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JDR Vol.5 No.5 pp. 494-502
(2010)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2010.p0494

Paper:

How Business Flow Diagram’s Improve Continuity of Operations Planning

Go Urakawa* and Haruo Hayashi**

*Institute of Sustainability Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan

**Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI), Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan

Received:
November 24, 2009
Accepted:
September 1, 2010
Published:
October 1, 2010
Keywords:
post-disaster operations manual, BIA, business continuity, BFD, project management, workshop, social capital
Abstract

Efforts to create manuals on measures for effectively implementing post-disaster operations pose two problems – (1) Many practitioners have no practical experience in post-disaster operations and (2) Formats and methods depend on personal skills and effort. In this paper, we discuss how to extract priority operations using business impact analysis (BIA) based on business continuity plans and develop the projectmanagement-based business flow diagram (BFD) and workflow to support practical post-disaster operations. This approach focuses on creating manuals on enhancing responder awareness through workshops for building social capital.

Cite this article as:
Go Urakawa and Haruo Hayashi, “How Business Flow Diagram’s Improve Continuity of Operations Planning,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.5, No.5, pp. 494-502, 2010.
Data files:
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Last updated on Mar. 01, 2021