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JDR Vol.5 No.2 pp. 187-193
(2010)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2010.p0187

Paper:

Smart Disaster Reduction Against Torrential Downpours: Micromedia Creation

Haruo Hayashi*1, Keiko Tamura*2, Satoshi Kitada*3,
and Satomi Sudo*4

*1Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI), Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan

*2Risk Management Office, Niigata University, Ikarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181, Japan

*3Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University, 36-1 Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan

*4i-forum

Received:
February 23, 2010
Accepted:
April 19, 2010
Published:
April 1, 2010
Keywords:
micro media, mobile phone, car navigation system, GPS, disaster information
Abstract

In response to frequent flooding disasters due to local torrential downpours, the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), along with other organizations, has advanced rapid tracking systems for torrential rains. It is also noted that people can now be easily located by the widespread dissemination of mobile phones and car navigation systems with easy-to-use global positioning systems (GPS). Unfortunately, the current practice of disseminating disaster information has failed to incorporate recent these technological innovations. In this paper, we propose a way to establish a new information dissemination media called “micromedia,” which provides individuals with disaster prevention information in real time, regardless of their location.

Cite this article as:
Haruo Hayashi, Keiko Tamura, Satoshi Kitada, and
and Satomi Sudo, “Smart Disaster Reduction Against Torrential Downpours: Micromedia Creation,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.5, No.2, pp. 187-193, 2010.
Data files:
References
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