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JDR Vol.8 No.1 pp. 48-56
(2013)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2013.p0048

Paper:

An Experimental Data Handling System for Ensemble Numerical Weather Predictions Using a Web-Based Data Server and Analysis Tool “Gfdnavi”

Shigenori Otsuka*, Seiya Nishizawa**, Takeshi Horinouchi***,
and Shigeo Yoden*

*Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan

**RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26, Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan

***Division of Earth System Science, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-10, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan

Received:
October 10, 2012
Accepted:
November 22, 2012
Published:
February 1, 2013
Keywords:
analysis, visualization, database, web application, ensemble numerical weather predictions
Abstract

Gfdnavi is a web-based data and knowledge server program for geophysical fluid data that constructs databases, provides analysis and visualization tools, and shares knowledge documents. A new Gfdnavi user interface for analyzing and visualizing data on web browsers is developed to improve the user experience by providing seamless analysis and visualization operations, multiple diagram editing, a layer function, and so on. An experimental data handling system for ensemble numerical weather prediction data is constructed using Gfdnavi to address such issues as data processing and transfer between weather centers and decision makers in various sectors, including that of disaster management. Special tools to analyze and visualize ensemble numerical weather prediction data are implemented as user-defined Gfdnavi plug-ins. An interactive document that provides basic ideas of how to utilize probabilistic ensemble data information is written with the Gfdnavi knowledge documentation system, in which hyperlinks enable users to edit diagrams in the document.

Cite this article as:
Shigenori Otsuka, Seiya Nishizawa, Takeshi Horinouchi, and
and Shigeo Yoden, “An Experimental Data Handling System for Ensemble Numerical Weather Predictions Using a Web-Based Data Server and Analysis Tool “Gfdnavi”,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.8, No.1, pp. 48-56, 2013.
Data files:
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