single-dr.php

JDR Vol.18 No.6 pp. 666-673
(2023)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2023.p0666

Paper:

Significance of Medium-Wave AM Radio Broadcasting for Enhanced Disaster Resilience in Japan: A Case Study in the Kanto Region and Fukui Using Nonpowered Hoop-Shaped Radio

Eiichi Shoji ORCID Icon

Advanced Materials Innovation & Monozukuri Lab, Department of Mechanical and System Engineering, University of Fukui
3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui 910-8507, Japan

Corresponding author

Received:
May 15, 2023
Accepted:
August 18, 2023
Published:
September 1, 2023
Keywords:
disaster-prevention radio, medium-wave AM broadcasting, nonpowered radio, sustainable radio, hoop-shaped radio
Abstract

On the occasion of centenary anniversary of the Great Kanto Earthquake and commencement of radio broadcasting in Japan, this study reiterates the paramount importance of medium-wave (MW) AM broadcasting in safeguarding public safety and security. Utilizing the electromagnetic principles of MW, the author has earlier developed hoop-shaped radio (HOOPRA), which is a battery-free sustainable radio receiver. This study aims to determine the maximum achievable reception distance with HOOPRA for broadcasts from public stations, such as Nihon Hoso Kyokai (NHK) JOFG (927 kHz, 5 kW) in Fukui; and NHK JOAK (594 kHz, 300 kW) and JOAB (693 kHz, 500 kW) in the Kanto region. The significance of the findings in this study is that approximately 38 million individuals in the Kanto region, residing within an 80-km radius of JOAK or JOAB, can access broadcasts using only the energy of radio waves with HOOPRA. Additionally, ∼0.4 million people in Fukui, within a 15-km radius of JOFG, can potentially be recipients of the broadcast. Given that most transmitting stations operate at 5-kW power nationwide, HOOPRA can be effectively utilized within a 15-km radius of each station. Moreover, these outcomes validate the efficacy of HOOPRA as a radio receiver and provide valuable insights into the global potential applicability of MW AM radios. Furthermore, the current investigation underscores the need to reevaluate the significance of terrestrial MW broadcasting as a vital source of emergency information, especially in the event of anticipated natural disasters, such as the predicted Nankai Trough Earthquake.

Cite this article as:
E. Shoji, “Significance of Medium-Wave AM Radio Broadcasting for Enhanced Disaster Resilience in Japan: A Case Study in the Kanto Region and Fukui Using Nonpowered Hoop-Shaped Radio,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.18 No.6, pp. 666-673, 2023.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] Cabinet Office, “Disaster Prevention Related Information – Reports Part 1 (1923 Great Kanto Earthquake),” Subcommittee of Special Board of Inquiry on Inheriting the Lessons of Past Disasters, 2006.7. https://www.bousai.go.jp/kyoiku/kyokun/kyoukunnokeishou/rep/1923_kanto_daishinsai/index.html [Accessed May 9, 2023]
  2. [2] Cabinet Office, “Disaster Prevention Related Information – Reports Part 2 (1923 Great Kanto Earthquake),” Subcommittee of Special Board of Inquiry on Inheriting the Lessons of Past Disasters, 2008.3. https://www.bousai.go.jp/kyoiku/kyokun/kyoukunnokeishou/rep/1923_kanto_daishinsai_2/index.html [Accessed May 9, 2023]
  3. [3] Cabinet Office, “Disaster Prevention Related Information – Reports Part 3 (1923 Great Kanto Earthquake),” Subcommittee of Special Board of Inquiry on Inheriting the Lessons of Past Disasters, 2008.3. https://www.bousai.go.jp/kyoiku/kyokun/kyoukunnokeishou/rep/1923_kanto_daishinsai_3/index.html [Accessed May 9, 2023]
  4. [4] M. Kato, “Establishment of the Broadcasting System and Tsuyoshi Inukai: Analysis of Ministry of Communications internal materials and Imperial Diet responses,” The NHK monthly report on broadcast research, pp. 58-69, 2011.4
  5. [5] Japan Broadcasting Corporation (Ed.), “Hoso gojyunenshi [Honhen],” Japan Broadcasting Publishing Association, 1977.
  6. [6] Japan Broadcasting Corporation, (Ed.), “Hoso gojyunenshi [shiryohen],” Japan Broadcasting Publishing Association, 1977.
  7. [7] Japan Broadcasting Corporation (Ed.), “Nihon Hososhi [Jokan] (aka 35 nenshi),” Japan Broadcasting Publishing Association, 1965.
  8. [8] Japan Broadcasting Corporation (Ed.), “Nihon Hososhi [Bekkan] (aka 35 nenshi),” Japan Broadcasting Publishing Association, 1965.
  9. [9] Japan Broadcasting Corporation (Ed.), “Nihon Hososhi (aka 25 nenshi),” Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 1951.
  10. [10] Japan Broadcasting Corporation (Ed.), “The History of Broadcasting in Japan in the 20th Century [Jo-kan],” Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 2001.
  11. [11] G. Marconi, “Wireless Telegraphic Communication: Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1909,” Nobel Lectures, Physics 1901–1921, Amsterdam: Elsevier Publishing Company, pp. 196-222, 1967.
  12. [12] J. Grant, “Experiments and Results in Wireless Telephony,” The American Telephone J., pp. 49-51, January 26, 1907.
  13. [13] A. F. MacLennan, “Celebrating a Hundred Years of Broadcasting – An Introduction and Timeline,” J. of Radio & Audio Media, Vol.27, No.2, pp. 191-207, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1080/19376529.2020.1831865
  14. [14] M. Naka, “The Voices and Hearts of the People were Broadcast from Radio, the Instrument of Civilization : Focusing on the Analysis of Periodicals in Outer Dalian and Inland Osaka,” J. of Comprehensive Cultural Studies, Vol.16, pp. 22-60, 2022. https://doi.org/10.15017/5068309
  15. [15] M. Nakamura, “A Study of the ’National School Hour’ Radio Programs, 1941-1945, Focusing on Scripts for Pre-schoolers,” The Japanese J. of the Historical Studies of Early Childhood Education and Care, Vol.14, pp. 1-14, 2019. https://doi.org/10.20658/youjikyoikushi.14.0_1
  16. [16] T. Endo, “Newly Boosted NHK Tokyo (Shobu Kuki) Radio Broadcasting Station,” The J. of the Institute of Television Engineers of Japan, Vol.36, No.9, pp. 841-843, 1982. https://doi.org/10.3169/itej1978.36.9_841
  17. [17] Statistics Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, “Population Estimates (as of October 1, 2022).” https://www.stat.go.jp/data/jinsui/2022np/index.html [Accessed May 9, 2023]
  18. [18] E. Shoji, “Magnetic Field Flexible Energy Harvester,” Japanese Patent Application No.2018-241880, Japanese Patent Application No.2020-563278, PCT/JP2019/050477.
  19. [19] E. Shoji, “Development and Performance of a Battery-Free Disaster Prevention Radio ‘HOOPRA’ Using the Energy Harvested from Radio Waves,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.11, No.3, pp. 593-598, 2016. https://doi.org/10.20965/jdr.2016.p0593
  20. [20] E. Shoji, “Multi-loop Type Antenna and Loop Antenna Type Passive Radio,” Japanese Patent Application, No.2021-163133, 2021.
  21. [21] Cabinet Office (Disaster Management Section), Nankai Trough earthquake disaster prevention measures, Central Disaster Prevention Council, “Guidelines for consideration of disaster prevention measures in preparation for various forms of Nankai Trough earthquakes [1st edition].” https://www.bousai.go.jp/jishin/nankai/index.html [Accessed May 9, 2023]
  22. [22] Information and Communications White Paper, “Chapter 3 Lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake and the role of ICT,” pp. 255-287, 2012. https://www.soumu.go.jp/johotsusintokei/whitepaper/ja/h24/pdf/24honpen.pdf [Accessed May 9, 2023]
  23. [23] Statistics Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, “jSTAT MAP, Data: 2020 national census.” https://www.e-stat.go.jp/ [Accessed May 9, 2023]
  24. [24] Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, “AM and FM broadcasting.” https://www.soumu.go.jp/main_content/000216453.pdf [Accessed May 9, 2023]

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, Opera.

Last updated on May. 19, 2024