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JDR Vol.13 No.2 pp. 262-271
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2018.p0262
(2018)

Paper:

Assessment of Street Network Accessibility in Tokyo Metropolitan Area After a Large Earthquake

Toshihiro Osaragi, Maki Kishimoto, and Takuya Oki

Tokyo Institute of Technology
2-12-1-M1-25, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
October 27, 2017
Accepted:
February 23, 2018
Online released:
March 19, 2018
Published:
March 20, 2018
Keywords:
large earthquake, street network accessibility, property collapse, emergency behavior, local environment
Abstract

It is difficult to evaluate the street network accessibility after a large earthquake occurs. In this paper, we construct a model to evaluate the street network accessibility for wide-area emergency behaviors under the condition of property damage in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area after a large earthquake. Additionally, we analyze the relationships between a local environment and street network accessibility by using multiple regression analysis. Finally, we discuss some important factors for evaluating risk mitigation strategies.

Cite this article as:
T. Osaragi, M. Kishimoto, and T. Oki, “Assessment of Street Network Accessibility in Tokyo Metropolitan Area After a Large Earthquake,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.13, No.2, pp. 262-271, 2018.
Data files:
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Last updated on Aug. 17, 2018