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JDR Vol.9 No.5 pp. 768-773
(2014)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2014.p0768

Review:

About the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) – An Overview

Yoshiyuki Nagai

Center of Research Network for Infectious Diseases (CRNID), RIKEN, 1-101 Kandajimbocho, Tokyo 101-0051, Japan

Received:
April 7, 2014
Accepted:
May 28, 2014
Published:
October 1, 2014
Keywords:
emerging and reemerging infections, international collaboration, J-GRID, AMED
Abstract

J-GRID is an undertaking to enhance international research collaboration across national borders, which has been commissioned by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) to Japanese universities and research institutions. The undertaking includes the construction of bilateral collaboration centers in the counterpart countries and their networking. As the headquarters of this network, Center of Research Network for Infectious Diseases (CRNID) was set up at RIKEN. Since its initiation in 3 countries in FY2005, J-GRID has expanded to include 13 research collaboration centers in 8 countries (6 in Asia and 2 in Africa). J-GRID was highly appreciated as an ideal model of Japan’s science and technology diplomacy and an important platform to mitigate the risk of infectious diseases in the counterpart countries, our own country and the world. Recently, the Japanese government decided to create a new funding and managing body named Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), which is expected to start in 2015. The AMED selected 9 special topics of high priority. One of them is “The Control of Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases” and J-GRID is expected to enhance research capacity and make a great deal of contribution in this scheme. Here, I look back on the 10 years journey of J-GRID development since its initiation and discuss the future perspective.

Cite this article as:
Yoshiyuki Nagai, “About the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) – An Overview,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.9, No.5, pp. 768-773, 2014.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] R. Lazona, M. Naghavi, K. E. Foreman et al., “Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2010,” The Lancet, Vol.380, pp. 2095-2128, 2012.

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Last updated on May. 14, 2021