Carlos Zavala, and Fumio Yamazaki
: pp. 1059-1068
Post-Disaster Urban Recovery Monitoring in Pisco After the 2007 Peru Earthquake Using Satellite Image
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Tomoyo Hoshi, Osamu Murao, Kunihiko Yoshino, Fumio Yamazaki, and Miguel Estrada
: pp. 1069-1077
A Simulation Model for Forecasting Urban Vulnerability to Earthquake Disasters in Lima, Peru: “LIMA-UVEQ”
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Hideki Kaji, Osamu Murao, Masaki Fujioka, Hidehiko Kanegae, Fumio Yamazaki, Miguel Estrada, and Alberto Bisbal

Regular Papers

: pp. 1079-1087
Beneficial Effects of Learning with Game-Book on Education for Disaster Prevention in Children
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Rui Nouchi and Motoaki Sugiura
: pp. 1088-1100
Flood Disaster in the Yura River in 2004 and 2013
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Shigeru Kawai and Kazuo Ashida

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on J-GRID (Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Disease)

Special Issue on J-GRID (Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Disease)

: pp. 765-767
J-GRID (Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Disease)
Sumio Shinoda

In the developed countries including Japan, malignant tumor (cancer), heart disease and cerebral apoplexy are major causes of death, but infectious diseases still responsible for high mortality in the developing countries, especially for children less than 5 years of age. World Health Statistics published byWHO indicates a high percentage of mortality from infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, diarrhea, measles, malaria and pneumonia in children of South and Southeast Asian and African countries (World Health Statistics 2014,World Health Organization). Many of these infectious diseases have the potential for borderless transmission and invasion to Japan.

Given this situation, Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) introduced Phase I of a program “Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases,” running from fiscal 2005 to 2009 and involving 8 Japanese universities and 2 Japanese research centers. The program was established to:

1) Create of a domestic research structure to promote the accumulation of fundamental knowledge about infectious diseases,

2) Set up 13 overseas research collaboration centers in 8 countries at high risk of emerging and reemerging infections, Japanese researchers are stationed at these centers, where they conduct research in partnership with overseas instructors,

3) Develop a network among domestic and overseas research centers,

4) Develop human resources.

The program, supervised by MEXT, and managed by the RIKEN Center of the Research Network for Infectious Diseases (Riken CRNID). Dr. Yoshiyuki Nagai, Program Director (PD), heads CRNID and is organizing the program.

Phase II of the program was set up as the Japan Initiative for the Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) and was established for fiscal 2010-2014.
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: pp. 768-773
About the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) – An Overview
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Yoshiyuki Nagai
: pp. 774-783
Activity of Collaborative Research Center of Okayama University for Infectious Disease in India
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Sumio Shinoda, Daisuke Imamura, Tamaki Mizuno, and Shin-ichi Miyoshi
: pp. 784-792
Japan-Thailand Collaboration Research on Infectious Diseases: Promotion and Hurdles
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Shigeyuki Hamada, Naokazu Takeda, and Taroh Kinoshita
: pp. 793-800
Collaboration with China
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Aikichi Iwamoto, Zene Matsuda, Yoshihiro Kitamura, Takaomi Ishida, Kiyoko Iwatsuki-Horimoto, and Yoshihiro Kawaoka
: pp. 801-806
The Outline of the “Collaborative Study on Emerging and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases in Vietnam, Enhancement of Research Capacity”
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Tetsu Yamashiro
: pp. 807-812
Kenya Research Station and its Research Activities
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Yoshio Ichinose
: pp. 813-817
Joint Research Project on Infectious Diseases in West-African Subregion
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Eiji Ido, Takashi Suzuki, William K. Ampofo, Irene Ayi, Shoji Yamaoka, Kwadwo A. Koram, and Nobuo Ohta
: pp. 818-822
Research Activities of Hokudai Center for Zoonosis Control in Zambia
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Hideaki Higashi and Hiroshi Kida
: pp. 823-827
Research Activities and Responding to Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda): Tohoku-RITM Collaborating Research Center in the Philippines
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Mariko Saito, Mayuko Saito, Tadatsugu Imamura, Taro Kamigaki, Socorro P. Lupisan, and Hitoshi Oshitani
: pp. 828-835
Indonesia-Kobe University Collaborative Research Center for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases (CRC-ERID) J-GRID (Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases)
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Toshiro Shirakawa, Kazufumi Shimizu, Takako Utsumi, Masanori Kameoka, Hak Hotta, and Yoshitake Hayashi
: pp. 836-838
Efforts Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria and Bacteremia in Vietnam
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Nozomi Takeshita, Norio Ohmagari, Teruo Kirikae, and Shinichi Oka
: pp. 839-841
Swine Influenza Surveillance in the Southeast Asia
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Takehiko Saito, Nobuhiro Takemae, Haruka Abe, and Yuko Uchida
: pp. 842-847
Influenza Project in Myanmar
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Reiko Saito, Yadanar Kyaw, Yi Yi Myint, Clyde Dapat,Go Hasegawa, and Makoto Naito

Regular Papers

: pp. 849-857
Organizational Promoting Factors for SME BCP
Abstract
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Shinichi Okabe and Akio Nagahira
: pp. 858-869
Fundamental Analysis for Flood Risk Management in the Selected River Basins of Southeast Asia
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Badri Bhakta Shrestha, Toshio Okazumi, Mamoru Miyamoto, Seishi Nabesaka, Shigenobu Tanaka, and Ai Sugiura
: pp. 870-878
Educational Merits of Lecturing and Discussion Methods in Teaching Disaster Prevention: Toward Improvement of Students’ Knowledge, Attitude, and Behavior in Merapi Volcano Area Primary Schools
Abstract
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Tuswadi and Takehiro Hayashi
: pp. 879-886
Lessons Learnt from Communication for Disaster Preparedness: A Study on Six Survivors from the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami 2011
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Md. Faiz Shah and Parves Sultan
: pp. 887-900
A Quantitative Estimate of Vulnerable People and Evaluation of Flood Evacuation Policy
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Karina Vink, Kuniyoshi Takeuchi, and Kelly M. Kibler

No.sp

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part III – Risk Communication –

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part III – Risk Communication –

: p. 589
the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part III – Risk Communication –
Hideaki Karaki

Following its two special issues on the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster, the Journal of Disaster Research is now publishing this third issue focusing on risk communication.

The earthquake and tsunami killed over 20,000 people, destroyed houses, farmlands, and communities, and led to a large amount of radioactive materials being released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. These materials contaminated the environment and foods and forced almost 160,000 people to be evacuated from the highly contaminated district.

Ruined buildings are now being reconstructed and adversely affected farmland is being decontaminated. The victims remained concerned, however, about their future, especially those exposed to even very low-level radiation.

Chernobyl’s Legacy: Health, Environmental and Socio-Economic Impacts, a landmark report released by the Chernobyl Forum in 2005, assessed the 20-year impact of the nuclear explosion at the Chernobyl power plant in 1986. One of its important findings was that 4,000 cases of thyroid cancer, mainly in children, had occurred but that except for nine deaths, all of the children recovered and that there was no evidence of any increase in the incidence of leukemia or cancer among affected residents.
Such facts as these are not generally known, however, many health conditions have been erroneously attributed to radiation exposure and myths and misperceptions have persisted about the threat of radiation, resulting in a “paralyzing fatalism” among residents of affected areas.

The Chernobyl report recommends developing new and innovative ways of risk communication to increase knowledge about the actual health effects of radiation and providing accurate information on the incident’s physical and mental health consequences.

Over the last three years, experts in risk communication in Japan have continued working to disseminate scientifically accurate information about radiation. This issue discusses the current status and questions related to the incident.

: pp. 592-597
Short History of Risk Communication in Japan
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Tomio Kinoshita
: pp. 598-602
Risk Communication in the Food Field
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Hideaki Karaki
: pp. 603-607
Risk Communication in Chemical Sector in Connection to the Role of Risk Assessment
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Akihiro Tokai and Naoya Kojima
: pp. 608-618
Risk Communication in the Field of Radiation
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Reiko Kanda
: pp. 619-627
Risk Communication in Japan Concerning Future of Nuclear Technology
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Masaharu Kitamura
: pp. 628-637
Interdisciplinary Framework of Risk Communication as an Integral Part of Environmental Risk Analysis in Postindustrial Risk Society: Three Case Studies of the 1999 Amendment of Air Pollution Control Law, Dioxins, and the EMF Risks
Abstract
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Saburo Ikeda
: pp. 638-643
Toward Mitigating Actions: Risk Communication Regarding Natural Disaster
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Kazuya Nakayachi
: pp. 644-652
Verbal Expressions of Risk Communication: A Case Study After the 3.11 Crisis
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Shinichiro Okamoto and Toshiko Kikkawa
: pp. 653-664
An Analysis of International Assistance Based on Lessons from the Great East Japan Earthquake
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Atsushi Koresawa
: pp. 665-672
Disaster Experience and Participatory Energy Governance in Post-Disaster Japan: A Survey of Citizen Willingness to Participate in Nuclear and Energy Deliberations
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Hidenori Nakamura
: pp. 673-689
Current Status and Issues of Life Recovery Process Three Years After the Great East Japan Earthquake Questionnaire Based on Subjective Estimate of Victims Using Life Recovery Calendar Method
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Reo Kimura, Kota Tomoyasu, Yutaka Yajima, Hitomi Mashima, Kensaku Furukawa, Yuki Toda, Kazuaki Watanabe, and Takeo Kawahara
: pp. 690-698
Text Mining Analysis of Radiological Information from Newspapers as Compared with Social Media on the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident
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Reiko Kanda, Satsuki Tsuji, and Hidenori Yonehara
: pp. 699-708
The Impact of Disasters on Japan’s Inbound Tourism Demand
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Lihui Wu and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 709-718
Near-Surface Geophysical Profiling Near Former Location of K-NET Tsukidate Strong Motion Station in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan
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Mohamed Amrouche, Hiroaki Yamanaka, Kosuke Chimoto, and Yadab P. Dhakal
: pp. 719-729
Tsunami Safe Town Planning with Evacuation Simulation
Abstract
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Yoshiyuki Yoshida, Takeshi Kimura, Yoshikazu Minegishi, and Tomonori Sano
: pp. 730-742
Index to Evaluate Tsunami Evacuation Potential and its Validation at Yamada, Iwate Prefecture
Abstract
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Yozo Goto
: pp. 743-751
Comparative Study of the Post-Tsunami Recovery Plans After the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake
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Osamu Murao and Tomoyo Hoshi
: pp. 752-756
Consideration of Public Support to Enhance Private Sector’s Business Continuity Management
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Takahiro Ono

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Enhancing Resilience to Climate and Ecosystem Changes in Semi-Arid Africa

Special Issue on Enhancing Resilience to Climate and Ecosystem Changes in Semi-Arid Africa

: p. 411
Enhancing Resilience to Climate and Ecosystem Changes in Semi-Arid Africa
Kazuhiko Takeuchi and Edwin Akonno Gyasi

In 2011, a collaborative project focused on climate and ecosystem change adaptation and resilience studies in Africa (CECAR-Africa) with Ghana as the focal country, was initiated. The goal was to combine climate change and ecosystem change research, and to use that combination as a basis for building an integrated resilience enhancement strategy as a potential model for semi-arid regions across Sub-Saharan Africa.

The Project is being financially supported by the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), a collaborative programme of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). CECAR-Africa involves the following leading climate and ecosystems research organizations in Ghana and Japan: The University of Tokyo; Kyoto University; United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS); University of Ghana; Ghana Meteorological Agency; University for Development Studies; and United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNUINRA).

CECAR-Africa has been operating fully since 2012, with a focus on three thematic areas, namely: Forecast and assessment of climate change impact on agro-ecosystems (Agro-ecosystem resilience); Risk assessment of extreme weather hazards and development of adaptive resource management methods (Engineering resilience); and Implementing capacity development programs for local communities and professionals (social institutions-technical capacity development) using the assessment results derived from work on the first two themes.

This special issue presents major outcomes of the Project so far. The articles featured used various techniques and methods such as field surveys, questionnaires, focal group discussions, land use and cover change analysis, and climate downscaled modelling to investigate the impacts of climate and ecosystem changes on river flows and agriculture, and to assess the local capacity for coping with floods, droughts and disasters, and for enhancing the resilience of farming communities.

We are happy to be able to publish this special issue just in time for an international conference on CECAR-Africa in Tamale, Ghana, on 6-7 August, 2014. It is hoped that the shared research outcomes will facilitate discussions on the project research themes and interactions and exchange of ideas among academics, professionals, and government officials on the way forward for the CECARAfrica Project.

We find it only appropriate to conclude by thanking the authors and reviewers of the articles, and by acknowledging, with gratitude, the local knowledge and other bits and pieces of information contributed by the many anonymous farmers and other people of northern Ghana.

: pp. 412-421
Dynamical Downscaling for Assessment of the Climate in Ghana
Abstract
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Masaru Inatsu, Tsubasa Nakayama, Yoshie Maeda, and Hirotaka Matsuda
: pp. 422-431
Downscaled Climate Change Projections for Wa District in the Savanna Zone of Ghana
Abstract
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Emmanuel Tachie-Obeng, Bruce Hewitson, Edwin Akonno Gyasi, Mark Kofi Abekoe, and George Owusu
: pp. 432-442
Impact of Climate Change on River Flows in the Black Volta River
Abstract
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Nobuhiko Sawai, Kenichiro Kobayashi, Apip, Kaoru Takara, Hirohiko Ishikawa, Muneta Yokomatsu, Subhajyoti Samaddar, Ayilari-Naa Juati, and Gordana Kranjac-Berisavljevic
: pp. 443-451
Effects of Research and Development Expenditure and Climate Variability on Agricultural Productivity Growth in Ghana
Abstract
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Geetha Mohan, Hirotaka Matsuda, Samuel A. Donkoh, Victor Lolig, and Gideon Danso Abbeam
: pp. 452-467
Land Use and Landscape Structural Changes in the Ecoregions of Ghana
Abstract
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Effah Kwabena Antwi, John Boakye-Danquah, Stephen Boahen Asabere, Gerald A. B. Yiran, Seyram Kofi Loh, Kwabena Gyekye Awere, Felix K. Abagale, Kwabena Owusu Asubonteng, Emmanuel Morgan Attua, and Alex Barimah Owusu
: pp. 468-474
Dry Spells Occurrence in Tamale, Northern Ghana – Review of Available Information
Abstract
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Gordana Kranjac-Berisavljevic, Shayibu Abdul-Ghanyu, Bizoola Zinzoola Gandaa, and Felix K. Abagale
: pp. 475-483
Cropping Systems in Some Drought-Prone Communities of the Northern Region of Ghana: Factors Affecting the Introduction of Rice
Abstract
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Vincent Kodjo Avornyo, Osamu Ito, Gordana Kranjac-Berisavljevic, Osamu Saito, and Kazuhiko Takeuchi
: pp. 484-500
Impact of Farm Management Practices and Agricultural Land Use on Soil Organic Carbon Storage Potential in the Savannah Ecological Zone of Northern Ghana
Abstract
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John Boakye-Danquah, Effah Kwabena Antwi, Osamu Saito, Mark Kofi Abekoe, and Kazuhiko Takeuchi
: pp. 501-515
Provisioning Ecosystem Services in Rural Savanna Landscapes of Northern Ghana: An Assessment of Supply, Utilization, and Drivers of Change
Abstract
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Yaw Agyeman Boafo, Osamu Saito, and Kazuhiko Takeuchi
: pp. 516-528
Farmer-Perceived Effects of Climate Change on Livelihoods in Wa West District, Upper West Region of Ghana
Abstract
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Yasuko Kusakari, Kwabena Owusu Asubonteng, Godfred Seidu Jasaw, Frederick Dayour, Togbiga Dzivenu, Victor Lolig, Samuel A. Donkoh, Francis Kwabena Obeng, Bizoola Gandaa, and Gordana Kranjac-Berisavljevic
: pp. 529-541
Assessing Rural Communities Concerns for Improved Climate Change Adaptation Strategies in Northern Ghana
Abstract
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Subhajyoti Samaddar, Muneta Yokomatsu, Togbiga Dzivenu, Martin Oteng-Ababio, Mujeeb Rahaman Adams, Frederick Dayour, and Hirohiko Ishikawa
: pp. 542-553
Households’ Coping Strategies in Drought- and Flood-Prone Communities in Northern Ghana
Abstract
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Victor Lolig, Samuel A. Donkoh, Francis Kwabena Obeng, Isaac Gershon Kodwo Ansah, Godfred Seidu Jasaw, Yasuko Kusakari, Kwabena Owusu Asubonteng, Bizoola Gandaa, Frederick Dayour, Togbiga Dzivenu, and Gordana Kranjac-Berisavljevic
: pp. 554-562
Framing Community Resilience Through Mobility and Gender
Abstract
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Kei Otsuki, Godfred Seidu Jasaw, and Victor Lolig

Regular Papers

: pp. 563-570
Housing Renovation After the 2011 Thailand Flood in Ayutthaya
Abstract
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Titaya Sararit and Tamiyo Kondo
: pp. 571-578
Differences in Subjective Estimation of Risks and Assessment for the Modified Tsunami Warning System by the Japan Meteorological Agency Among University Students Located in Damaged and Non-Damaged Prefectures Around the Period of the 2011 off Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Erina Gyoba

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Challenges of Earthquake Forecast Research Illuminated by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

Special Issue on Challenges of Earthquake Forecast Research Illuminated by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

: p. 247
Challenges of Earthquake Forecast Research Illuminated by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake
Naoshi Hirata and Aitaro Kato

The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, hereafter referred to as Tohoku-Oki earthquake, occurring off northeastern Japan’s Pacific coast on March 11, 2011 had a moment magnitude of 9.0 and generated a tsunami responsible for most of the deaths of the event’s 19,000 victims. Identifying scientifically what happened before, on, and after March 11 is one starting point for a discussion on how to reduce casualties and mitigate the impact of such natural disasters. The 14 papers in this special issue cover incidents related to pre-, co- and post-seismic phenomena, including volcanoes. Three papers discuss why and how such a large quake occurred. Three more papers go into the implications of short- and long-term crustal deformations seen in northeastern Japan. Four papers detail short- and long-term phenomena leading to the Tohoku-Oki quake. Two papers discuss real-time tsunami forecasting based on off-shore and on-shore geodetic, seismic and tsunami observation data. The last two papers explore the effects of the 2011 temblor on volcanic phenomena.

The magnitude 9.0 produced in the 2011 event is the largest historically recorded in Japan and may not necessarily have been anticipated beforehand, and the generation mechanism behind such a gigantic occurrence is not yet completely understood. Even so, preparations should be made for such earthquakes in other parts of Japan and in other countries. The Nankai trough is an example of areas that require our attention.

A national project for observation and study for earthquake prediction is now being integrated into a new program, Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Observation and Research Program (2014-2019). Studies presented in this special issue are also being supported in part by this program.

We are certain that readers will find that this special issue will contribute much to our understanding of gigantic earthquakes and at least some of the measure to be taken in preparation for such natural phenomena. Finally, we extend our sincere thanks to all of the contributors and reviewers involved with these articles.

: pp. 248-251
The Largest Earthquakes We Should Prepare for
Abstract
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Toru Matsuzawa
: pp. 252-263
What Caused the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake? : Effects of Dynamic Weakening
Abstract
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Bunichiro Shibazaki and Hiroyuki Noda
: pp. 264-271
Modeling Earthquakes Using Fractal Circular Patch Models with Lessons from the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake
Abstract
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Satoshi Ide and Hideo Aochi
: pp. 272-280
Review: Source Models of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Long-Term Forecast of Large Earthquakes
Abstract
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Kenji Satake and Yushiro Fujii
: pp. 281-293
Radiation and Generation of Short- and Long-Period Ground Motions from the 2011 Off Tohoku, Japan, Mw9.0 Earthquake
Abstract
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Takashi Furumura
: pp. 294-302
Pre-, Co-, and Post-Seismic Deformation of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and its Implication to a Paradox in Short-Term and Long-Term Deformation
Abstract
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Takuya Nishimura
: pp. 303-310
Precursory Phenomena Possibly Related to the 2011 M9.0 Off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Toshiyasu Nagao, Yoshiaki Orihara, and Masashi Kamogawa
: pp. 311-316
Slow Slip Transients Before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake
Abstract
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Aitaro Kato
: pp. 317-329
Contribution of Slow Earthquake Study for Assessing the Occurrence Potential of Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
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Kazushige Obara
: pp. 330-338
Recent Issues Affecting Forecast of Subduction Zone Great Earthquakes in Japan Through Paleoseismological Study
Abstract
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Masanobu Shishikura
: pp. 339-357
Review on Near-Field Tsunami Forecasting from Offshore Tsunami Data and Onshore GNSS Data for Tsunami Early Warning
Abstract
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Hiroaki Tsushima and Yusaku Ohta
: pp. 358-364
Real-Time Tsunami Inundation Forecast for a Recurrence of 17th Century Great Hokkaido Earthquake in Japan
Abstract
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Yuichiro Tanioka, Aditya Riadi Gusman, Kei Ioki, and Yugo Nakamura
: pp. 365-372
Quasi-Static Stress Change Around Mount Fuji Region Due to Tohoku Mega-Thrust Earthquake
Abstract
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Eisuke Fujita, Tomofumi Kozono, Norio Toda, Aiko Kikuchi, and Yoshiaki Ida
: pp. 373-380
Volcanic Subsidence Triggered by Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
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Youichiro Takada and Yo Fukushima

Regular Papers

: pp. 381-399
Data Model of the Strategic Action Planning and Scheduling Problem in a Disaster Response Team
Abstract
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Reza Nourjou, Pedro Szekely, Michinori Hatayama, Mohsen Ghafory-Ashtiany, and Stephen F. Smith

No.2

(Mar)

Special Issue on “Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters

Special Issue on “Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters

: p. 107
“Urban Resilience” for Mega Earthquake Disasters
Haruo Hayashi and Shingo Suzuki

Tokyo Metropolitan Earthquake and Nankai Trough Earthquakes predicted to hit Japan in the near future makes it urgent that the impact of urban earthquake disasters be reduced by every means possible.

To promote research to this end, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan launched a Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for UrbanMega Earthquake Disasters in 2012 as a five-year R&D effort embracing three academic disciplines – earth and physical sciences, structural engineering, and social sciences. This project in turn consists of three subprojects – Subproject on the earthquake hazard mechanism and risk evaluation of southern Kanto region, Subproject to develop rapid damage assessment and recovery technology of urban function, and Subproject to develop resilient society improving disaster management competence.

This special issue features findings and achievements from this last subproject, whose goal is to enhance society’s resilience based on the experiences and lessons of the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster that crippled Kobe, the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster that prostrated Japan’s northeastern Pacific coast and other such disasters.

Concretely speaking, by integrating the wisdom of disaster management researchers nationwide and collaborating with other subprojects, this subproject proposes disseminating disaster information technologies and training methodologies to build up disaster preparedness. This, in turn, is aided by improving disaster literacy and competence among both the general public and disaster management personnel.

Focusing on the three major metropolitan areas of Tokyo, Nagoya, and Osaka, where two-thirds of Japan’s population and three-fourths of the nation’s total assets are concentrated, Web-based disaster information management and dissemination services are being proposed and examined for effectiveness through demonstration experiments and social implementation.

In this issue of JDR, we are introducing 11 papers and reports from researchers involved in this subproject to present initial interim findings and progress during the first half of this five-year effort. In doing so, the authors and editors of this issue gratefully acknowledge the generous financial support of MEXT in these studies.

: pp. 108-120
Modification and Validation of an Assessment Model of Post-Earthquake Lifeline Serviceability Based on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster
Abstract
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Nobuoto Nojima and Hiroki Kato
: pp. 121-127
Development of Damage Functions on Road Infrastructures Subjected to Extreme Ground Excitations by Analyzing Damage in the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
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Gaku Shoji and Tomoharu Nakamura
: pp. 128-138
Development of Urban Resilience GeoPortal Online for the Better Understanding of Disaster Scenarios
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Shingo Suzuki, Haruo Hayashi, and Masafumi Hosokawa
: pp. 139-148
Implementation of Prototype Mobile Application Operated on Smartphones for Micromedia Service
Abstract
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Munenari Inoguchi, Keiko Tamura, Satomi Sudo, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 149-160
Macro Analysis of Initial Responses from Yabuki Municipal Government After the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Muneyoshi Numada and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 161-175
Are Cash for Work (CFW) Programs Effective to Promote Disaster Recovery? Evidence from the Case of Fukushima Prefecture
Abstract
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Shingo Nagamatsu
: pp. 176-187
Systematization and Sharing of Disaster Management Literacy by DMLH
Abstract
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Reo Kimura, Haruo Hayashi, Shingo Suzuki, Kosuke Kobayashi, Kenshin Urabe, Satoshi Inoue, and Takahiro Nishino
: pp. 188-197
Development of Training System for Building Damage Assessment Using Actual Buildings
Abstract
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Satoshi Tanaka and Kishie Shigekawa
: pp. 198-205
How Can We Collect and Summarize Information About Emergency Response Operations?
Abstract
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Norio Maki
: pp. 206-215
A Fundamental Study of Efficiency of Information Processing in Emergency Operations Center
Abstract
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Fumiaki Ichinose, Yuji Maeda, Naoko Kosaka, Mitsuhiro Higashida, Masahiro Sugiyama, Hideki Takeda, Tomomi Yamamoto, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 216-236
Practice on an Education and Training Program to Development of Response Literacy to Earthquake Disaster in a Central Business District in Japan
Abstract
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Yoe Masuzawa, Yoshiaki Hisada, Masahiro Murakami, Jun Shindo, Masamitsu Miyamura, Hitoshi Suwa, Satoshi Tanaka, Kaoru Mizukoshi, and Yosuke Nakajima

No.1

(Feb)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: pp. 3-16
Next Generation of Soil-Structure Interaction Models for Design of Nuclear Power Plants
Abstract
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Alexander G. Tyapin
: pp. 17-26
Estimation of the Dynamic Properties and Seismic Response of a Populated Slope in Lima, Peru
Abstract
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Carlos Gonzales, Shoichi Nakai, Toru Sekiguchi, Diana Calderon, Zenon Aguilar, and Fernando Lazares
: pp. 27-34
Post-Disaster Local Collaboration on Residential Power Saving in Japan: Citizen Networks and Linkage with Local Government and the Workplace
Abstract
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Hidenori Nakamura
: pp. 35-41
Risk Measuring Model on Public Liability Fire and Empirical Study in China
Abstract
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Guo-Xue Gu and Shang-Mei Zhao
: pp. 42-47
Typhoon Economic Loss Prediction in China by Applying General Regression Neural Network and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis
Abstract
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Bo Cheng, Ling Cheng, and Lingmin Jiang
: pp. 48-54
Secular Changes in the Tidal Amplitude and Influence of Sea-Level Rise in the East China Sea
Abstract
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Akira Tai and Kaori Tanaka
: pp. 55-68
Development of an Integrated Decision-Making Method for Effective Flood Early Warning System
Abstract
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Mamoru Miyamoto, Rabindra Osti, and Toshio Okazumi
: pp. 69-77
Uncertainty Estimation During the Process of Flood Risk Assessment in Developing Countries – Case Study in the Pampanga River Basin –
Abstract
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Toshio Okazumi, Mamoru Miyamoto, Badri Bhakta Shrestha, and Maksym Gusyev
: pp. 78-85
New Development of Functions of a Dry Dam for an Adaptation to Climate Change
Abstract
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Akira Tai, Hideo Oshikawa, and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 86-91
Local Dialysis Disaster Relief During Two Torrential Downpours on Amami-Ohshima Island
Abstract
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Hiroaki Nishimura, Ichiro Kagara, Satoru Inokuchi, Hideki Enokida, Hiroshi Hayami, and Masayuki Nakagawa

Vol.8 (2013)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Wind Disasters

Special Issue on Wind Disasters

: p. 1033
Wind Disasters
Yukio Tamura

Increasing numbers of devastating weather events such as Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines and tornadoes in the US and Japan are suggesting that nature’s destructive power is having a growing worldwide impact.

These events follow the occurrence of such disasters as Cyclone Sidr in 2007 in Bangladesh and Cyclone Nargis in 2008 in Myanmar, especially in the alarming numbers of deaths and injuries and concomitant property loss.

The wind engineering community has taken the initiative in globally promoting wind hazard research and education over the last several decades and is continuing to devote its efforts and energy to producing and providing techniques in advanced wind hazard mitigation to developing countries prone to typhoons and cyclones.

Mitigating the effects of wind hazards on a global plane has thus become a top priority because most of the economic and other loss due globally to natural disasters is caused by extreme wind and water events. Calamitous tropical cyclones generally bring with them high waves, storm surges, heavy rain, flooding, landslides and lightning.

This ongoing process underscores the pressing need to pool expertise and cooperation in reducing such loss. The loss of lives and related financial loss and waste due to such disasters is continuing to increase significantly. It has therefore been hypothesized that global warming and climate change are potentially exacerbating such scenarios as the intensity of weather-related disasters grows.

This special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research focusing on wind-induced disasters is thus both meaningful and timely. As the Guest Editor, I am most pleased to have this opportunity to present and share the latest in knowledge, information and resources on wind damage mitigation to all those working in mitigation efforts and to society as a whole.

Finally, I extend our sincere thanks to all of the contributors and reviewers involved with these articles.

: pp. 1034-1041
Development of the EF-Scale for Tornado Intensity
Abstract
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Kishor C. Mehta
: pp. 1042-1051
Structural Damage Under Multiple Hazards in Coastal Environments
Abstract
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Megan C. McCullough, Ahsan Kareem, Aaron S. Donahue, and Joannes J. Westerink
: pp. 1052-1060
Characteristics of Damages of Severe Local Storms Based on Field Surveys in Bangladesh
Abstract
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Yusuke Yamane, Masashi Kiguchi, Taiichi Hayashi, Ashraf M. Dewan, and Toru Terao
: pp. 1061-1067
Residential Damage Patterns Following the 2011 Tuscaloosa, AL and Joplin, MO Tornadoes
Abstract
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David B. Roueche and David O. Prevatt
: pp. 1068-1070
Investigation of the Ferry Disaster Incident of Assam (India) on April 30, 2012
Abstract
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Kalyan Kumar Das
: pp. 1071-1077
Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Features of Tornadic Storms Occurred in Kanto, Japan, on May 6, 2012
Abstract
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Fumiaki Kobayashi and Mika Yamaji
: pp. 1078-1083
Tornado Disaster 2012 in Northern Kanto and the Features of Tornado Disasters in Japan
Abstract
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Junji Maeda and Eriko Tomokiyo
: pp. 1084-1089
Critical Equivalent Wind Speeds for Overturning and Roof Blow-off of 2-StoryWooden Houses
Abstract
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Rei Okada, Yukio Tamura, Masahiro Matsui, and Akihito Yoshida
: pp. 1090-1095
Wind Speed of Tornado to Make a Road Damage
Abstract
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Minoru Noda and Fumiaki Nagao
: pp. 1096-1102
Statistical Summary and Case Studies of Strong Wind Damage in China
Abstract
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Shuyang Cao and Jin Wang

Regular Papers

: pp. 1103-1113
Wind Resistance of Vented Vinyl and Aluminum Soffit Panel Systems
Abstract
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C. L. Alexander, F. J. Masters, M. J. Morrison, and S. Bolton
: pp. 1114-1119
Missile Impact Resistant Test of Glasses According to ISO 16932
Abstract
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Takashi Maruyama, Hiromasa Kawai, Hiroaki Nishimura, and Mayuko Hanatani

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Strong Ground Motion Prediction and Seismic Hazard Assessment

Special Issue on Strong Ground Motion Prediction and Seismic Hazard Assessment

: p. 847
Strong Ground Motion Prediction and Seismic Hazard Assessment
Hiroyuki Fujiwara

We have been conducting seismic hazard assessment for Japan under the guidance of the Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion of Japan since the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu Earthquake, and have made National Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan for use in estimating strong ground motion caused by future earthquakes.

This special issue reviews the results of these efforts. Such work includes the development of seismic hazard assessment methodology for Japan, highly accurate prediction techniques for strong seismic ground motion and modeling underground structures for evaluating strong ground motion. Related research on utilization initiatives and risk assessment based on hazard information has also been conducted. An open Web system – the Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station (J-SHIS) – has even been developed to provide information interactively.

The 2011 Mw9.0 Great East Japan Earthquake was the largest such event recorded in the history of Japan. This megathrust earthquake was not considered in National Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan. But efforts toward revising seismic hazard assessment in Japan are progressing based on lessons learned from this earthquake.

Hazard assessment is currently being reviewed in relation to the large earthquakes anticipated to occur in the near future based in the Sagami Trough and the Nankai Trough in the waters of offshore Japan. This assessment, which considers earthquakes larger than those assumed to have occurred in the past, is being reviewed as of this writing.

In light of these pressing circumstances, studies are now being implemented to evaluate the long-period ground motion accompanying these large earthquakes.

The knowledge that has been cultivated in Japan in terms of seismic hazard assessment has reached a high level, and it is important to expand such knowledge both internationally and domestically. This is just one of the reasons that efforts here in Japan are being made to help improve the level of seismic hazard assessment in the Asian region and throughout the entire world.

It is expected that this special issue will help contribute to the further development of strong ground motion prediction and seismic hazard assessment now and in the future.

Finally, I extend our sincere thanks to all of the contributors and reviewers involved with these articles.

: pp. 848-860
Seismic Hazard Assessment for Japan: Reconsiderations After the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Nobuyuki Morikawa, and Toshihiko Okumura
: pp. 861-868
Exposure Analysis Using the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan
Abstract
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Nobuoto Nojima, Satoshi Fujikawa, Yutaka Ishikawa, Toshihiko Okumura, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, and Nobuyuki Morikawa
: pp. 869-877
Development of J-SHIS and Applications Using API
Abstract
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Hiroki Azuma, Shinichi Kawai, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 878-888
A New Ground Motion Prediction Equation for Japan Applicable up to M9 Mega-Earthquake
Abstract
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Nobuyuki Morikawa and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 889-903
Modeling of the Subsurface Structure from the Seismic Bedrock to the Ground Surface for a Broadband Strong Motion Evaluation
Abstract
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Shigeki Senna, Takahiro Maeda, Yoshiaki Inagaki, Haruhiko Suzuki, Hisanori Matsuyama, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 904-911
Nationwide 7.5-Arc-Second Japan Engineering Geomorphologic Classification Map and Vs30 Zoning
Abstract
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Kazue Wakamatsu and Masashi Matsuoka
: pp. 912-925
Finite-Difference Simulation of Long-Period Ground Motion for the Nankai Trough Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
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Takahiro Maeda, Nobuyuki Morikawa, Asako Iwaki, Shin Aoi, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 926-940
Finite-Difference Simulation of Long-Period Ground Motion for the Sagami Trough Megathrust Earthquakes
Abstract
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Asako Iwaki, Nobuyuki Morikawa, Takahiro Maeda, Shin Aoi, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 941-961
Seismic Risk Evaluation on Building Damage of Municipalities Based on the Seismic Activity Model in National Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan
Abstract
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Masatsugu Wakaura, Yasushi Komaru, Satoshi Shimizu, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, and Nobuyuki Morikawa
: pp. 962-973
Development of Earthquake Risk Evaluation Method for Individual Buildings Intended for Utilization in Local Communities
Abstract
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Ippei Kondo, Ryo Wakabayashi, Kaoru Mizukoshi, Akihiro Kusaka, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, and Nobusuke Hasegawa
: pp. 974-980
Case Study for Local Municipal Program for Seismic Risk Assessment
Abstract
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Nobusuke Hasegawa
: pp. 981-989
Prototype of a Real-Time System for Earthquake Damage Estimation in Japan
Abstract
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Hiromitsu Nakamura, Shin Aoi, Takashi Kunugi, Wataru Suzuki, and Hiroyuki Fujiwara
: pp. 990-1000
Development and Testing of a Mobile Application for Recording and Analyzing Seismic Data
Abstract
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Shohei Naito, Hiroki Azuma, Shigeki Senna, Mutsuhiro Yoshizawa, Hiromitsu Nakamura, Ken Xiansheng Hao, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, Yoshiharu Hirayama, Noboru Yuki, and Minoru Yoshida
: pp. 1001-1007
Recent Destructive Earthquakes and International Collaboration for Seismic Hazard Assessment
Abstract
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Ken Xiansheng Hao and Hiroyuki Fujiwara

Regular Papers

: pp. 1009-1017
Effectiveness of Disaster-Based School Program on Students’ Earthquake-Preparedness
Abstract
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Wignyo Adiyoso and Hidehiko Kanegae
: pp. 1018-1024
Indirect Economic Loss Estimation due to Seismic Highway Transportation System Disruption in “5.12” Wenchuan Earthquake
Abstract
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Yan Shi and Shaoyu Wang

No.sp

(Sep)

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part II

Special Issue on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part II

: p. 729
the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Part II
Haruo Hayashi

The Journal of Disaster Research (JDR), published bimonthly in English since 2006 as a Japan-based academic journal, promotes multidisciplinary research on disaster reduction due to all hazards – natural, unintended and intended.

Since the Great East Japan Earthquake disaster on March 11, 2011, we have worked as our duty to provide a forum for all stakeholders and researchers in the world to describe what happened scientifically in terms of human and property damage and in subsequent social and economic damage by this unprecedented occurrence, including the incident involving Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

As one contribution, JDR is publishing special annual issues for the next five years on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster – with NO PAGE CHARGES TO CONTRIBUTORS. This effort began in 2012.

The purpose of these special issues is to record, communicate and share the lessons learned from this disaster.

In our second special issue, 16 papers were submitted and we are proud to introduce 11 papers touching on different aspects of the Great East Japan Earthquake disaster. We are sure you will find these papers interesting and informative.

We also look forward to receiving contributions for the third special issue, which will be published in the summer of 2014.

This special issue is sponsored by following companies. We deeply appreciate their cooperation.

Silver sponsor: Esri Japan Corporation

Bronze sponsor: CALBEE, Inc.

Bronze sponsor: NIKKEN SEKKEI

: pp. 730-736
A Study on Social Responsibility of Engineers and Managers
Abstract
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Kiyoshi Sato
: pp. 737-745
The Six Principles of Recovery: A Guideline for Preparing for Future Disaster Recoveries
Abstract
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Takaaki Kato, Yasmin Bhattacharya, Hiroshi Sugata, and Rie Otagiri
: pp. 746-755
Evidence-Based Analysis of Search and Rescue Operations Following the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Atsushi Koresawa
: pp. 756-761
A Study on Internal Radiation Exposure due to 137Cs Caused by Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident
Abstract
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Tomoyuki Furutani, Masaharu Tsubokura, Keisuke Uehara, Masahiko Nihei, and Yu Sakuma
: pp. 762-772
Consumer Awareness and Attitude on Radiocesium Food Contamination Following Fukushima Incident
Abstract
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Hiromi Hosono, Yuko Kumagai, and Tsutomu Sekizaki
: pp. 773-780
Significant Factors for Implementing BCP
Abstract
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Shinichi Okabe and Akio Nagahira
: pp. 781-791
Long-Period Ground Motions Observed in the Northern Part of Kanto Basin, During the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake, Japan
Abstract
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Seiji Tsuno, Andi Muhamad Pramatadie, Yadab P. Dhakal, Kosuke Chimoto, Wakana Tsutsumi, and Hiroaki Yamanaka
: pp. 792-801
Study on the Changes in People’s Consciousness Regarding the Earthquake Early Warning Before and After the Great East Japan Earthquake – Analysis Based on Regular Disaster Information Survey Results –
Abstract
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Miho Ohara and Atsushi Tanaka
: pp. 802-813
Foreigners’ Evacuation Behavior in the Great East Japan Earthquake: A Case of Iwaki City in Fukushima Prefecture
Abstract
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Md. Faiz Shah and Osamu Murao
: pp. 814-825
The Emergence of Food Panic: Evidence from the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Oscar A. Gómez S.
: pp. 826-834
Survival of Shrines from the 2011 Great Tsunami
Abstract
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Takaaki Uda and Kazuya Sakai

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami
Special Issue on Dual Use

Special Issue on the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami

: pp. 547-548
the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami
Tomoyuki Takahashi and Nobuo Shuto

An unprecedented M9.0 earthquake occurring at 14:46 local time on March 11, 2011, off of northeast Japan’s Pacific Ocean generated a huge tsunami which had a run-up of over 40 m at the highest point and nearly 20,000 lives were lost. The tsunami demonstrated the need to drastically readdress current tsunami countermeasures.

“Guidebook for Tsunami Preparedness in Local Hazard Mitigation Planning” published prior to the March 11 tsunami had already estimated, as one of the cases of tsunami assumptions, that the tsunami could be generated by the largest earthquake near off the Sanriku Coast predicted by the recent seismology. The seismotectonics had predicted that off the Sanriku Coast consisted of three independent blocks, which could conceivably cause an M8.6 earthquake at the largest. However, three blocks were not independent and they moved continuously to yield an earthquake of M9.0.

The Guidebook had recommended a combination of three approaches for handling such a tsunami; Construction of defense structures, Tsunami-resilient town development, and Disaster prevention systems – defense structures were not expected to completely prevent every tsunami but only reduce its effect. Caissons forming part of Kamaishi Port’s tsunami breakwaters and registered in Guinness World Records, were overturned but reduced the tsunami height from 14 m outside the port to 8 m inside. Many coastal dikes were also destroyed, even though three surfaces – fore slope, top slope, and rear slope – had been protected using concrete and other means. Such phenomena pinpoint the importance of toe protection against erosion.

Since 2004, tsunami inundation hazard maps have been distributed to communities in Japan as an aid to public education and as part of the country’s nationwide disaster prevention system. Unexpectedly, these maps had a negative effect in many places where residents living outside inundation areas mentioned on the hazard maps believed they were safe under all condition. Many did not in fact keep track of the actual tsunami rising in front of their very eyes and not evacuate, thus losing their lives.

The tsunami hitting the coast of the Fukushima Prefecture had a run-up height almost double that designed in defense plans. The Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plants of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) located on ground 4.8 m above sea level were immerged and a concurrent electric system failure led to total plant shutdown.

The Fukushima nuclear disaster itself has become well known worldwide. The effects of the tsunami, however, are less so, despite damage such as fires, railroad destruction and drifting ships caused by the tsunami. With the nuclear incident overshadowing such effects, we are concerned that these results might be overlooked.

To better prepare against potential future tsunami disasters, we must understand clearly what sort and how such diverse damage has been generated by the 2011 tsunami. This special issue focuses on the various types of tsunami-induced damages, emphasizing the valuable data and modeling obtained from field investigations in the tsunami-devastated areas. It will be more than worth publication if this special issue contributes in whatever way to furthering tsunami disaster research.

Finally, we extend our sincere thanks to all of the contributors and reviewers involved with these articles.

(written by Nobuo Shuto and Tomoyuki Takahashi)

: pp. 549-560
Lessons from the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami Disaster
Abstract
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Shunichi Koshimura, Satomi Hayashi, and Hideomi Gokon
: pp. 561-572
The 2011 Tohoku Tsunami Flow Velocity Estimation by the Aerial Video Analysis and Numerical Modeling
Abstract
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Satomi Hayashi and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 573-583
Risk Evaluation of Drifting Ship by Tsunami
Abstract
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Yusuke Suga, Shunichi Koshimura, and Ei-ichi Kobayashi
: pp. 584-593
Tsunami Fires After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Akihiko Hokugo, Tomoaki Nishino, and Takuya Inada
: pp. 594-604
Damage in Ports due to the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami
Abstract
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Takashi Tomita, Taro Arikawa, and Tadashi Asai
: pp. 605-611
Estimation of Wave Force Acting on Bridge Superstructures due to the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami
Abstract
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Shojiro Kataoka and Masahiro Kaneko
: pp. 612-625
Damages to Shore Protection Facilities Induced by the Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami
Abstract
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Fuminori Kato, Yoshio Suwa, Kunihiro Watanabe, and Satoshi Hatogai
: pp. 626-634
The Damage and Recovery Measures of Sewage Treatment Systems Caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Hiroaki Morita
: pp. 635-642
Railway Structure Damage to the East Japan Railway Company by the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami
Abstract
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Susumu Mafune, Hiroto Suzuki, Torajiro Fujiwara, and Shin-ichiro Nozawa

Special Issue on Dual Use

: p. 643
Dual Use
Hiroshi Yoshikura

“Dual use” can be defined as potential use of science and technology for destructive purpose as well as for constructive purposes. While the history of the dual use is long (such as, debate on atomic energy), after the anthrax incident in the wake of the terrorist attack of World Trade Center in New York on September 2001, “dual use” issue surfaced as the matter of “biosecurity.” The debate on biosecurity was further ignited by the US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity’s recommendation on the publication of experiments dealing with the host range expansion of the avian influenza virus H5N1.

The present special issue deals with the “dual use” mainly from the “biosecurity” view point, including the bioweapon and its history, biosecurity negotiation in the Biological Weapon Convention, regulatory framework of use of pathogens and its implementation, ethical issues, education of the “dual use” issues for life scientists, the feasibility of direct application of the published data to the dual use and the recent progress of synthetic biology and its biosecurity implication.

The present guest editor wishes that these articles will stimulate debate on “dual use” issues in various branches of science and technology, as he realizes that “dual use” issue is becoming prominent not only in microbiological researches but also in other activities, such as, IT, robotics, neuroscience, psychology, economics, etc. He extends his sincere thanks to all of the contributors and reviewers involved with these articles.

: pp. 644-653
Biosecurity, Dual Use and Research Ethics
Abstract
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Hiroshi Yoshikura
: pp. 654-666
Bioweapons and Dual-Use Research of Concern
Abstract
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Nariyoshi Shinomiya, Masamichi Minehata, and Malcolm Dando
: pp. 667-673
Dual-Use Issues in the Life Sciences: Outcomes of the Seventh Review Conference of the Biological Weapons Convention
Abstract
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Kiwako Tanaka
: pp. 674-685
Promoting Education of Dual-Use Issues for Life Scientists: A Comprehensive Approach
Abstract
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Masamichi Minehata, Judi Sture, Nariyoshi Shinomiya, Simon Whitby, and Malcolm Dando
: pp. 686-692
Japanese Regulatory Space on Biosecurity and Dual Use Research of Concern
Abstract
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Tomohiko Makino
: pp. 693-697
Dual Use Research of Concern Issues in the Field of Microbiology Research in Japan
Abstract
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Masayuki Saijo
: pp. 698-704
Synthetic Biology and Dual Use
Abstract
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Daisuke Kiga
: pp. 705-713
Dual-Use Research and the Myth of Easy Replication
Abstract
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Sonia Ben Ouagrham-Gormley
: pp. 714-716
Dual Use in Pathogen Research
Abstract
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Takashi Okamoto

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on 2011 Thailand Flood

Special Issue on 2011 Thailand Flood

: p. 379
2011 Thailand Flood
Keiichi Toda

Numerous global water disasters have devastated many regions, and some may be due to climate change. Severe water disasters not only may inflict heavily damage on industry but may also leave many persons dead or seriously injured.

The 2011 Thailand flood is a typical example of such disasters. In it, a wide area of the Chao Phraya River basin, where Bangkok is located, was inundated for a long period. Damage by the flood affected not only the domestic scene but also economies and industries all over the world. Many academicians and researchers have executed field surveys from various academic aspects and have studied flood disasters to clarify what actually occurred and to consider what must be done to mitigate such flood events in the future.

The Journal of Disaster Research has planned a special issue on this severe flooding in Thailand. Having participated in field surveys and found the flood worth studying more deeply, I decided to contribute to this special issue as a Guest Editor.

This special issue contains 9 articles, 7 papers and 2 reports, all of which have been peer-reviewed. The broad topics covered range from a detailed field survey to flood and inundation simulation.

I would like to extend sincere thanks to all of the contributors and reviewers involved in producing these articles. Especially, I would especially like to express my gratitude to Dr. Hiroshi Takebayashi, Associate Professor, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan, for his great support. I look forward with great anticipation to any feedback that readers may be able to provide regarding these articles.

: pp. 380-385
2011 Thailand Flood
Abstract
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Sanit Wongsa
: pp. 386-396
Field and Interview Surveys of the Flood of 2011, Thailand
Abstract
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Hiroshi Takebayashi, Keiichi Toda, Hajime Nakagawa, and Hao Zhang
: pp. 397-405
Impacts of Mid-Rainy Season Rainfall on Runoff into the Chao Phraya River, Thailand
Abstract
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Shunji Kotsuki and Kenji Tanaka
: pp. 406-414
Approach to Estimate the Flood Damage in Sukhothai Province Using Flood Simulation
Abstract
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Anurak Sriariyawat, Kwanchai Pakoksung, Takahiro Sayama, Shigenobu Tanaka, and Sucharit Koontanakulvong
: pp. 415-423
Development of a Flow Routing Model Including Inundation Effect for the Extreme Flood in the Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand 2011
Abstract
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Supattana Wichakul, Yasuto Tachikawa, Michiharu Shiiba, and Kazuaki Yorozu
: pp. 424-431
Investigation Report on the Flooding Condition in the Midstream Area of Chao Praya River During the Thai Flooding in 2011
Abstract
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Kohei Fujii, Kenichi Tsukahara, Hironori Hayashi, Yasuhiro Mitani, Hiro Ikemi, Cham Tau Chia, and Yukihiro Shimatani
: pp. 432-446
Application of the Probability Evaluation for the Seasonal Reservoir Operation on Flood Mitigation and Water Supply in the Chao Phraya River Watershed, Thailand
Abstract
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Daisuke Komori, Cherry May Mateo, Akane Saya, Shinichiro Nakamura, Masashi Kiguchi, Phonchai Klinkhachorn, Thada Sukhapunnaphan, Adisorn Champathong, Kimio Takeya, and TaikanOki
: pp. 447-455
Study of Flood Control Capability and Advanced Application of Multiple Dams Constructed in Series
Abstract
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Hideo Oshikawa, Yuka Mito, and Toshimitsu Komatsu
: pp. 456-464
Solid Waste Management in Bangkok at 2011 Thailand Floods
Abstract
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Hirofumi Nakayama, Takayuki Shimaoka, Kiyoshi Omine, Maryono, Plubcharoensuk Patsaraporn, and Orawan Siriratpiriya

Regular Papers

: pp. 465-472
Options for the Treatment of Uncertainty in Seismic Safety Assessment of Nuclear Power Plants
Abstract
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Tamas Janos Katona
: pp. 473-483
Difference in Typhoon Damage Report Data
Abstract
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Shinya Shimokawa and Takahiro Kayahara
: pp. 484-494
Development of Disaster Knowledge Magazine Using Disaster Knowledge Transmission and Practical Study on its Evaluation
Abstract
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Ryoga Ishihara and Nobuhiko Matsumura
: pp. 495-507
From Temporary to Permanent: Mississippi Cottages After Hurricane Katrina
Abstract
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Elizabeth Maly and Tamiyo Kondo
: pp. 508-511
Psychological Challenges Among Older Adults Following the Christchurch Earthquakes
Abstract
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Michael Annear, Tim Wilkinson, and Sally Keeling
: pp. 512-518
The Construction of a Flood Monitoring System with Alert Distribution Using Google Earth and 3D GIS
Abstract
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Yili Chan and Masatoshi Mori
: pp. 519-525
Use of a Phase-Oriented Management System Against an Outbreak of Infectious Gastroenteritis in an Evacuation Center After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Seisuke Okazawa, Hayato Yamauchi, Tomomi Ichikawa, Ryuji Hayashi, Koichiro Shinoda, Maiko Obi, Takuro Arishima, Akinori Wada, and Kazuyuki Tobe
: pp. 526-533
Shaking Table Test on Seismic Response Properties of “Shicras,” Stones Wrapped in Vegetable Fiber Bags
Abstract
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Hiroshi Fukuyama, Masami Fujisawa, Akio Abe, Toshikazu Kabeyasawa, Zen Shirane, Taiki Saito, and Zenon Aguilar

No.2

(Mar)

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru

Special Issue on Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru

: p. 223
Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru
Fumio Yamazaki and Carlos Zavala

Natural disasters are major threats worldwide, with earthquakes and tsunamis presenting major obstacles to sustainable development, especially in Asia-Pacific countries. Natural hazards must be understood and social resilience improved to reduce the risks of disaster. Because earthquakes and tsunamis are rare but devastating events, data must be collected on a global scale, making international collaboration is inevitable for reducing loss due to these events.

A new international research program called the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) started in 2008 jointly sponsored by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). Our proposal, entitled Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru, was designated as one of the projects in the field of natural disaster prevention in April 2009. Since this project officially started in March 2010, the research program has been promoted by five groups – seismic motion and geotechnical, tsunami, buildings, spatial information database and damage assessment, and disaster mitigation planning – through the strong collaboration of Peruvian and Japanese researchers and stakeholders.

Midway through the project, we decided to publish our research results in the form of English technical papers so that a wide and global range of researchers and practitioners could take advantage of our findings.

This special issue of the Journal of Disaster Research contains 15 articles – an overview of the project and its progress and 14 peer-reviewed papers covering aspects ranging from earthquake and tsunami hazards to risk reduction.

We extend our sincere thanks to all of the contributors and reviewers involved with these articles. We would further deeply appreciate feedback from readers on these papers to prepare for a second special JDR volume on this project within the next two years.

: pp. 224-234
SATREPS Project on Enhancement of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technology in Peru
Abstract
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Fumio Yamazaki and Carlos Zavala
: pp. 235-242
Strong Motion Simulation of the M8.0 August 15, 2007, Pisco Earthquake; Effect of a Multi-Frequency Rupture Process
Abstract
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Nelson Pulido, Hernando Tavera, Zenon Aguilar, Shoichi Nakai, and Fumio Yamazaki
: pp. 243-251
Preliminary Analysis for Evaluation of Local Site Effects in Lima City, Peru from Ground Motion Data by Using the Spectral Inversion Method
Abstract
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Selene Quispe, Hiroaki Yamanaka, Zenon Aguilar, Fernando Lazares, and Hernando Tavera
: pp. 252-258
Estimation of Deep Shear-Wave Velocity Profiles in Lima, Peru, Using Seismometers Arrays
Abstract
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Diana Calderon, Zenon Aguilar, Fernando Lazares, Toru Sekiguchi, and Shoichi Nakai
: pp. 259-265
Evaluation of Surface Soil Amplification for Wide Areas in Lima, Peru
Abstract
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Toru Sekiguchi, Diana Calderon, Shoichi Nakai, Zenon Aguilar, and Fernando Lazares
: pp. 266-273
Seismic Source of 1746 Callao Earthquake from Tsunami Numerical Modeling
Abstract
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Cesar Jimenez, Nabilt Moggiano, Erick Mas, Bruno Adriano, Shunichi Koshimura, Yushiro Fujii, and Hideaki Yanagisawa
: pp. 274-284
Tsunami Inundation Mapping in Lima, for Two Tsunami Source Scenarios
Abstract
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Bruno Adriano, Erick Mas, Shunichi Koshimura, Yushiro Fujii, Sheila Yauri, Cesar Jimenez, and Hideaki Yanagisawa
: pp. 285-295
An Integrated Simulation of Tsunami Hazard and Human Evacuation in La Punta, Peru
Abstract
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Erick Mas, Bruno Adriano, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 296-304
Experimental Study on Flexural Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Walls
Abstract
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Sergio Sunley, Koichi Kusunoki, Taiki Saito, and Carlos Zavala
: pp. 305-311
Experimental Study on Dynamic Behavior of Unreinforced Masonry Walls
Abstract
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Taiki Saito, Luis Moya, Cesar Fajardo, and Koichi Morita
: pp. 312-319
Cyclic Behavior of Low Ductility Walls Considering Perpendicular Action
Abstract
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Carlos Zavala, Patricia Gibu, Luis Lavado, Jenny Taira, Lourdes Cardenas, and Luis Ceferino
: pp. 320-327
Diagnosis for Seismic Vulnerability Evaluation of Historical Buildings in Lima, Peru
Abstract
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Carlos Cuadra, Taiki Saito, and Carlos Zavala
: pp. 328-345
Extraction of Urban Information for Seismic Hazard and Risk Assessment in Lima, Peru Using Satellite Imagery
Abstract
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Masashi Matsuoka, Hiroyuki Miura, Saburoh Midorikawa, and Miguel Estrada
: pp. 346-355
Development of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Estimation Model Based on ALOS/PALSAR Observing the 2007 Peru Earthquake
Abstract
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Masashi Matsuoka and Miguel Estrada
: pp. 356-364
Urban Recovery Process in Pisco After the 2007 Peru Earthquake
Abstract
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Osamu Murao, Tomoyo Hoshi, Miguel Estrada, Kazuya Sugiyasu, Masashi Matsuoka, and Fumio Yamazaki

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Sustainability/Survivability Science for a Resilient Society Adaptable to Extreme Weather Conditions
Abstracts of International Symposium on GCOE-ARS (2012)

Special Issue on Sustainability/Survivability Science for a Resilient Society Adaptable to Extreme Weather Conditions

: p. 3
Extreme Weather and Water-Related Disasters: A Key Issue for the Sustainability and Survivability of Our Society
Kaoru Takara and Haruo Hayashi

1. Extreme Weather and Water-Related Disasters

Extreme weather events frequently take place in many parts of the world, causing various kinds of water-related disasters such as windstorms, floods, high tides, debris flows, droughts, and water-quality issues. This is a key issue for the sustainability and survivability of our society.

The Asian and Pacific region is one of the most disaster-prone areas in the world. It is very adversely affected by natural hazards such as cyclones and typhoons and tsunami caused by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions under the sea. These natural hazards bring severe disasters to all countries in the region where social change, in terms of population and economic growth, is the most dynamic in the world.

Growth in this region of the world has not, however, led to advances in disaster risk management. The situation is getting worse because infrastructure development cannot keep up with growth. Policies for poverty reduction and alleviation are insufficient and the difference between being rich and being poor is increasing.

Vulnerable populations are often those hit worst by hazards and disasters. As the world’s cities expand to occupy ever greater portions of the world’s flood plains, riversides and shorelines, the risk of flooding will continue to outpace both structural and nonstructural mitigation efforts.

“A natural hazard strikes when persons lose their memory of the previous one.” This quotation is from Dr. Torahiko Terada (1878-1935), a former Professor of the University of Tokyo who influenced many Japanese persons as an educator, physicist and philosopher. Persons tend to forget bad memories if they do not experience a similar event for a long time. This lack of experience and ignorance increases the vulnerability of society to disasters.

: pp. 7-17
The Development of Micromedia Transmitting the Disaster-Related Information Against Torrential Rains and Guerrilla Rains
Abstract
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Satomi Sudo, Go Urakawa, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 18-27
The Potential of Fijian Traditional Housing to Cope with Natural Disasters in Rural Fiji
Abstract
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Ayako Fujieda and Hirohide Kobayashi
: pp. 28-36
Japan-Egypt Hydro Network: Science and Technology Collaborative Research for Flash Flood Management
Abstract
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Tetsuya Sumi, Mohamed Saber, and Sameh Ahmad Kantoush
: pp. 37-47
A High-Resolution, Precipitable Water Vapor Monitoring System Using a Dense Network of GNSS Receivers
Abstract
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Kazutoshi Sato, Eugenio Realini, Toshitaka Tsuda, Masanori Oigawa, Yuya Iwaki, Yoshinori Shoji, and Hiromu Seko
: pp. 48-56
An Experimental Data Handling System for Ensemble Numerical Weather Predictions Using a Web-Based Data Server and Analysis Tool “Gfdnavi”
Abstract
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Shigenori Otsuka, Seiya Nishizawa, Takeshi Horinouchi, and Shigeo Yoden
: pp. 57-68
Radar Echo Population of Air-Mass Thunderstorms and Nowcasting of Thunderstorm-Induced Local Heavy Rainfalls Part 1: Statistical Characteristics
Abstract
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Masahito Ishihara
: pp. 69-80
Radar Echo Population of Air-Mass Thunderstorms and Nowcasting of Thunderstorm-Induced Local Heavy Rainfalls Part II: A Feasibility Study on Nowcasting
Abstract
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Masahito Ishihara
: pp. 81-89
Application of Electrical Resistivity Imaging for MeasuringWater Content Distribution on Hillslopes
Abstract
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Yosuke Yamakawa, Naoya Masaoka, Ken’ichirou Kosugi, Yasuyuki Tada, and Takahisa Mizuyama
: pp. 90-94
Localization of Risk Communication Tools: Two Case Studies
Abstract
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Toshiko Kikkawa and Seiji Suzuki
: pp. 95-102
Comparison of Sungkai Tree-Ring Components and Meteorological Data from Western Java, Indonesia
Abstract
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YumikoWatanabe, Shigeki Tamura, Takeshi Nakatsuka, Suyako Tazuru, Junji Sugiyama, Bambang Subiyanto, Toshitaka Tsuda, and Takahiro Tagami
: pp. 103-113
Reversibility Between “Nature” and “Society” Recognized in Extreme Meteorological Phenomenon: Taking an Example of the Flood Disaster in the Toga River in Kobe City
Abstract
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Katsuya Yamori and Motoyuki Ushiyama

Abstracts of International Symposium on GCOE-ARS (2012)

: pp. 114-208
Abstracts of Presentations at the International Symposium on GCOE-ARS (2012)
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Vol.7 (2012)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Selected Papers from 9th CUEE
Special Issue on Infectious Disease Control of Natural Disasters

Special Issue on Selected Papers from 9th CUEE

: p. 671
Selected Papers from 9th CUEE
Kazuhiko Kasai, Kohji Tokimatsu, and Saburoh Midorikawa

The 9th International Conference on Urban Earthquake Engineering (9th CUEE) and the 4th Asia Conference on Earthquake Engineering (4th ACEE) were jointly held on March 6-8, 2012 in Tokyo, as a part of the research activities of the Center for Urban Earthquake Engineering (CUEE), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.

The conference featured state-of-the-art technical presentations on various themes relevant to urban earthquake engineering, followed by special sessions addressing the 11th March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami that resulted in catastrophic damage and an estimated death toll of 20,000. The conference attracted 465 participants from 31 countries, and disseminated 283 papers.

The board members of the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) decided to publish special issues of JDR, selecting papers from the above joint conference, for the purpose of mainly updating status of Japan’s research/technology. The present issue is on the fields of engineering seismology and geotechnical engineering, including extraordinary ground shaking and liquefactions that affected wide areas during the March 11 incident. Other issues such as those on buildings and infrastructures are also planned.

The 8 manuscripts selected and managed by the JDR Guest Editors address the following topics:

– Array observations of ground shaking

– Large peak ground acceleration and site amplification

– Attenuation of the seismic wave

– Impact against the water-supply outages

– Liquefaction in a river levee on soft cohesive ground

– Spread foundation performance affecting superstructure

– Performance of piled raft foundation with grid-form ground improvement

– Liquefaction of levee body and seepage control

The Guest Editors as well as JDR board members thank the authors for their contributions and revisions. They also acknowledge gratefully the reviewers for their invaluable comments on the manuscripts.

: pp. 672-681
Strong-Motion Records Obtained by an Array Observation System During the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Makoto Kamiyama, Tadashi Matsukawa, and Masahiro Anazawa
: pp. 682-692
Estimation of S-Wave Velocity Profiles and Site Amplification Around the K-NET Tsukidate Station, Miyagi Prefecture, with Reference to Large PGA During the 2011 off Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake, Japan
Abstract
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Hiroaki Yamanaka, Kosuke Chimoto, Seiji Tsuno, Yadab. P. Dhakal, Mohamed Amrouche, Nobuyuki Yamada, Shun’ichi Fukumoto, and Kiminobu Eto
: pp. 693-700
Strong Motion Records of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and its Attenuation Characteristics
Abstract
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Saburoh Midorikawa, Hiroyuki Miura, and Tomohiro Atsumi
: pp. 701-710
Analysis of the Impact of Water-Supply Outages Due to Multiple Factors Caused by the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Yasuko Kuwata and Tasuku Okamoto
: pp. 711-717
Numerical Analysis of Liquefaction in a River Levee on Soft Cohesive Ground
Abstract
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Ryosuke Uzuoka and Keita Semba
: pp. 718-725
Ultimate Response of Superstructure Supported by Spread Foundation During Strong Earthquakes
Abstract
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Shuji Tamura, Amane Kuriki, and Kohji Tokimatsu
: pp. 726-732
Performance of Piled Raft Foundation with Grid-Form Ground Improvement During the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Akihiko Uchida, Kiyoshi Yamashita, and Nobuyuki Odajima
: pp. 733-738
Effects of Horizontal Drainage Layer for Seepage Control on Mitigation of Liquefaction of Levee Body
Abstract
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Akihiro Takahashi

Special Issue on Infectious Disease Control of Natural Disasters

: pp. 739-740
Infectious Disease Control of Natural Disasters
Sumio Shinoda

Large natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis and typhoons often produce many refugees, forcing them to live inconvenient and unsanitary lives in temporary places of refuge. Even if they can remain in their homes, hygienic conditions may be worsened by interrupted electricity, water, fuel and other lifelines.

Winter disasters bring more concerns, such as influenza and cold weather, while those in summer raise problems of diarrhea-related disease.

Two of Japan’s largest recent earthquakes, the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake and the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, did not cause large infectious disease outbreaks thanks to proper countermeasures. Even so, such outbreaks frequently occur worldwide.

One recent example is the 2010 cholera outbreak following an earthquake in Haiti. In an added complication, it is thought that the outbreak was from a foreign source – an Asian epidemic strain of cholera.

Many refugees have resulted from ethnic and tribal conflicts in Africa. In a visit to Kenya as a short-term expert for the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), I observed a cholera outbreak in a Somali refugee camp. Health facilities at the camp were extremely bad, with the occurrence of drought adding to the suffering in these regions.

Many developing countries in tropical and subtropical regions have problems of insufficient food supplies due to recent population growth. Disasters breaking out in these areas leave an unwelcome legacy of undernourishment and malnutrition, especially among young children. In this situation, the number of fatalities due to diarrhea is very high. Such fatalities are fewer in developed countries, but diarrhea in children under 5 years of age in developing countries remains a serious problem. World Health Organization (WHO) statistics published this year show that the global number of deaths in 2010 of children under 5 was some 76 million, 10% of which suffered from diarrhea-related disease. Malaria, pneumonia, premature birth, birth asphyxia and neonatal sepsis are additional causes of these deaths.

This special issue details the countermeasures taken against infectious diseases in recent large disasters.

As stated above, no serious outbreaks of infection were observed in the Great East Japan Earthquake, but damage to a local atomic power plant was extensive, as reported by the mass media. In addition to refugees from the earthquake and tsunami, many residents near the atomic power plant were forced to move out of their homes and towns because of the possible release of radiation, even though their homes had not been destroyed or even damaged.

The lack of serious infectious disease outbreaks were more than made up for, however, by many problems with infectious disease. The subject of infectious disease risk and public health recovery is described by Dr. Hitoshi Oshitani of Tohoku University. Another article covers communicable diseases following the Great Earthquake described by Dr. Kentaro Iwata of Kobe University.

The Great Earthquake and resulting tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia, in December 2005 left more than 2,300,000 victims. Because this happened in a tropical region, public health control, especially food sanitation, was the worst problem. Dr. Nasronudin of Airlangga University in Indonesia communicates his experiences in this situation.

The 2011 Haiti earthquake also involved a tropical region. As a Central American country, Haiti has had no experience with cholera in nearly a century and faces a cholera outbreak after the earthquake. Dr. G. B. Nair a cholera specialist at the Translational Health Science and Technology Institute of India, investigated the situation in Haiti and found that the causative strain was an Asian epidemic cholera. We therefore asked Dr. Nair to write about the Haiti cholera epidemic.

Global microbial culture collection facilities have many microbial stocks that, if somehow released by a disaster, would cause at least two serious problems – one of environmental pollution by pathogenic organisms triggering infectious disease and another of the loss of valuable microbial resources. This makes it vital to maintain safe, secure culture collections against disasters. Dr. Takayuki Ezaki, Gifu University, describes this subject.

Finally, we thank the authors for their contributions and the reviewers for their invaluable comments.

: pp. 741-745
Infectious Disease Risk After the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Satoshi Mimura, Taro Kamigaki, and Hitoshi Oshitani
: pp. 746-753
Communicable Diseases After the Disasters: with the Special Reference to the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Kentaro Iwata, Goh Ohji, Hideaki Oka, Yoshihiro Takayama, Tetsuji Aoyagi, Yoshiaki Gu, Masumitsu Hatta, Koichi Tokuda, and Mitsuo Kaku
: pp. 754-758
Infectious Diseases After Tsunami Aceh (Indonesia) Experience
Abstract
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Nasronudin, Juniastuti, Retno H. Oktamia, and Maria I. Lusida
: pp. 759-767
The Origin of Cholera in Haiti
Abstract
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Daniele Lantagne, G. Balakrish Nair, Claudio F. Lanata, and Alejandro Cravioto
: pp. 768-774
Role of Culture Collections in Disasters
Abstract
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Takayuki Ezaki, Masahiro Hayashi, Jiwei Zhang, Takuya Mizuno, Tatsuya Natori, and Kiyofumi Ohkusu

Regular Papers

: pp. 775-785
Sensitivity Studies on a Punching Wall of IRIS_2010 Benchmark Exercise
Abstract
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Markku Tuomala, Kim Calonius, Juha Kuutti, Arja Saarenheimo, and Pekka Välikangas
: pp. 786-792
Characteristics of the Behaviors to Collect Information from AvailableMedia in the Students of the Universities Located in the Damaged and Non-Damaged Prefectures Around the Period of the 2011 off Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Erina Gyoba
: pp. 793-802
Emergency Management: Building an O-D Ranking Model Using GIS Network Analysis
Abstract
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Carine J. Yi, Roy S. Park, Osamu Murao, and Eiji Okamoto
: pp. 803-809
Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment Anticipating the Earthquake Hazard from Lembang Fault: A Case Study of Bandung Institute of Technology, West Java, Indonesia
Abstract
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Farica Edgina Yosafat, Arif Rohman, Didik Wahju Widjaja, and Irwan Meilano

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Flood Management and Flood Disaster Mitigation Measures

Special Issue on Flood Management and Flood Disaster Mitigation Measures

: p. 533
Flood Management and Flood Disaster Mitigation Measures
Kuniyoshi Takeuchi, Ali Chavoshian, and Shinji Egashira

The 5th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM5) was held on September 27-29, 2011 in Tokyo under the umbrella title “Floods: from risk to opportunity” focused on flood management and disaster mitigation measures in its plenary, oral, and poster sessions. Out of over 250 presented papers, 120 manuscripts – far more than expected – were contributed for post-publication in the Journal of Flood Risk Management, the IAHS Red Book and the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR). Editorial staff members of the JDR, which was independent of ICFM5, attended the conference to survey research activities in related study fields and to announce JDR strategies to participants. The ICHARM scientific committee supervising ICFM5 post-publications is well acquainted with JDR, which is one of the reasons for agreeing on this special issue.

The 13 manuscripts presented for consideration by JDR concern the following topics:

– Flood forecasting

– Basic tools for evaluating inundation flows

– Flood management practices and policies

– Flood plain management

– Relations between human activities and floods

These topics range from novel studies to public statements and have been reviewed as papers, reviews, and survey reports. This resulted in 9 papers recommended for the special issue – 4 topics for papers, 1 topic for review, and 4 topics for reports.

We thank the authors for their contributions and revisions and the reviewers for their invaluable comments. We also thank the ICHARM committee members for introducing authors to special publications for JDR.

: pp. 534-539
Flood Forecasting Module of the Distributed Hydrological Model EasyDHM
Abstract
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Xiaohui Lei, Weihong Liao, Yunzhong Jiang, and Hao Wang
: pp. 540-546
Effective Flood Control Through Integrated and Collaborative Dam Operation at Three Dams in the Upper Nabari River
Abstract
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Takayoshi Matsumura, Hiroshi Kamiya, and Naohiro Yoshida
: pp. 547-553
Approaches for the Restoration of the Environment in Kushiro Wetland Contributing to Flood Risk Control
Abstract
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Hideyuki Miyafuji, Yasuyuki Hirai, and Yuichi Suzuki
: pp. 554-559
Urban Flood Inundation Model for High Density Building Area
Abstract
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Mohammad Farid, Akira Mano, and Keiko Udo
: pp. 560-566
Influence of Detailed Topography when Modeling Flows in Street Junction During Urban Flood
Abstract
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Pierre-Henri Bazin, Anne Bessette, Emmanuel Mignot, André Paquier, and Nicolas Rivière
: pp. 567-572
Flood Risk Assessment in Fujian Province, China
Abstract
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Changzhi Li, Shuaijie Li, and Xiaotao Cheng
: pp. 573-581
Impact of Climate and Land Use Changes on the Flood Hazard of the Middle Brahmaputra Reach, India
Abstract
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Subashisa Dutta and Shyamal Ghosh
: pp. 582-589
Tripod Scheme in Flood Disaster Management in Japan
Abstract
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Hirotada Matsuki
: pp. 590-594
Hydrological Analysis of the Situ Gintung Dam Failure
Abstract
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Joko Sujono

Regular Papers

: pp. 595-603
Flood Risk Communication from the Viewpoint of Disaster Prevention Awareness in an Urban Area of Tokyo, Kita Ward
Abstract
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Chiharu Mizuki
: pp. 604-608
Tsunami Hydrodynamics in the Columbia River
Abstract
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Harry Yeh, Elena Tolkova, David Jay, Stefan Talke, and Hermann Fritz
: pp. 609-618
Study on Vertical Motions by Rocking Responses of Reactor Buildings
Abstract
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Rikiro Kikuchi, Katsuichirou Hijikata, Takayuki Koyanagi, Mitsugu Mashimo, Shinya Tanaka, Atsushi Suzuki, and Yoshinori Mihara
: pp. 619-628
Impact Tests for IRIS_2010 Benchmark Exercise
Abstract
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Ari Vepsä, Arja Saarenheimo, Francois Tarallo, Jean-Mathieu Rambach, and Nebojsa Orbovic
: pp. 629-637
Sensitivity Studies on a Bending Wall of IRIS_2010 Benchmark Exercise
Abstract
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Arja Saarenheimo, Markku Tuomala, Pekka Välikangas, and Ari Vepsä
: pp. 638-644
Seismic Performance of Degraded Shear Walls for Long-Term Compliance Periods
Abstract
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Luis Ibarra, Biswajit Dasgupta, and Kuang-Tsan Chiang
: pp. 645-655
Design Evaluation Method of Steel-Plate Reinforced Concrete Structure Containment Vessel for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor
Abstract
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Tomohiko Yamamoto, Atsushi Katoh, Yoshitaka Chikazawa, and Kazuo Negishi

No.sp

(Aug)

Special Issue on Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster

Special Issue on Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster

: p. 421
Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster
Suminao Murakami

Concerned experts and others from a wide range of fields are required to take part in studies on “social” disaster phenomena such as earthquakes and typhoons causing drastic human and property damage and leaving subsequent social and economic destruction. In 2006, the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) decided to be published as an academic journal in English for global society to help expand research beyond a domestic scope. The March 11, 2011, Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster – in the 6th year of the journal’s publication, has made an impact both domestically and globally due to the unprecedented earthquake and tsunami and resulting radiation leakage at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. JDR will annually publish special issues on the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster beginning in this issue of 2012, for five years, for the purpose of informing, recording and utilizing lessons learned from the disaster. Page charges are in principle free and widespread contributions are welcomed.

I have studied disasters from the viewpoint of a planner. Nobody who is active and living in society is irrelevant to wide-scale events related to such disasters, and I still feel that it is important for people from a variety of fields to visit devastated sites, hear from the people experiencing such disasters and make their own standpoints. In American society, for example, disaster measures against earthquakes and other disasters have been studied involving a wide range of experts and others. After the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake in Kobe, research groups consisting of wide range of experts came to be formed in Japan and environments developed to produce a multidisciplinary journal such as the JDR. The ultimate goal of planned research is human research. A society is needed in which “human power” can be manifested in all aspects such as reviving reconstruction and rehabilitation. This is because contributions by researchers from widespread fields are anticipated in the future.

This special issue is sponsored by following companies. We deeply appreciate their cooperation.

Gold sponsor: KAJIMA CORPORATION

Gold sponsor: MORITA HOLDINGS CORPORATION

Bronze sponsor: NIKKEN SEKKEI

: pp. 422-425
Inevitability and Choice
Abstract
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Katsuki Takiguchi
: pp. 426-431
A Message 15 Days After the 3.11 Earthquake on the Nuclear Accident at Fukushima #1 NPS
Abstract
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Yoichi Fuji-ie
: pp. 432-438
A Study on Community-Based Reconstruction from Nuclear Power Plant Disaster – A Case Study of Minamisoma Ota Area in Fukushima –
Abstract
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Tomoyuki Furutani, Keisuke Uehara, and Jun Murai
: pp. 439-445
JMA’s Tsunami Warning for the 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami Warning Improvement Plan
Abstract
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Tomoaki Ozaki
: pp. 446-457
Tsunami Vertical Evacuation Buildings – Lessons for International Preparedness Following the 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami
Abstract
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Stuart Fraser, Graham S. Leonard, Hitomi Murakami, and Ichiro Matsuo
: pp. 458-467
Evacuation Behaviors in the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Nam-Yi Yun and Masanori Hamada
: pp. 468-475
Dynamic Response of Bottom Water Pressure due to the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Hiroyuki Matsumoto, Shusaku Inoue, and Tatsuo Ohmachi
: pp. 476-484
Deformation of Sandy Beach and Inundation on Iwama-Sanuka Coast in Fukushima Prefecture due to the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami
Abstract
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Takaaki Uda, Kazuya Sakai, Yukiyoshi Hoshigami, and Yasuhito Noshi
: pp. 485-490
Site-Specific Behavior of 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami Influenced by Artificial Changes of Coastal Environments
Abstract
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Chiharu Mizuki and Kazuomi Hirakawa
: pp. 491-499
Damage Assessment on Electric Power Failures During the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake
Abstract
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Gaku Shoji, Dai Takahashi, Takuya Tsukiji, and Satoshi Naba
: pp. 500-510
Proposal on the Effective Use of Relief Helicopters Based on Experience in the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Hiroyuki Nakachi, Norio Maki, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 511-516
Anticipatory and Participatory Governance: Revisiting Technology Assessment on Nuclear Energy in Japan
Abstract
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Go Yoshizawa
: pp. 517-527
Government’s Response to the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
Abstract
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Atsushi Koresawa

No.4

(Jun)

Special Issue on Business Continuity Plan (BCP)

Special Issue on Business Continuity Plan (BCP)

: p. 343
Business Continuity Plan (BCP)
Kenji Watanabe

Among the lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake, there were a large number of new findings, including which preparations functioned as planned and which did not. Now that a year has elapsed since the earthquake disaster, the parties concerned need to reexamine those measures which are yet to be implemented since we should not see the same results after a large scale disaster in the future as those we saw in the past.

In this JDR Special Issue on Business Continuity Plan (BCP), I tried to ask for papers not only from academia but also from business fields to make this issue practical and useful to be leveraged for our next steps in preparing for incoming disasters. As a result, this issue obtains papers from various fields from academia to financial businesses and also with several different approaches which includes actual real case studies.

Many of papers in this issue focus on intangible part of business continuity activities that is different from the traditional disaster management approaches which have mainly focused on tangibles or hardware reinforcement against natural disasters.

Recent wide-area disasters taught us the importance of intangibles and we should start discussions more in details with aspects such as corporate value, emergency transportation & logistics, training & exercises, funding arrangement, and management systems. I hope that discussions and insights in this issue will help our discussions and actions to move forward.

Finally, I really thank the authors’ insightful contributions and the referees’ intensive professional advices to make this JDR Special Issue valuable to our society in preparing for incoming disasters.

: pp. 344-348
Ideal Interoperability of Logistics that Enhance Resilience of Supply Chains Based on PPP (Public-Private Partnership)
Abstract
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Kenji Watanabe
: pp. 349-356
Key Elements of Functional BCP – Post March 11 Survey Review
Abstract
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Shinichi Okabe
: pp. 357-362
BCM Case Study on Financial Companies in Japan: Review of Decision-Making Process to Develop a BCM Helicopter Solution
Abstract
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Yasutake Sayanagi
: pp. 363-367
Survey on the Disaster Preparedness and Business Continuity of Companies in the Great East Japan Earthquake – Improving the Business Value by the Information Sharing and Disclosure of BCPs –
Abstract
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Yoshiki Hiruma and Kentaro Noda
: pp. 368-375
Support Systems to Maintain Building Function Continuity in the Event of a Disaster – A Case Study Introducing the Concept of Rate of Awareness of Important Information in the Central Monitoring Room
Abstract
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Yukihiro Masuda and Koji Akamatsu
: pp. 376-385
Treatment of Unexpected Risk on Business Continuity Management Learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake
Abstract
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Hitoshi Kawaguchi
: pp. 386-391
Business Continuity Planning Status of the Private Sector in the Asia Pacific Region
Abstract
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Takahiro Ono
: pp. 392-407
Form Development for Self-Rating an Organization’s Vulnerability and Resilience to Disruption
Abstract
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Yoshihiro Kohno, Yukihiro Masuda, Hironori Nagahashi, Kazuaki Tanaka, and Kuniyuki Tashiro

No.3

(Apr)

Special Issue on Infectious Diseases of Domestic Animals

Special Issue on Infectious Diseases of Domestic Animals

: p. 251
Infectious Diseases of Domestic Animals
Hiroomi Akashi

The outbreak of Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Miyazaki Prefecture in 2010 has turned out to be the most striking disaster in the history of animal hygiene in Japan, from the points such as the number of the animals culled and buried or the human resources required until the time of termination. Inquiry committees for FMD countermeasures established by Miyazaki Prefecture and by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries have pointed out the various issues in disease control measures taken during the period starting from the outbreak till the termination. As a result, amendments were made to the Act on Domestic Animal Infectious Diseases Control in April of 2011, and in October, to the Standards of Rearing Hygiene Management.

The outbreak of Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Miyazaki Prefecture in 2010 has turned out to be the most striking disaster in the history of animal hygiene in Japan, from the points such as the number of the animals culled and buried or the human resources required until the time of termination. Inquiry committees for FMD countermeasures established by Miyazaki Prefecture and by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries have pointed out the various issues in disease control measures taken during the period starting from the outbreak till the termination. As a result, amendments were made to the Act on Domestic Animal Infectious Diseases Control in April of 2011, and in October, to the Standards of Rearing Hygiene Management.

Diseases that cause damage to domestic animals including FMD are presented in this special issue. I hope that this special issue will contribute to the betterment of animal hygiene and furthermore to the enhancement of dietary life.

Finally, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the authors and reviewers for their great contributions to this issue.

: pp. 252-257
The 2010 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreakin Miyazaki Prefecture
Abstract
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Hiroomi Akashi
: pp. 258-263
Mechanism of FMD Outbreaks and its Control in Asian Region
Abstract
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Kenichi Sakamoto
: pp. 264-273
Disinfection Against the Outbreaks of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD)
Abstract
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Junsuke Shirai
: pp. 274-280
Pandemic Influenza
Abstract
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Maria Eugenia Vasquez Manriquez, Kentaro Iwata, Motoko Tanaka, and Kyoko Shinya
: pp. 281-288
Equine Influenza: Prevention and Control
Abstract
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Takashi Yamanaka, Takashi Kondo, and Tomio Matsumura
: pp. 289-296
Viral Infectious Diseases in Wild Animals in Japan
Abstract
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Hiroshi Shimoda, Yumiko Nagao, Masayuki Shimojima, and Ken Maeda
: pp. 297-302
Bovine Coronavirus Infection: Pathology and Interspecies Transmission
Abstract
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Toru Kanno
: pp. 303-312
Streptococcus suis: An Emerging Biothreat
Abstract
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Tsutomu Sekizaki
: pp. 313-318
Mouse Model of Abortion Induced by Brucella abortus Infection
Abstract
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Masahisa Watarai
: pp. 319-323
Cutaneous Papillomatosis in Cattle
Abstract
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Shinichi Hatama
: pp. 324-331
Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Japan: Outbreaks, Control Measures, and Roles of Wild Birds
Abstract
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Kenji Tsukamoto

No.2

(Feb)

Crisis Management and Recovery Following Tokyo Metropolitan Near Field Earthquake Disaster

Crisis Management and Recovery Following Tokyo Metropolitan Near Field Earthquake Disaster

: pp. 125-126
Crisis Management and Recovery Following Tokyo Metropolitan Near Field Earthquake Disaster
Haruo Hayashi, Keiko Tamura, and Munenari Inoguchi

It is expected that Tokyo Metropolitan area and her vicinity may be jolted by a devastating earthquake with a 70% chance for the next 30 years. The worstcase scenario for Tokyo Metropolitan earthquake is a M7.3 earthquake beneath northern Tokyo Bay. According to the Central Disaster Prevention Council, A total of 12,000 people will be dead and economic losses will exceed 112 trillion yen. Areas with a seismic intensity of JMA 6 – and more will include Tokyo, Chiba, Saitama, and Kanagawa, resulting in 25 million victims – 20% of Japan’s total population. No country has not experienced such a large-scale earthquake in recorded history, but it does not mean such a disaster will not occur. In order to cope with such an unprecedented disaster, we must face and solve a lot of new problems in addition to all of existing problems appeared in the past disasters. Thus it is mandatory to take a holistic approach to implement effectively and seamlessly emergency response, relief, and long-term recovery.

With the severity of possible consequences due to this earthquake, a special project, entitled as “Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area” (2007-2011), is commissioned by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan (MEXT), This special project consists of three subprojects; Seismology, Earthquake Engineering, and Crisis Management and Recovery. This subproject considers Tokyo Metropolitan Earthquake as a national crisis occurred in the Tokyo metropolitan area. All the available knowledge of disaster researchers should be gathered from nationwide, including both emergency response and long-term recovery to minimize damage and losses. This project examines measures for improving the capacity for the people from disaster management organizations to react to crisis and help rebuilding life recovery of disaster victims. An information-sharing platform will be proposed to comprehensively manage individual disaster response and recovery measures. “Training and exercise systems” will be introduced to empower local capacity to mitigate and recover from disaster by integrating all of the project achievements among stakeholders. The final goal of this project is to make ourselves prepared for help the anticipated 25 million victims at most due to Tokyo Metropolitan earthquake.

In this issue of JDR, we will introduce 10 papers from the subproject on Crisis Management and Recovery as a part of the achievements of this subproject for the last five years.

: pp. 127-134
Analysis of Disaster Victims’ Decision-Making in the Process of Reconstruction Housing
Abstract
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Kishie Shigekawa, Satoshi Tanaka, and Masasuke Takashima
: pp. 135-146
Examining the Scheme for Damage Inspection of Non-Wooden Apartment Buildings for Issuing Disaster Victim Certificates
Abstract
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Kaoru Mizukoshi, Yosuke Nakajima, Yoe Masuzawa, Satoshi Tanaka, and Kishie Shigekawa
: pp. 147-159
Analysis of Description of Local Disaster Management Plan for Smooth and Effective Wide-Area Support System During Large-Scale Disaster
Abstract
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Muneyoshi Numada, Shinya Kondo, Masashi Inoue, and Kimiro Meguro
: pp. 160-172
Implementation of Demonstration of Information Linkage Supposing the Tokyo Metropolitan Near Field Earthquake Disaster
Abstract
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Yasunori Hada, Shinya Kondo, Kimiro Meguro, Miho Ohara,Shinsaku Zama, Makoto Endo, Keiji Kobayashi, Takeyasu Suzuki, Itsuki Noda, Hiroki Shimora, Ikuo Takeuchi, Satoshi Kobayashi, and Jumpei Arakawa
: pp. 173-183
Function of Emergency Road Networks During the Post-Earthquake Process of Lifeline Systems Restoration
Abstract
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Gaku Shoji and Ayumi Toyota
: pp. 184-189
Improvement of Local Capability Under Lifeline Disruptions by Construction of Distributed Self-Sustaining Zone – Based on Research of Disaster Base Hospitals in Tokyo Capital Area
Abstract
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Keiko Inagaki and Satoru Sadohara
: pp. 190-202
A Basic Study of Open Space Information as Social Infrastructure for Wide-Range Cooperation in Large-Scale Seismic Disaster
Abstract
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Takashi Furuya, Munenari Inoguchi, Go Urakawa, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 203-214
Economic Recovery Scenario Planning for a Tokyo Inland Earthquake
Abstract
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Shingo Nagamatsu and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 215-226
Ten Years of Pre-Disaster Community Development for Post-Disaster Recovery in Tokyo
Abstract
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Taro Ichiko
: pp. 227-238
How to Optimize the Urban Recovery After Earthquake Disaster – Preparedness for Recovery from the Next Tokyo Earthquake –
Abstract
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Itsuki Nakabayashi

No.1

(Jan)

Multi-disciplinary Hazard Reduction from Earthquakes and Volcanoes in Indonesia

Multi-disciplinary Hazard Reduction from Earthquakes and Volcanoes in Indonesia

: p. 3
Multi-disciplinary Hazard Reduction from Earthquakes and Volcanoes in Indonesia
Kenji Satake and Yujiro Ogawa

Natural disasters and their mitigation are global issues, especially in Asian countries, which have suffered from such geohazards as earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions and such hydrometeorological hazards as typhoons, cyclones, storm surges, and floods.

Research on natural hazards and disasters is multidisciplinary. Scientists from a wide variety of disciplines study hazards, their causes, their mechanisms, and prediction. Engineers study infrastructures and measures to reduce vulnerability. Social and humanitarian scientists study cultural and societal aspects of disasters. Educators study effective ways to raise people’s awareness and action. In addition to such research activities, practitioners work to implement the results of scientific research into practical policymaking.

This special issue of JDR contains 12 papers on multidisciplinary studies concerning geohazards in Indonesia taken from a Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) project supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). SATREPS projects focus on both the scientific aspect, namely, acquiring new knowledge, and the Official Development Aids (ODA) aspect, namely, implementing such knowledge in societal applications.

Following the first review article, which is a project overview, the next four papers report findings on natural hazards – the slip rate on the Lembang fault in Java, tsunami simulation for Java’s Palabuhanratu, the Sinabung volcano eruption in Sumatra, and methods of predicting and evaluating eruptions. One paper reports engineering studies on tsunami disaster mitigation in Padang city and two social science papers present hazards in the contexts of communities and human mobility. Two papers on disaster education cover disaster education development since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the use of tsunami simulation in disaster education. The last research paper and review article deal with policymaking related to the 2010 Mentawai and 2011 Japan tsunamis, respectively.

All of these papers, including the review articles, have been peer-reviewed by two nonproject reviewers. We thank the authors for their timely contributions and revisions, and the reviewers for their invaluable and wide-ranging comments.

: pp. 4-11
Multi-Disciplinary Hazard Reduction from Earthquakes and Volcanoes in Indonesia
Abstract
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Kenji Satake and Hery Harjono
: pp. 12-18
Slip Rate Estimation of the Lembang Fault West Java from Geodetic Observation
Abstract
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Irwan Meilano, Hasanuddin Z. Abidin, Heri Andreas, Irwan Gumilar, Dina Sarsito, Rahma Hanifa, Rino, Hery Harjono, Teruyuki Kato, Fumiaki Kimata, and Yoichi Fukuda
: pp. 19-25
Tsunami Hazard Mitigation at Palabuhanratu, Indonesia
Abstract
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Yuichiro Tanioka, Hamzah Latief, Haris Sunendar, Aditya Riadi Gusman, and Shunichi Koshimura
: pp. 26-36
Methods for Eruption Prediction and Hazard Evaluation at Indonesian Volcanoes
Abstract
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Masato Iguchi, Surono, Takeshi Nishimura, Muhamad Hendrasto, Umar Rosadi, Takahiro Ohkura, Hetty Triastuty, Ahmad Basuki, Agoes Loeqman, Sukir Maryanto, Kazuhiro Ishihara, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Setsuya Nakada, and Natsumi Hokanishi
: pp. 37-47
Evaluation of Volcanic Activity at Sinabung Volcano, After More Than 400 Years of Quiet
Abstract
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Muhamad Hendrasto, Surono, Agus Budianto, Kristianto, Hetty Triastuty, Nia Haerani, Ahmad Basuki, Yasa Suparman, Sofyan Primulyana, Oktory Prambada, Agoes Loeqman, Novianti Indrastuti, Aditya Sebastian Andreas, Umar Rosadi, Sucahyo Adi, Masato Iguchi, Takahiro Ohkura, Setsuya Nakada, and Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto
: pp. 48-64
Tsunami Disaster Mitigation by Integrating Comprehensive Countermeasures in Padang City, Indonesia
Abstract
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Fumihiko Imamura, Abdul Muhari, Erick Mas, Mulyo Harris Pradono, Joachim Post, and Megumi Sugimoto
: pp. 65-74
Social Flux and Disaster Management: An Essay on the Construction of an Indonesian Model for Disaster Management and Reconstruction
Abstract
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Yoshimi Nishi and Hiroyuki Yamamoto
: pp. 75-82
Striving to Reduce Disaster Risk: Vulnerable Communities with Low Levels of Preparedness in Indonesia
Abstract
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Deny Hidayati
: pp. 83-91
Disaster Education in Indonesia: Learning How It Works from Six Years of Experience After Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004
Abstract
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Irina Rafliana
: pp. 92-101
Tsunami Evacuation Simulation for Disaster Education and City Planning
Abstract
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Yozo Goto, Muzailin Affan, Agussabti, Yudha Nurdin, Diyah K. Yuliana, and Ardiansyah
: pp. 102-106
The Influence of Mentawai Tsunami to Public Policy on Tsunami Warning in Indonesia
Abstract
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Pariatmono
: pp. 107-115
Main Features of Government’s Initial Response to the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
Abstract
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Atsushi Koresawa

Vol.6 (2011)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on Fire and Emergency Evacuation in a High-rise Building

Special Issue on Fire and Emergency Evacuation in a High-rise Building

: pp. 541-550
Concepts of Fire Safety Provisions of Means of Escape andEvacuation Safety Plan in High-Rise Building
Abstract
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Ichiro Hagiwara
: pp. 551-557
Smoke Control System for High-Rise Buildings in Japan
Abstract
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Shuji Moriyama
: pp. 558-567
Fire Resistive Design for Preventing Upward Fire Spread
Abstract
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Kenichi Ikeda
: pp. 568-580
Adequacy of Safe Egress Design Codes for Supertall Buildings
Abstract
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Edgar C. L. Pang and Wan-Ki Chow
: pp. 581-590
A Research of the Elevator Evacuation Performance and Strategies for Taipei 101 Financial Center
Abstract
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Shen-Wen Chien and Wei-Jou Wen
: pp. 591-599
Study on Transportation Efficiency of Evacuation Using Elevators in Comparison with Evacuation Using Stairsin a High-Rise Building – Is Use of Elevator in Evacuation Really Effective for General People? –
Abstract
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Ai Sekizawa and Shinji Nakahama
: pp. 600-609
Design of Evacuation Systems for Elevator Evacuation in High-Rise Buildings
Abstract
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Daniel Nilsson and Axel Jönsson
: pp. 610-619
Surveys and Analyses on Human Behavior in the New York World Trade Center Disasters in 1993 and 2001
Abstract
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Yoshiyuki Yoshida
: pp. 620-628
How did People Respond and Evacuate in WTC Twin Towers in 2001?
Abstract
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Rita F. Fahy
: pp. 629-643
Fire and Smoke Protection Measures for High-Rise Buildings
Abstract
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Suminao Murakami and Yoshiteru Murosaki

Regular Papers

: pp. 645-667
Seismic Isolation with No Strain Energy – Research on New Seismic Isolation System with No Resonance Characteristics –
Abstract
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Mitsuo Miyazaki, Yukihiro Nishimura, and Tadashi Mizue
: pp. 668-689
Development of the EDR-Spring Element Using Foamed Polymer Materials and the Design of NSE-Isolated Buildings Using EDR-Spring Elements
Abstract
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Mitsuo Miyazaki and Yukihiro Nishimura

No.5

(Oct)

Managing Catastrophic Technological Risks and Role of Technology Assessment (TA) in the Post 3/11 Society

Managing Catastrophic Technological Risks and Role of Technology Assessment (TA) in the Post 3/11 Society

: pp. 473-475
Managing Catastrophic Technological Risks and Role of Technology Assessment (TA) in the Post 3/11 Society
Tatsujiro Suzuki and Go Yoshizawa

The nuclear accident at Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCo)’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 11, 2011, triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent Tsunami, is probably the worst “catastrophic technological risk” ever experienced by Japan. Whether this serious accident could have been prevented or managed better is the key question that we need to pursue. Technology Assessment (TA), which is intended to help decision making by assessing possible societal impacts of particular technology, can play significant role in managing catastrophic technological risks by providing an objective assessment of technological risks before it happens, while it is happening and even after the accident. In this special issue on TA, we are fortunate to have papers and reviews from both distinguished experts as well as young scholars. The variety of the subject is also very useful to see how TA can be applied under the different situations. In particular, in the post 3.11 society, we believe it is a good occasion to consider institutionalization of TA in Japan.

: pp. 476-481
Current Situation of Synthetic Biology in Japan
Abstract
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Yusuke Mori and Go Yoshizawa
: pp. 482-485
The Macondo Oil Field Disaster
Abstract
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Michael C. Lynch
: pp. 486-497
Green Revolution: Pathways to Food Security in an Era of Climate Variability and Change?
Abstract
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Netra Chhetri and Pashupati Chaudhary
: pp. 498-505
Internal Security Issues Related to Automatic System Malfunction and a Model to Explain Foresight of Experts and Non-Experts
Abstract
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Soichiro Morishita, and Hiroshi Yokoi
: pp. 506-513
Approach to Environmental, Health and Safety Issues of Nanotechnology in Japan
Abstract
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Masahiro Takemura, Go Yoshizawa, and Tatsujiro Suzuki
: pp. 514-521
Replicating GM Viruses in Cancer Therapy; A Conflict of Emotions?
Abstract
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Ruth Mampuys and Sabine Roeser
: pp. 522-527
Technology Assessment in the EU Institutions
Abstract
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Michael D. Rogers

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Understanding Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases
News & Communications

Special Issue on Understanding Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases

: p. 371
Understanding Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases
Fumiko Kasuga

Recent developments in medicine and anti-microbial treatment based on intensive research on basic microbiology have successfully been controlling many infectious diseases to be nonfatal. As stated by Dr. Nobuhiko Okabe in the first section of this issue, emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases still threaten human lives and health both in developing and industrialized countries. A multiprefectural outbreak of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O111 and O157 due to raw beef consumption took the lives of victims, including young children, earlier this year in Japan, following which people worldwide were panicked by news from Europe of a huge outbreak of EHEC O104. Infectious diseases result from interaction between pathogens and humans including our behaviors.

The Journal of Disaster Research has already drawn readers’ attention to infectious diseases in its special issue on “Our Social Activities Are Always Related to Outbreaks of Infectious Diseases,” with Guest Editor Dr. Masayuki Saijo in JDR Vol.4, No.5, October, 2009. That issue reviewed the background behind infectious disease emergence and reemergence using examples of viral diseases that could cause serious public health concerns, and emphasized the need for preparedness and responses, including against bioterrorism.

The present issue again reminds readers of the threat of infectious diseases by demonstrating bacterial and viral infections, focusing more on basic knowledge about these pathogens. Disease history, and epidemiology and the microbiological nature of pathogens and infection pathways are summarized. Treatment, vaccination and other control measures, and law and other social systems for controlling disease are also reviewed.

We believe that a better understanding of pathogens will enable society to build better strategies for overcoming problems with emerging and reemerging infectious diseases, such as appropriate preventive measures, treatment and control for preventing outbreaks from expanding. We also hope that such considerations are also useful to disaster control experts in other areas.

I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the authors and reviewers for their great contributions to this issue, and to the Editorial Board and the Secretariat of the Journal of Disaster Research for their continuous encouragement and assistance.

: pp. 372-380
Understanding of Emerging and Re-Emerging Diseases (EID and REID)
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Nobuhiko Okabe
: pp. 381-389
Ebola and Marburg Viruses
Abstract
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Eri Nakayama and Ayato Takada
: pp. 390-397
Henipavirus Infections – An Expanding Zoonosis from Fruit Bats
Abstract
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Chieko Kai and Misako Yoneda
: pp. 398-403
Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza
Abstract
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Yasuo Suzuki
: pp. 404-412
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
Abstract
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Akihiko Kawana
: pp. 413-420
West Nile Virus : Understanding its Past, Present, and Future
Abstract
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Yusuke Sayama and Tetsuya Mizutani
: pp. 421-425
Strategy for Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission
Abstract
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Saori Matsuoka and Teturo Matano
: pp. 426-434
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli – Its Control from a Viewpoint of Food Safety –
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Hiroshi Asakura, Yoshika Momose, and Fumiko Kasuga
: pp. 435-442
Legionella Pneumonia
Abstract
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Kazuhiro Tateda
: pp. 443-450
Global Threats and the Control of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
Abstract
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Kazuo Kobayashi, Manabu Ato, and Sohkichi Matsumoto

Regular Papers

: pp. 451-458
New Approaches for Tackling Foodborne Infections
Abstract
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Yuko Kumagai, Mamoru Noda, and Fumiko Kasuga

News & Communications

: pp. 459-466
Nuclear Accidents and Leakage of Radioactive Materials at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
Abstract
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Editorial Office

No.3

(Jun)

Regular papers

Regular Papers

: pp. 281-298
A Study on the Response Instability of Seismically Isolated Structures Affected by Ground Inclination During Earthquakes Part 1 : Estimation of Ground Inclination During Earthquakes and the Influence of Static Ground Inclination
Abstract
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Mitsuo Miyazaki and Yukihiro Nishimura
: pp. 299-312
A Study on the Response Instability of Seismically Isolated Structures Affected by Ground Inclination During Earthquakes Part 2 : Influence of Dynamic Ground Inclination
Abstract
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Mitsuo Miyazaki and Yukihiro Nishimura
: pp. 313-320
Prospects of Debris Flow Studies from Constitutive Relations to Governing Equations
Abstract
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Shinji Egashira
: pp. 321-330
Recent Anomalous Lightning Occurrences in Alaska – the Case of June 2005 –
Abstract
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Murad Ahmed Farukh, Hiroshi Hayasaka, and Keiji Kimura
: pp. 331-342
Disasters, Diasporas and Host Communities: Insights in the Aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake
Abstract
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Ann-Margaret Esnard and Alka Sapat
: pp. 343-355
Characterization of Lightning Occurrence in Alaska Using Various Weather Indices for Lightning Forecasting
Abstract
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Murad Ahmed Farukh, Hiroshi Hayasaka, and Keiji Kimura

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on Safety Science: Comprehensive Approach to Social Disasters and Natural Disasters

Special Issue on Safety Science: Comprehensive Approach to Social Disasters and Natural Disasters

: p. 175
Safety Science: Comprehensive Approach to Social Disasters and Natural Disasters
Yoshiaki Kawata

In April 2010, the new Kansai University Safety Science Faculty started with 16 professors, to be increased to 25 from April 2011. Just half are social science researchers and the others natural science researchers. With natural disasters and accidents in Japan growing increasingly complex, conventional analysis on how to reduce disaster damage and avoid accidents has become increasingly inadequate. We need an interdisciplinary approach to solve problems underlying cooperative research.

A representative disaster is the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji (Kobe) earthquake, which killed 6,434 people and injured 40,000. It generated economic losses of $102.5 billion, 2.5% of Japan’s GDP at the time.

A representative accident is the 2007 Amagasaki JR Fukuchiyama Line rail crash, which killed 107, including the driver, and injured 562. The direct cause of the accident was speeding – the speed limit on the curve where the train left the tracks was 70 km/h, but the train was moving at 116 km/h. The most important indirect reason was the delayed implementation of a new ATS that should have been put in place from the viewpoint of cost management. Japan Transport Safety Board (JTSB) functions will be improved as a result of this accident. In the US, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) operates independent of US government agencies – a trend expected to be followed by the JTSB.

Both provided many potentially valuable disaster lessons, some of which this journal introduces. Other risk-related topics in this volume include tsunami information systems, information law, disaster education, and mental health and psychological approaches to the behavior of young people in the face of disaster, analyzed by our faculty members based on original viewpoints. Effort on these researches has to be continued to improve “Safety Science Study” and promote following social action to improve our social structure toward a safe and secure society.

We thank the authors for their earnest contributions and the reviewers for their invaluable advice on improving the quality of this special issue of JDR.

: pp. 176-184
Downfall of Tokyo due to Devastating Compound Disaster
Abstract
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Yoshiaki Kawata
: pp. 185-192
Transport Accident Investigation Status and Issues
Abstract
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Seiji Abe
: pp. 193-203
Disaster Prevention in Industrial Society – Principal Features of Disaster
Abstract
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Mamoru Ozawa and Yoji Shibutani
: pp. 204-211
Mental Health of Managers of Small and Medium Enterprises as Seen from the Viewpoint of Risk Management
Abstract
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Shin-ya Kaneko, Hiroki Ogyu, Olivier Torres, and Katsuyuki Kamei
: pp. 212-218
Verification of Disaster Management Information on the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Using Virtual Tsunami Warning System
Abstract
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Tomoyuki Takahashi and Tomohiro Konuma
: pp. 219-229
Affect Heuristic with “Good-Bad” Criterion and Linguistic Representation in Risk Judgments
Abstract
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Shoji Tsuchida
: pp. 230-235
Comparison of International and Domestic Methods of Providing Housing After Disasters
Abstract
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Kenji Koshiyama
: pp. 236-243
Logic of and Systems for Volunteer Disaster Relief Activities in Japan: Current Situations and Challenges 15 Years After the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake
Abstract
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Mashiho Suga
: pp. 244-252
Problems and Recommendations on Current Information Legislation in Japan
Abstract
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Kazuhiko Takano
: pp. 253-257
Changes in Labor Accident Risk with Aging
Abstract
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Takahiro Nakamura, Motoya Takagi, and Shinnosuke Usui
: pp. 258-270
Participatory Disaster Management Learning Built on the Theory of Legitimate Peripheral Participation
Abstract
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Hideyuki Shiroshita and Katsuya Yamori

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Protecting Cultural Heritage and Historic Cities from Disasters

Special Issue on Protecting Cultural Heritage and Historic Cities from Disasters

: p. 3
Protecting Cultural Heritage and Historic Cities from Disasters
Kazuyuki Izuno and Takeyuki Okubo

Natural disasters have damaged or destroyed many invaluable cultural heritages. How to mitigate these losses, however, is difficult question. If we cannot save human lives, of course we cannot save cultural heritages from disasters. This requires more sophisticated countermeasures than conventional disaster reduction methodologies. This special issue of JDR provides many examples of such mitigation in historical cities which have expanded with cultural heritages as nuclei.

Cultural heritage disaster mitigation lies somewhere between the fields of cultural preservation and the disaster mitigation engineering. The first two review papers focus on the importance of protecting cultural heritage from natural disasters and the history of this issue from the viewpoints of both engineering and humanities.

Twelve papers discuss engineering problems and the planning of cultural heritages preservation, cover issues such as the seismic performance of traditional wooden structures, the vulnerability of historical masonry structures, disaster reduction in slope failures around cultural heritages, disaster risk analysis at historical cities, fire prevention in historical cities, and urban planning taking cultural heritage into consideration.

This issue closes with a tutorial paper showing the techniques and basics of cultural heritage disaster mitigation. It serves as a practical handbook on mitigating disasters surrounding cultural heritages and historical cities. We expect contributors to this field to increase in the near future due to the importance and urgency of cultural heritage disaster mitigation.

We thank the authors for their earnest contributions and the reviewers for their invaluable advice on improving the quality of this special issue of JDR.

: pp. 4-10
Protection of Cultural Heritage from Post-Earthquake Fire
Abstract
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Kenzo Toki
: pp. 11-17
Cultural Heritage Disaster Management Research in the Human Sciences
Abstract
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Akihisa Yoshikoshi
: pp. 18-25
Earthquake Response Analysis of Japanese Traditional Wooden Structures Considering Member Aging
Abstract
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Yu Ooka, Kazuyuki Izuno, and Kenzo Toki
: pp. 26-35
Dynamic Characteristic Investigation of a Historical Masonry Building and Surrounding Ground in Kathmandu
Abstract
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Hari Ram Parajuli, Junji Kiyono, Masatoshi Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki Suzuki, Hisashi Umemura, Hitoshi Taniguchi, Kenzo Toki, Aiko Furukawa, and Prem Nath Maskey
: pp. 36-43
Finite Element Modeling of Cyclic Out-of-Plane Response of Masonry Walls Retrofitted by Inserting Inclined Stainless Steel Bars
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Kshitij C. Shrestha, Takuya Nagae, and Yoshikazu Araki
: pp. 44-50
Nonlinear Behavior of Masonry Arch Bridge Under Ground Deformation
Abstract
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Yusuke Kishi, Katsuyoshi Nozaka, and Kazuyuki Izuno
: pp. 51-69
Proposal of a Numerical Simulation Method for Elastic, Failure and Collapse Behaviors of Structures and its Application to Seismic Response Analysis of Masonry Walls
Abstract
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Aiko Furukawa, Junji Kiyono, and Kenzo Toki
: pp. 70-79
Slope Monitoring System at a Slope Behind an Important Cultural Asset
Abstract
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Kazunari Sako, Ryoichi Fukagawa, and Tomoaki Satomi
: pp. 80-87
Hydrological Environment in Subsurface Steep Slope – Groundwater Flow Passageway on Slope Behind Kiyomizudera –
Abstract
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Junko Nakaya, Kazunari Sako, Shunsuke Mitsutani, and Ryoichi Fukagawa
: pp. 88-95
Cultural Heritage Sites in Shiga Prefecture in Danger of Natural Disasters
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Yuko Ishida, Ryoichi Fukagawa, Kazunari Sako, Ikuo Yasukawa, and Koji Ikeda
: pp. 96-108
The Meaning of “Fuchi” and the Scenic Landscape Role in Historic Kyoto’s Disaster Mitigation – “Fuchi” Use Until Scenic Landscape Setup Under the Old City Planning Act and Scenic Landscape Regulation Management in Kyoto –
Abstract
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Nobuo Fukushima, Naoko Itaya, Kanefusa Masuda, Takeyuki Okubo, and Masafumi Yamasaki
: pp. 109-118
Survey Analysis of Wooded Areas Around Temples and Former Samurai Residences in Urban Areas – Their Shapes and Sizes Seen from Their Potential Function as Firebreak Belts
Abstract
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Masahiko Takamatsu and Takeyuki Okubo
: pp. 119-131
Study on Disaster Risk Assessment of Cultural Heritage and Road Network Improvement in Historical City
Abstract
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Yoongho Ahn, Hiroshi Tsukaguchi, Keiichi Ogawa, and Kota Tanaka
: pp. 132-141
Effective Planning of Road Monitoring Systems for Cultural Heritage Disaster Mitigation
Abstract
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Keiichi Ogawa, Hiroshi Tsukaguchi, Yoongho Ahn, and Makoto Kawai
: pp. 142-153
Handbook of Countermeasures to Protect Cultural Heritages Located in Foothills from Natural Disasters
Abstract
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Takeyuki Okubo and Kazuyuki Izuno

Regular Papers

: pp. 155-164
AREVA’s Fatigue Concept – An Integrated and Multidisciplinary Approach to the Fatigue Assessment of NPP Components
Abstract
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Jürgen Rudolph, Steffen Bergholz, Benedikt Heinz, and Nikolaus Wirtz

Vol.5 (2010)

No.6

(Dec)

Special Issue on ICT Based Disaster Resilient Society

Special Issue on ICT Based Disaster Resilient Society

: pp. 619-621
ICT Based Disaster Resilient Society
Haruo Hayashi and Mitsuhiro Higashida

This special issue on ICT Based Disaster Resilient Society features ten articles resulting from a collaborative research project on natural disaster management conducted by the Kyoto University Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI) researchers and information and communication technology (ICT) experts from Nippon Telegram and Telegraph Co. Ltd (NTT). For the last two years, they have been studying on how to make society more disaster resilient through proper ICT use focusing on cloud computing, the 20th century’s greatest invention.

In part of a formal research partnership agreement signed in 2005, Kyoto University and NTT have been promoting new research in disaster management. The first two years showed with little concrete achievement beyond implementing one small research project – not exactly what the agreement envisioned.

In 2008, volunteers from Kyoto University and NTT meeting to determine the reason found a tactical mistake – starting by picking projects collaboratively assuming that DPRI and NTT’s disaster management research section shared the same vision and understanding of disaster management. Fundamental differences in research focus also raised problems in finding suitable collaborative research activities.

Briefly, at least three tiers existed for promoting ICT based disaster resilient society: 1) the ICT system infrastructure, 2) the operating system, and 3) individual applications in making society more disaster resilient. NTT was focusing on the first two tiers and DPRI on the last top tier. With this common understanding clarified, collaborative research was set in 2008 on ICT Based Disaster Resilient Society to formulate common ground between the two groups of researchers sharing a common operational picture. One result was a 2009 book from Nikkei BP Publications disseminating to the general public what disaster resilient society looks like, what can be done, and how to do it.

This special issue goes one step further by delivering these research efforts to a worldwide audience.

The first three articles, from the NTT group, describe the ICT basis for making society more disaster resilient, focusing on recent cloud computing advances as the projected venue for disaster management information systems. In article 1, Iwatsuki et al. introduce the autonomous, scattered, but coordinated network concept in a brief history of “Realization of Resilient Society with Information Technology Revolution.” Article 2 has Maeda et al. explained how the ICT system infrastructure, the next-generation network (NGN), provides better disaster management services in “Next Generation ICT Services Underlying the Resilient Society.” In article 3, Higashida et al. detail how organizational structures and information processing systems operate and are improved continuously through the NGN-based ICT infrastructure in “Risk Management and Intelligence Management During Emergency.”

Six articles, from the DPRI group, deal with how ICT based information systems help calculate different damage due to different natural hazards, help strategically in compiling disaster management planning, and help implement effective emergency response and recovery. Kamai proposes how local communities can use land-slide databases offered through cloud computing in “Neural Network-Based Risk Assessment of Artificial Fill Slope in Residential Urban Region.” Fukuoka introduces an attempt to set up worldwide landslide databases in “Application of ICT to Contribution to Resilient Society Against Landslides.” Kobayashi et al. analyze the relationship between flooding and economic loss using detailed numerical simulation in “Development of a Framework for the Flood Economic Risk Assessment Using Vector GIS Data.” Chen et al. estimate possible impact of the Tokai-Tonakai-Nankai earthquake predicted in the 2030s taking into account Japan’s dwindling population from a disaster planning perspective in “Adapting the Demographic Transition in Preparation for the Tokai-Tonankai-Nankai Earthquake.”

One objective of ICT based information infrastructures is to help society recover quickly from disaster impact through minimal damage and loss. Hatayama et al. introduce two risk-adaptive regional management information system (RARMIS) concept applications in “Implementation Technology for a Disaster Response Support System for Local Government.” Urakawa et al. introduce elaborated ICT based life recovery for disaster victims implemented in Kashiwazaki City, devastated by the 2007 Niigata Chuetsu-oki earthquake, in “Building Comprehensive Disaster Victim Support System.”

The last article, “Risk Management for Hospitals Using the Incident Report,” reports wider collaborative research covering risk areas outside of natural hazards and the formulation of a research group going beyond DPRI. Takeda et al. introduce an ICT based system to help risk managers at Kyoto University Hospital by automatically analyzing medical incident reports.

We editors would like to sincerely thank the Kyoto University and NTT collaborative researchers on ICT Based Disaster Resilient Society for their contribution and support. We would like to note with sincere appreciation that this publication is made possible in part by the support from “Special Project for Metropolitan Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area (2007-2011)” by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan (MEXT). We also thank Wakai of Fuji Technology Press Ltd. for his dedicated compilation of this special issue.

: pp. 622-626
Realization of Resilient Society with Information Technology Revolution
Abstract
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Katsumi Iwatsuki and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 627-635
Next Generation ICT Services Underlying the Resilient Society
Abstract
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Yuji Maeda, Mitsuhiro Higashida, Katsumi Iwatsuki, Takao Handa, Yoichi Kihara, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 636-641
Risk Management and Intelligence Management During Emergency
Abstract
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Mitsuhiro Higashida, Yuji Maeda, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 642-649
Neural Network-Based Risk Assessment of Artificial Fill Slope in Residential Urban Region
Abstract
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Toshitaka Kamai
: pp. 650-656
Application of ICT to Contribution to Resilient Society Against Landslides
Abstract
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Hiroshi Fukuoka
: pp. 657-665
Development of a Framework for the Flood Economic Risk Assessment Using Vector GIS Data
Abstract
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Kenichiro Kobayashi, Kaoru Takara, Mitsugu Funada, and Yukiko Takeuchi
: pp. 666-676
Adapting the Demographic Transition in Preparation for the Tokai-Tonankai-Nankai Earthquake
Abstract
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Haili Chen, Norio Maki, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 677-686
Implementation Technology for a Disaster Response Support System for Local Government
Abstract
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Michinori Hatayama and Shigeru Kakumoto
: pp. 687-696
Building Comprehensive Disaster Victim Support System
Abstract
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Go Urakawa, Haruo Hayashi, Keiko Tamura, Munenari Inoguchi, Kei Horie, Mitsuhiro Higashida, and Ryota Hamamoto
: pp. 697-705
Risk Management for Hospitals Using the Incident Report
Abstract
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Yurie Takeda, Mitsuhiro Higashida, Yoshimasa Nagao, Manabu Yotsubashi, Shosuke Sato, and Haruo Hayashi

Regular Papers

: pp. 707-711
OECD/NEA Activities to Support Long Term Operation
Abstract
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Andrei Blahoianu and Alejandro Huerta
: pp. 712-719
Accidental Drop Load Effects on Buried Structures
Abstract
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Mehdi S. Zarghamee and Keng-Wit Lim

No.5

(Oct)

Special Issue on Building Local Capacity for Long-term Disaster Resilience Part 2

Special Issue on Building Local Capacity for Long-term Disaster Resilience Part 2

: pp. 487-493
Toward an Enhanced Concept of Disaster Resilience: A Commentary on Behalf of the Editorial Committee
William Siembieda

1. Introduction
This Special Issue (Part 2) expands upon the theme “Building Local Capacity for Long-term Disaster Resilience” presented in Special Issue Part 1 (JDR Volume 5, Number 2, April 2010) by examining the evolving concept of disaster resilience and providing additional reflections upon various aspects of its meaning. Part 1 provided a mixed set of examples of resiliency efforts, ranging from administrative challenges of integrating resilience into recovery to the analysis of hazard mitigation plans directed toward guiding local capability for developing resiliency. Resilience was broadly defined in the opening editorial of Special Issue Part 1 as “the capacity of a community to: 1) survive a major disaster, 2) retain essential structure and functions, and 3) adapt to post-disaster opportunities for transforming community structure and functions to meet new challenges.”

In this editorial essay we first explore in Section 2 the history of resilience and then locate it within current academic and policy debates. Section 3 presents summaries of the papers in this issue.
(more…)

: pp. 494-502
How Business Flow Diagram’s Improve Continuity of Operations Planning
Abstract
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Go Urakawa and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 503-508
Building Disaster Resilient Organizations in the Non-Government (NGO) Sector
Abstract
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Richard K. Eisner
: pp. 509-516
Urban Technological Risk Characterization and Management: Towards a Better Understanding of Non-Natural Threats in Merida City, Venezuela
Abstract
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Alejandro Liñayo
: pp. 517-525
Seismic Regulations Versus Modern Architectural and Urban Configurations
Abstract
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L. Teresa Guevara-Perez
: pp. 526-534
An Assessment of Coastal Zone Hazard Mitigation Plans in Texas
Abstract
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Jung Eun Kang, Walter Gillis Peacock, and Rahmawati Husein
: pp. 535-542
California’s Natural Hazard Zonation Policies for Land-Use Planning and Development
Abstract
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Charles R. Real
: pp. 543-551
Strategic Disaster Reduction Planning with Government Stakeholder Collaboration – A Case Study in Nara and Kyoto, Japan
Abstract
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Norio Maki, Keiko Tamura, and Haruo Hayashi
: pp. 552-564
Post-Disaster Redevelopment Planning: Local Capacity Building Through Pre-Event Planning
Abstract
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Sandy Meyer, Eugene Henry, Roy E.Wright, and Cynthia A. Palmer
: pp. 565-576
Working Together, Building Capacity – A Case Study of Civil Defence Emergency Management in New Zealand
Abstract
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Bo-Yao Lee
: pp. 577-590
Chile’s 2010 M8.8 Earthquake and Tsunami: Initial Observations on Resilience
Abstract
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Guillermo Franco and William Siembieda

Regular Papers

: pp. 591-600
Requirements and Verification Methodology for the Design Performance of Tsunami-Hinan Buildings (Temporary Tsunami Refuge Building)
Abstract
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Shinji Yagi and Yuji Hasemi
: pp. 601-608
Evacuation Facility Selection Situations in Whole-Building Evacuation, Actually Implemented in a Super-High-Rise Building – Results of Questionnaire Survey with Evacuees –
Abstract
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Shinji Yagi

No.4

(Aug)

Special Issue on Structural Engineering of Nuclear Related Facilities

Special Issue on Structural Engineering of Nuclear Related Facilities

: p. 339
Structural Engineering of Nuclear Related Facilities
Katsuki Takiguchi

Since it was first used, nuclear energy’s control has been an important issue. With the generation of electricity as a major nuclear energy application, the improvement of nuclear power generation technology has been required by society, including power plant design, construction, and maintenance and radioactive waste disposal.

Nuclear facilities must also take into account disaster prevention, as in the case of earthquakes and terrorist attacks, particularly because of the extensive potential and actual range of effects. This has made nuclear energy issues important considerations in JDR editorial meetings.

In the July 16, 2007, case of the Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake, quake ground motion equaled or exceeded that presumed in the design of the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, the world’s largest nuclear power station.

Specific safety objectives for nuclear power plants include stopping the nuclear reaction, cooling the nuclear reactor, preventing radioactive material emission, and shielding surroundings from radiation – all of which were almost completely achieved in this case. Many problems were also revealed, however. JDR examined a special issue on Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station earthquake resistance at an editorial meeting but determined that such a topic remains premature.

In its stead, we have planned a number featuring the structural engineering of nuclear related facilities as a first step in a series of special issues on nuclear energy. The papers for this number were submitted mainly by the presenters of 20th International Conference on Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology, held in Espoo, Finland, in 2009 with the catch phrase “Challenges Facing Nuclear Renaissance.”

We greatly appreciate the many contributions to this issue, and would like to thank the reviewers, without whose cooperation this number could not have been published.

Please note that, independent of special numbers such as this one, JDR looks forward to receiving papers on a wide range of fields related to disaster.

: pp. 340-350
Combined Asymptotic Method for Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis
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Alexander G. Tyapin
: pp. 351-360
Experimental Study on Gamma Ray Shielding with Cracked Concrete Panels
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Katsuki Takiguchi, Koshiro Nishimura, Isao Yoda, Dai Nagahara, and Kazuteru Kojima
: pp. 361-368
Study on Radiation Shielding Performance of Reinforced Concrete Wall After the Earthquake
Abstract
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Keiji Sekine , Yoshinari Munakata, Osamu Kontani, and Koji Oishi
: pp. 369-377
Seismic Capacity Test of Overhead Crane Under Horizontal and Vertical Excitation -Element Model Test Results on Nonlinear Response Behavior-
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Kenichi Suzuki, Masakatsu Inagaki, and Tadashi Iijima
: pp. 378-384
Application of “Leak Before Break” Assessment for Pressure Tube in Delayed Hydride Cracking
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Gintautas Dundulis, Albertas Grybėnas, Vidas Makarevicius, and Remigijus Janulionis
: pp. 385-394
Out-of-Plane Shear Strength of Steel-Plate-Reinforced Concrete Walls Dependent on Bond Behavior
Abstract
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Sung-Gul Hong, Wonki Kim, Kyung-Jin Lee, Namhee Kim Hong, and Dong-Hun Lee
: pp. 395-406
Adjusting Fragility Analysis to Seismic Hazard Input
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Jens-Uwe Klügel, Richard Attinger, and Shobha Rao
: pp. 407-416
Vector-Valued Fragility Analysis Using PGA and PGV Simultaneously as Ground-Motion Intensity Measures
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Sei’ichiro Fukushima
: pp. 417-425
Parametric Study on the Floor Response Spectra and the Damage Potential of Aircraft Impact Induced Vibratory Loading
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Anton Andonov, Kiril Apostolov, Dimitar Stefanov, and Marin Kostov
: pp. 426-436
Soft Missile Impact on Shear Reinforced Concrete Wall
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Arja Saarenheimo, Kim Calonius, Markku Tuomala, and Ilkka Hakola
: pp. 437-451
Hard Missile Impact on Prestressed Shear Reinforced Slab
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Markku Tuomala, Kim Calonius, Arja Saarenheimo, and Pekka Välikangas
: pp. 452-462
An Approach for Performance-Based Capacity Assessment of Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels for Internal Accidents Application to VVER 1000 Containment Vessel
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Anton Andonov, Dimitar Stefanov, and Marin Kostov
: pp. 463-468
Study on the Containment Performance of MOX Fuel Processing Glovebox in Earthquake -Loading and Leakage Tests for Window Panels-
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Akihiro Matsuda, Yuichi Uchiyama, Masakatsu Inagaki, Susumu Tsuchino, Hiroyuki Umetsu, and Koji Shirai
: pp. 469-478
Generation IV Material Issues – Case SCWR
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Sami Penttilä, Aki Toivonen, Laura Rissanen, and Liisa Heikinheimo

No.3

(Jun)

Special Issue on Sediment Induced Disasters

Special Issue on Sediment Induced Disasters

: pp. 227-228
Sediment Induced Disasters
Syunsuke Ikeda, Shinji Egashira, and Takahisa Mizuyama

Sediment induced disasters have been studied in a wide variety of research fields ranging from social to natural science, with many interesting results. This special issue provides engineers and scientists with an opportunity to share knowledge and experience in engineering research concerning mass sediment movement and related disasters. To clarify this issue’s objectives and encourage submissions, topics have been discussed based on the needs, activities, and possible contributors classified into four categories:

1) Results based on field and literature surveys and data analysis for catastrophic, recent and historical mass movement, and corresponding disaster events.

2) Results based on field surveys and data analysis for recent usual mass movement events and corresponding disasters resulting from rainfall, earthquakes, volcanic activity, and glacier lakes and natural landslide dam events.

3) Mechanics and numerical modeling for mass movement.

4) Measures against sediment-induced and similar disasters.

Last August, we began inviting submissions on these themes just as Typhoon Morakot slowly crossed Taiwan, causing historically significant rainfall events in southern Taiwan involving numerous landslides and debris flows and precipitated casualties, landscape changes, channel bed variations, etc., similar to the catastrophic sediment events occurring in Venezuela in 1999. Two papers describe what happened in Taiwan and Venezuela, providing advice on possible measures against such abnormal catastrophes. Three contributions describe historical catastrophes involving mountain collapse based on analysis of the literature, topography and field surveys, and numerical models. A total of 11 papers have been submitted, 4 of which concern applicability of constitutive equations for debris flow, numerical models for landslide occurrence due to rain fall and flood processes due to rapid landslide dam erosion, and sediment issues resulting from glacier lake outburst flooding. Two submissions focus on corrective measures.

All papers have been reviewed, revised, and accepted for publications, and we believe this special issue will stimulate future studies and prove useful in practical and scientific fields. We heartily thank all of the authors undergoing the review process, and express our sincere appreciation to the distinguished reviewers, without whose invaluable aid this issue would not have been possible.

: pp. 229-235
Sediment Induced Disasters in the World and 1999-Debris Flow Disasters in Venezuela
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Takahisa Mizuyama and Shinji Egashira
: pp. 236-244
An Overview of Disasters Resulted from Typhoon Morakot in Taiwan
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Chjeng-Lun Shieh, Chun-Ming Wang, Yu-Shiu Chen, Yuan-Jung Tsai, and Wen-Hsiao Tseng
: pp. 245-256
The Catastrophic Tombi Landslide and Accompanying Landslide Dams Induced by the 1858 Hietsu Earthquake
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Kimio Inoue, Takahisa Mizuyama, and Yukihiko Sakatani
: pp. 257-263
Large Sediment Movement Caused by the Catastrophic Ohya-Kuzure Landslide
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Satoshi Tsuchiya and Fumitoshi Imaizumi
: pp. 264-273
Field Assessment of Tam Pokhari Glacial Lake Outburst Flood in Khumbu Region, Nepal
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Rabindra Osti, Shinji Egashira, Katsuhito Miyake, and Tara Nidhi Bhattarai
: pp. 274-279
Mechanics of Debris Flow Over a Rigid Bed
Abstract
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Kuniaki Miyamoto and Yuki Tsurumi
: pp. 280-287
Numerical Simulation of Landslide Movement and Unzen-Mayuyama Disaster in 1792, Japan
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Kuniaki Miyamoto
: pp. 288-295
Prediction of Floods Caused by Landslide Dam Collapse
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Yoshifumi Satofuka, Toshio Mori, Takahisa Mizuyama, Kiichiro Ogawa, and Kousuke Yoshino
: pp. 296-306
A Prediction Method for Slope Failure by Means of Monitoring of Water Content in Slope-Soil Layer
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Masaharu Fujita, Seitaro Ohshio, and Daizo Tsutsumi
: pp. 307-314
Design Standard of Control Structures Against Debris Flow in Japan
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Nobutomo Osanai, Hideaki Mizuno, and Takahisa Mizuyama
: pp. 315-323
Emergency Response to Sediment-Related Disasters Caused by Large Earthquakes in Japan – the Case of the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake in 2008 –
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Shin’ya Katsura, Yoko Tomita, Nobutomo Osanai, Chiaki Inaba, Masashi Arai, and Osamu Saguchi

Regular Papers

: pp. 325-329
Flood Prevention Strategy in Taiwan: Lessons Learned from Typhoon Morakot
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Lung-Sheng Hsieh, Jiun-Huei Jang, Hsuan-Ju Lin, and Pao-Shan Yu

No.2

(Apr)

Special Issue on Building Local Capacity for Long-term Disaster Resilience

Special Issue on Building Local Capacity for Long-term Disaster Resilience

: pp. 127-129
“Building Local Capacity for Long-term Disaster Resilience” Toward Disaster Resilient Communities
Kenneth C. Topping, Haruo Hayashi, William Siembieda and Michael Boswell

This special issue of JDR is centered on the theme of “Building Local Capacity for Long-term Disaster Resilience.” Eight papers and one commentary describe challenges in various countries of promoting disaster resilience at local, sub-national, and national levels. Resilience is broadly defined here as the capacity of a community to: 1) survive amajor disaster; 2) retain essential structure and functions; and 3) adapt to post-disaster opportunities for transforming community structure and functions to meet new challenges. This working definition is similar to others put forward in the growing literature on resilience.

Resilience can also be seen as an element of sustainability. Initially referring only to environmental conditions, the concept of sustainable development was defined as that which meets the needs of present generations while not compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (Bruntland Commission, Our Common Future, 1987). Now, the term sustainability has come to mean the need to preserve all resources for future use, including social, physical, economic, cultural and historical, as well as environmental resources. Disasters destroy resources, making communities less sustainable or even unsustainable.

Resilience helps to protect resources, among other things, through coordination of all four disaster management functions: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Mitigation commonly involves reduction of risks and prevention of disaster losses through long-term sustained actions modifying the environment. Preparedness involves specific preparations for what to do and how to respond during a disaster at the personal, household, and community level. Response means actions taken immediately after a disaster to rescue survivors, conduct evacuation, feed and shelter victims, and restore communications. Recovery involves restoring lives, infrastructure, services, and economic activity, while seeking long-term community improvement.

When possible, emphasis should be placed on building local resilience before a disaster when opportunities are greater for fostering sustainable physical, social, economic, and environmental structures and functions. Waiting until after a disaster to pursue sustainability invites preventable losses and reduces post-disaster resilience and opportunities for improvement. Community resilience involves both “soft” strategies which optimize disaster preparedness and response, and “hard” strategies which mitigate natural and human-caused hazards, thereby reducing disaster losses. Both “soft” and “hard” strategies are undertaken during disaster recovery. In many countries “soft” and “hard” resilience approaches coexist as uncoordinated activities. However, experience suggests that disaster outcomes are better when “soft” and “hard” strategies are purposely coordinated.

Thus, “smart” resilience involves coordination of both “soft” and “hard” resilience strategies, i.e., “smart ” resilience = “soft ” resilience + “hard ” resilience. This concept is reflected in papers in Part 1 of this special issue, based on case studies from India, Japan, Mexico, Taiwan, and the US. Additional resilience studies from Japan, the US, and Venezuela will be featured in Part 2 of this special issue.

The first group of papers in Part 1 review resilience issues in regional and community recovery. Chandrasekahr (1) uses a case study to illustrate varying effects of formal stakeholder participatory framework on capacity building following the 2004 Southeast Asia Tsunami from post-disaster recovery in southern India. Chen and Wang (2) examine multiple resiliency factors reflected in community recovery case studies from the Taiwan 1999 Chi Chi Earthquake and debris flow evacuation after Typhoon Markot of 2009. Kamel (3) compares factors affecting housing recovery following the US Northridge Earthquake and Hurricane Katrina.

The second group of papers examines challenges of addressing resiliency at national and sub-national scales. Velazquez (4) examines national factors affecting disaster resilience in Mexico. Topping (5) provides an overview of the U.S. Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, a nationwide experiment in local resilience capacity building through federal financial incentives encouraging local hazard mitigation planning. Boswell, Siembieda, and Topping (6) describe a new method to evaluate effectiveness of federally funded hazard mitigation projects in the US through California’s State Mitigation Assessment Review Team (SMART) loss reduction tracking system.

The final group of papers explores methods of analysis, information dissemination, and pre-event planning. Siembieda (7) presents a model which can be deployed at any geographic level involving timely access to assets in order to reduce pre- and post-disaster vulnerability, as illustrated by community disaster recovery experiences in Central America. Hayashi (8) outlines a new information dissemination system useable at all levels called “micromedia” which provides individuals with real time disaster information regardless of their location. Finally, Poland (9) concludes with an invited special commentary addressing the challenges of creating more complete earthquake disaster resilience through pre-event evaluation of post-event needs at the community level, using San Francisco as the laboratory.

The Editorial Committee extends its sincere appreciation to both the contributors and the JDR staff for their patience and determination in making this special issue possible. Thanks also to the reviewers for their insightful analytic comments and suggestions.

Finally, the Committee wishes to thank Bayete Henderson for his keen and thorough editorial assistance and copy editing support.

: pp. 130-137
‘Setting the Stage’: How Policy Institutions Frame Participationin Post-Disaster Recovery
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Divya Chandrasekhar
: pp. 138-146
Building Community Capacity for Disaster Resilience in Taiwan
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Liang-Chun Chen and Yi-Wen Wang
: pp. 147-154
Lessons for Long-Term Residential Recovery: Factors of Community Resilience and Marginalization
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Nabil Kamel
: pp. 155-163
Social Resilience, Disaster Prevention, and Climate Change: Challenges from Mexico
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Daniel Rodríguez Velázquez
: pp. 164-171
Using National Financial Incentives to Build Local Resiliency: The U.S. Disaster Mitigation Act
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Kenneth C. Topping
: pp. 172-179
Post-Disaster Assessment of the Performance of Hazard Mitigation Projects: The California SMART Approach
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Michael R. Boswell, William J. Siembieda, and Kenneth C. Topping
: pp. 180-186
Lowering Vulnerability Using the Asset-Access-Time Method
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William J. Siembieda
: pp. 187-193
Smart Disaster Reduction Against Torrential Downpours: Micromedia Creation
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Haruo Hayashi, Keiko Tamura, Satoshi Kitada, and Satomi Sudo
: pp. 194-196
Commentary on Building Disaster Resilient Communities
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Chris D. Poland

Regular Papers

: pp. 197-207
A Proposal for Effective Emergency Training and Exercise Program to Improve Competence for Disaster Response of Disaster Responders
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Kayoko Takemoto, Yutaka Motoya, and Reo Kimura
: pp. 208-215
Logit Analysis of Socioeconomic Factors Influencing Famine in Uganda
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Washington Okori, Joseph Obua, and Venansius Baryamureeba

No.1

(Feb)

Special Issue on Effective Emergency Management: A Geographic Approach

Special Issue on Effective Emergency Management: A Geographic Approach

: pp. 3-4
Effective Emergency Management: A Geographic Approach
Haruo Hayashi and Go Urakawa

This special issue introduces 12 papers on a variety of best practices for effective emergency management using geospatial database and geographic information system (GIS).

The first seven papers are grouped under GIS in action, show how GIS is used for different disaster reduction services. In response to the 2007 Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake, GIS maps have been a part of Niigata PrefectureGovernment Emergency Operation Center work to aid in decisionmaking by providing Common Operational Picture (COP) as detailed by Tamura et al. A victim database was used as the key for integrated victim support in Kashiwazaki City in long-term recovery as detailed by Inoguchi et al. The success of GIS-based postdisaster operations vastly impacts on local governments in Wajima City, hit by the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake, where the use of GIS continued and expanded as an effective tool for building local government agency response capacity as detailed by Ura et al. In Kashiwazaki, the failure to apply municipal integrated GIS in postdisaster operations changed GIS policy to a less expensive service-oriented GIS readily available for local government agency use as detailed by Honma et al. A nationwide GIS map archive for researchers contains maps created at different disaster response stages as detailed by Nawa et al. Visualization of disaster impact using GIS is a powerful tool for disaster mitigation and preparedness, with impact by a worst-case-scenario magnitude 7.3 Tokyo Metropolitan earthquake as detailed by Suzuki et al. Design principles for visualization are reviewed by Urabe et al.

In Japan, damage certification is used as the basis for deciding public and private support eligibility for quake victims, making it imperative for local governments to issue certification based on housing damage assessment results as soon and as fairly as possible. Based on practices in Kashiwazaki City following the 2007 Niigataken Chuetsu-oki earthquake, damage to 64,000 household footprints was assessed within one month as detailed in the last five papers.

Two papers cover GIS-based data acquisition in housing damage assessment – PDA-assisted real-time input as detailed by Tonosaki et al., and OCRassisted paper result conversion as detailed by Higashida et al. In addition to housing damage assessment data, preexisting residential and housing databases should be integrated. Basic principles for creating this new database using GeoWrap are detailed by Yoshitomi et al. and implemented for Kashiwazaki as detailed by Matsuoka et al. In anticipating future disasters, a proposal to integrate local government operations both daily routine and emergency management was made