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JDR Vol.18 No.6 pp. 611-631
(2023)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2023.p0611

Paper:

Reconsideration of Urbanization in Tokyo Metropolitan Area Since 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake from the Perspective of Exposure

Osamu Murao*1,† ORCID Icon, Kyota Fujiwara*2, Haruna Kato*2, Fumitake Yonemura*2, Keiko Inagaki*3 ORCID Icon, and Kimiro Meguro*4 ORCID Icon

*1International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University
468-1 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-0845, Japan

Corresponding author

*2Department of Architecture and Building Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University
Sendai, Japan

*3Institute of Urban Innovation, Yokohama National University
Yokohama, Japan

*4Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo
Tokyo, Japan

Received:
May 8, 2023
Accepted:
August 7, 2023
Published:
September 1, 2023
Keywords:
1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, urban disaster risk, fire spread, Tokyo, densely inhabited district (DID)
Abstract

The year 2023 marks the 100th commemoration of the disastrous Kanto Earthquake in Japan, which shattered the urban fabric of Tokyo and other southern prefectures. In the years following 1923, much research into disaster risk reduction (especially fire prevention) was undertaken. This study evaluated research trends and the impact of the earthquake on the city using metropolitan population data. The following is reported: (1) This study summarized English and Japanese academic papers and reports on the Great Kanto Earthquake that have been published over the last 100 years. (2) The area of fire spread and number of damaged buildings in Tokyo due to the Great Kanto Earthquake were overwhelmingly larger than those in other areas. (3) The difference in the relative amount of damage caused by natural disasters with more than 1,000 death toll to the annual national budget in Japan became clear. (4) The Great Kanto Earthquake was the only natural disaster that caused a net worth of damage exceeding the Japanese national budget by 3.8 times. (5) The expansion of the Tokyo metropolitan area over the 100 years since the Great Kanto Earthquake was visually clarified based on demographics. (6) Today, many people live densely on soft ground, with an amplification factor of 1.8 or higher, which is 23.0% of the total population.

Cite this article as:
O. Murao, K. Fujiwara, H. Kato, F. Yonemura, K. Inagaki, and K. Meguro, “Reconsideration of Urbanization in Tokyo Metropolitan Area Since 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake from the Perspective of Exposure,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.18 No.6, pp. 611-631, 2023.
Data files:
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Last updated on May. 19, 2024