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JDR Vol.5 No.3 pp. 236-244
(2010)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2010.p0236

Paper:

An Overview of Disasters Resulted from Typhoon Morakot in Taiwan

Chjeng-Lun Shieh*, Chun-Ming Wang**, Yu-Shiu Chen**,
Yuan-Jung Tsai*, and Wen-Hsiao Tseng*

*Department of Hydraulic and Ocean Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan

**Disaster Prevention Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70109, Taiwan

Received:
January 18, 2010
Accepted:
April 19, 2010
Published:
June 1, 2010
Keywords:
Typhoon Morakot, compound hazard, rainfall, flood, sediment-related disaster
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to provide information on disasters caused by Typhoon Morakot in Taiwan. The torrential rainfall is regarded as the main cause, so information on the torrential rainfall is explored first. The maximum cumulative rainfall depth observed during Typhoon Morakot approached the world’s greatest point rainfall record, and isohyets of cumulative rainfall depth are included, together with storm centers. Storm centers are important to disasters resulted from Typhoon Morakot, because these disasters occurred around or downstream from storm centers. Disasters triggered by Typhoon Morakot include floods, landslides, landslide dams, driftwood accumulation, and water supply disruption. Those occurring simultaneously or consecutively at one location are termed “compound hazards.” Current warning systems for single disasters may not be sufficient to handle compound hazards, suggesting that we must develop new systems for issuing early warnings about compound hazards.

Cite this article as:
Chjeng-Lun Shieh, Chun-Ming Wang, Yu-Shiu Chen,
Yuan-Jung Tsai, and Wen-Hsiao Tseng, “An Overview of Disasters Resulted from Typhoon Morakot in Taiwan,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.5, No.3, pp. 236-244, 2010.
Data files:
References
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    http://rdc28.cwb.gov.tw/data.php.
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  3. [3] Water resource agency, Ministry of economic affairs, Taiwan, “Dreading and restoration after Typhoon Morakot,” Water resource agency, Ministry of economic affairs, Taiwan, 2009 (in Chinese).
  4. [4] World Meteorological Organization, “Guide to hydrological practices,” WMO-No 168, Fifth edition, World Meteorological Organization, 1994.
  5. [5] Water resource agency, Ministry of economic affairs, Taiwan, “Study on riverbed variations and flood preventions of Tsengwen river and Yanshuei river,” Water resource agency, Ministry of economic affairs, Taiwan, 2005 (in Chinese).

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Last updated on Mar. 01, 2021