single-dr.php

JDR Vol.8 No.5 pp. 861-868
(2013)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2013.p0861

Paper:

Exposure Analysis Using the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan

Nobuoto Nojima*, Satoshi Fujikawa**, Yutaka Ishikawa**,
Toshihiko Okumura**, Hiroyuki Fujiwara***,
and Nobuyuki Morikawa***

*Department of Engineering, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193, Japan

**Institute of Technology, Shimizu Corporation, 3-4-17 Etchujima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8530, Japan

***National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, 31 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0006, Japan

Received:
May 7, 2013
Accepted:
August 12, 2013
Published:
October 1, 2013
Keywords:
probabilistic seismic hazard maps, JMA Seismic Intensity, area exposure, population exposure, site amplification factor
Abstract

With the aim of better understanding and more effective utilization of probabilistic seismic hazard maps in Japan, exposure analysis has been carried out by combining hazard maps with population distribution maps. Approximately 80% of the population of Japan is exposed to a relatively high seismic hazard, i.e., a 3% probability of exceeding JMAseismic intensity 6 lower within 30 years. In highly populated areas, specifically in major metropolitan areas, seismic hazard tends to relatively high because of the site amplification effects of holocene deposits. In implementing earthquake disaster mitigation measures, it is important to consider the overlapping effect of seismic hazard and demographic distributions.

Cite this article as:
Nobuoto Nojima, Satoshi Fujikawa, Yutaka Ishikawa,
Toshihiko Okumura, Hiroyuki Fujiwara, and
and Nobuyuki Morikawa, “Exposure Analysis Using the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.8, No.5, pp. 861-868, 2013.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] Earthquake Research Committee, Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, “National Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan,” 162p. March 23, 2005,
    http://www.jishin.go.jp/main/chousa/06mar_yosoku-e/NationalSeismicHazardMaps.pdf [accessed January 9, 2013]
  2. [2] Y. Ishikawa, T. Okumura, J. Miyakoshi, and N. Nojima, “National Statistics of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard (Part 1) – Statistical Distribution of Shaking Intensity,” Proc. of 4th Annual Meeting, Japan Assoc. Earthq. Eng., pp. 326-327, 2005 (in Japanese).
  3. [3] N. Nojima, Y. Ishikawa, T. Okumura, and J. Miyakoshi, “National Statistics of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard (Part 2) – Population Exposure to Seismic Hazard,” Proc. 4th Annual Meeting, Japan Assoc. Earthq. Eng., pp. 328-329, 2005 (in Japanese).
  4. [4] Earthquake Research Committee, Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, “Investigation on Seismic Hazard Assessment in the Future, – Results from Investigation in 2011 and 2012 –,” December 21, 2012 (in Japanese),
    http://www.jishin.go.jp/main/chousa/12_yosokuchizu/index.htm [accessed January 9, 2013]
  5. [5] National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, “Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station, J-SHIS,” 2012,
    http://www.j-shis.bosai.go.jp/ [accessed January 9, 2013]
  6. [6] Earthquake Research Committee, Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, “Long Term Evaluation of the Seismic Activity from off Sanriku to off Boso Peninsula (the second edition),” November 25, 2011 (in Japanese),
    http://www.jishin.go.jp/main/chousa/11nov_sanriku/ [accessed January 9, 2013]
  7. [7] Statistics Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, “Outline of the 2005 Population Census of Japan,”
    http://www.stat.go.jp/english/data/kokusei/2005/outline.htm [accessed January 9, 2013]

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, Opera.

Last updated on May. 04, 2021