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JDR Vol.10 No.3 pp. 486-494
(2015)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2015.p0486

Paper:

Growth of Mangrove Forests and the Influence on Flood Disaster at Amami Oshima Island, Japan

Akira Tai*1, Akihiro Hashimoto*2, Takuya Oba*3, Kazuki Kawai*3, Kazuaki Otsuki*4, Hiromitsu Nagasaka*5, and Tomonori Saita*6

*1Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University
744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan

*2Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Japan

*3Department of Maritime Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Japan

*4Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Japan

*5IDEA Consultants, Inc., Japan

*6Department of Ocean Civil Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, Japan

Received:
December 17, 2014
Accepted:
April 20, 2015
Published:
June 1, 2015
Keywords:
Amami Oshima, mangrove, sediment transport
Abstract

“Mangrove” is the generic name for plants growing on tropical and subtropical tidal flats. The mangrove is used for many things, including disaster protecting land from high waves and tides and tsunamis, cleaning rivers and drainage containing soil and sand, and providing a variety of organisms with living space. Climate change and rising sea levels are threatening the future of the mangrove. Developing effective ways to conserve mangroves is thus needed, but more must be known about how the mangrove’s ecology and how it develops. It has been pointed out, for example, that mangroves increased flooding by the Sumiyo River in Amami Oshima. We studied ways to develop the mangrove at the Sumiyo River mouth in Amami Oshima and its influence in local flooding, finding that the current mangrove forest had little influence on flooding and that sediment deposition accelerating in Sumiyo Bay due to a sea dike could enlarge the mangrove forest in future.

Cite this article as:
A. Tai, A. Hashimoto, T. Oba, K. Kawai, K. Otsuki, H. Nagasaka, and T. Saita, “Growth of Mangrove Forests and the Influence on Flood Disaster at Amami Oshima Island, Japan,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.10, No.3, pp. 486-494, 2015.
Data files:
References
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Last updated on Oct. 18, 2019