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JDR Vol.14 No.9 pp. 1329-1335
(2019)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2019.p1329

Paper:

Three-Dimensional Measurement for Revitalization of Intangible Cultural Properties After Disasters

Yu Fukuda

Center for Northeast Asian Studies (CNEAS), Tohoku University
41 Kawauchi, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8576, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
June 2, 2019
Accepted:
September 29, 2019
Published:
December 1, 2019
Keywords:
disaster humanities, Core Research Cluster of Disaster Science, intangible cultural properties, SfM/MVS, 3D measurement
Abstract

Various traditional festivals have taken place in most of the community in the coastal areas of the Tohoku region before the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. Recent studies have revealed that reviving these festivals plays a crucial role for people to reconstruct a community life in the tsunami-affected area. Despite the importance of the intangible cultural properties, not only outfits used but also crafts to make those kits were swept away by the 2011 tsunami. Under this background, this research attempts to record the three-dimensional data of those materials used in festivals and folk performing arts. This project aims to construct the database of those props used for the intangible cultural properties and offer three-dimensional data to the disaster-affected area to rebuild their community life. Another goal of this explorative project is to create a methodology of three-dimensional measurement in the field of the disaster humanity science. By scanning cultural properties in disaster-prone areas not only in Japan but also in other countries, the project attempts to connect international networks to discuss the applicability of this method.

Cite this article as:
Y. Fukuda, “Three-Dimensional Measurement for Revitalization of Intangible Cultural Properties After Disasters,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.14, No.9, pp. 1329-1335, 2019.
Data files:
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Last updated on Dec. 10, 2019