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JDR Vol.17 No.5 pp. 585-586
(2022)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2022.p0585

Editorial:

Special Issue on Future Volcano Research in Japan: Integrated Program for Next-Generation Volcano Research

Eisuke Fujita, Masato Iguchi, Yuichi Morita, Setsuya Nakada, Mitsuhiro Nakagawa, and Yuki Suzuki

National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED)
Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

Disaster Prevention Research Institute,
Kyoto University
Kagoshima, Kagoshima, Japan

National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED)
Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED)
Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

Department of Natural History Sciences,
Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido
University
Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

Faculty of Education and Integrated Arts and Sciences, Waseda University
Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan

Published:
August 1, 2022

Since Japan has 111 active volcanoes, we living there need to be prepared for the volcanic disasters that we will likely encounter in our lifetime. The Integrated Program for Next Generation Volcano Research and Human Resource Development (INeVRH), a research project of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), started in 2016 and is now in its 7th year. It is approaching its final stage will be ready to make proposals that will improve our knowledge from both scientific and practical points of view. In theme A, the Japan Volcanic Data Network (JVDN) system started its function as a volcanic research platform, providing the observation and analysis data of many universities, governmental agencies, and institutes. The JVDN system promotes collaborative, multidisciplinary study. In theme B, many strategic observation techniques now deployed have revealed the characteristics of volcanoes in detail. For example, a dense seismic and magnetic survey has clarified the fine structure of the hydrothermal system beneath volcanoes, providing information that can be used to evaluate their phreatic eruption potential. In addition, brand-new volcanic gas observation techniques using drones now obtain in-situ information effectively. Theme C has obtained geologic and petrologic findings at many volcanoes and has come to the stage in which systematic compilation of this database would be useful to comparative studies of many volcanoes. These findings are also used in numerical simulations that combine geologic, petrologic, and geophysical formulations to produce more comprehensive models used to interpret volcanic activity. Theme D focuses on the development of practical technologies for volcanic disaster mitigation, mainly related to volcanic ash. A scheme for the quick detection and evaluation of volcanic ash is proposed through observation and numerical simulation, and an experiment is performed to reveal the thickness threshold of volcanic ash deposits on air-conditioners. This special issue reports on some up-to-date topics that could become the basis of dynamic and effective links between themes A, B, C, and D, which may serve as a base and direction for discussions that summarize and conclude this 10-year project.

Cite this article as:
E. Fujita, M. Iguchi, Y. Morita, S. Nakada, M. Nakagawa, and Y. Suzuki, “Special Issue on Future Volcano Research in Japan: Integrated Program for Next-Generation Volcano Research,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.17, No.5, pp. 585-586, 2022.
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Last updated on Aug. 05, 2022