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JDR Vol.7 No.4 pp. 376-385
(2012)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2012.p0376

Paper:

Treatment of Unexpected Risk on Business Continuity Management Learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake

Hitoshi Kawaguchi

Department of Management Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555, Japan

Received:
February 15, 2012
Accepted:
May 9, 2012
Published:
June 1, 2012
Keywords:
Business Continuity Management (BCM), recovery time objective, the Great East Japan Earthquake, risk assessment, unexpected risk
Abstract

The Great East Japan Earthquake hit the Tohoku district Pacific coast at March 11, 2011. This earthquake exceeded by far the earthquake scale, tsunami height, and damage size that had been assumed conventionally by a specialty committee located in Japan’s Central Disaster Prevention Council. To fill in the gap between earthquakes that had been assumed conventionally and the reality that was witnessed with their own eyes in this earthquake, trace investigations for gigantic earthquakes and tsunamis in old age are currently being carried out [18]. Under these circumstances, this paper focuses on the problem of unexpected disasters based on the viewpoint of Business Continuity Management (BCM), referring to survey results, which were immediately conducted among domestic companies after this earthquake. Characteristics of the problem of unexpected disasters are to have to solve two problems: how to assume unexpected events and the delay of “current recoverable time” that occurs as a result.

Cite this article as:
Hitoshi Kawaguchi, “Treatment of Unexpected Risk on Business Continuity Management Learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.7, No.4, pp. 376-385, 2012.
Data files:
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