single-dr.php

JDR Vol.10 No.2 pp. 238-245
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2015.p0238
(2015)

Paper:

Current Issues Regarding the Incident Command System in the Philippines

Miho Ohara and Hisaya Sawano

International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM)
under the Auspices of UNESCO, Public Works Research Institute (PWRI)
1-6 Minamihara, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

Received:
October 24, 2014
Accepted:
January 28, 2015
Published:
April 1, 2015
Keywords:
Incident Command System (ICS), Republic of the Philippines, crisis management, disaster response
Abstract

The First Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Committee on Disaster Management Meeting established a framework for ASEAN-US cooperation on the Disaster Management Program in 2003, focusing on capability building for the Incident Command System (ICS). The ICS was then adopted as part of the on-scene disaster response system in the Republic of the Philippines as enacted by the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act in 2010. This study investigates the process of adopting the ICS, its current status, and future issues through interview surveys of local and national governments in the Philippines. After adopting and implementing of the ICS as the national disaster response system for the Philippines is investigated, the current status of the ICS at the local government level is surveyed in a flood-prone area of the Pampanga River basin in central Luzon. Results show that the ICS has been adopted on all levels of government – national, regional, provincial, municipal, and barangay, i.e., the country’s smallest administrative division. Each local government level has incorporated the ICS into its contingency plan. Several issues related to future disaster response planning and capacity building are then reviewed.

Cite this article as:
M. Ohara and H. Sawano, “Current Issues Regarding the Incident Command System in the Philippines,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.10, No.2, pp. 238-245, 2015.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] Barangay Bulusan, “Barangay disaster risk reduction and management plan,” 2014.
  2. [2] Congress of the Philippines, “The Philippine disaster risk reduction and management act of 2010 (Republic Act No. 10121),” 2010.
  3. [3] Culumpit Municipality, “Presentation on proposed post-pedring rehabilitation projects,” 2012.
  4. [4] Culumpit Municipality, “Culumpit municipal disaster risk reduction and management contingency plan,” 2014.
  5. [5] National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, “Implementing rules and regulations of republic act No.10121,” 2010.
  6. [6] National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, “Situation report No.13 effects of Typhoon Quiel,” 2011.
  7. [7] National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, “Situation report No.19 effects of southwest monsoon enhanced by Typhoon Haikui,” 2012.
  8. [8] National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, “Memorandum circular No.04, s: Implementing guidelines in the use of Incident Command System (ICS) as an on-scene disaster response and management mechanism under the Philippine disaster risk reduction and management system,” 2012.
  9. [9] National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, “Situation report No.20 effects of southwest monsoon (Habagat) enhanced by Typhoon Storm Maring,” 2013.
  10. [10] National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, “National disaster response plan as of June 2014,” 2014.
  11. [11] National Fire Protection Association, “NFPA 1600: Standard on disaster/emergency management and business continuity programs,” 2013.
  12. [12] Province of Bulacan, “Contingenci plan,“ 2014.
  13. [13] UNHCR and National Disaster Coordinating Council, “Contingency planning for emergencies – A manual for local government units –,” 2003.

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, IE9,10,11, Opera.

Last updated on Jul. 19, 2018