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JDR Vol.5 No.2 pp. 180-186
(2010)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2010.p0180

Paper:

Lowering Vulnerability Using the Asset-Access-Time Method

William J. Siembieda

Department of City and Regional Planning, College of Architecture and Environmental Design, California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo, Room 21-128, 1 Grand Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA

Received:
January 10, 2010
Accepted:
February 10, 2010
Published:
April 1, 2010
Keywords:
assets, access, mitigation, vulnerability, disaster recovery, capacity building, participatory risk assessment, resiliency
Abstract

This paper develops the asset-access-time (AAT) model. The model has three variables: assets, access, and time. Assets are resources (economic, physical, human and institutional) available to households, communities and governments. Access is the ability to use the assets after a disaster event occurs. Time is a dynamic variable influencing when an asset is available to a user and influences its asset value. The combination of the three variables and how they are linked to classes of people, institutions, and places is discussed. Section 1 develops the model components in a linear and rational fashion and provides some examples. Section 2 describes how this model can be adapted to meet local requirements through an example in El Salvador. The model can be used to build a disaster resilience profile. This paper is part of a larger exploration of “asset-based mitigation,” a process of vulnerability reduction through pre-disaster investments in asset protection. Policy implications for disaster management using this method are developed.

Cite this article as:
William J. Siembieda, “Lowering Vulnerability Using the Asset-Access-Time Method,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.5, No.2, pp. 180-186, 2010.
Data files:
References
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