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JDR Vol.9 No.4 pp. 443-451
(2014)
doi: 10.20965/jdr.2014.p0443

Paper:

Effects of Research and Development Expenditure and Climate Variability on Agricultural Productivity Growth in Ghana

Geetha Mohan*, Hirotaka Matsuda**, Samuel A. Donkoh***,
Victor Lolig***, and Gideon Danso Abbeam***

*Integrated Research System for Sustainability Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1133-8654, Japan

**Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Japan

***Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics, University for Development Studies (UDS), Ghana

Received:
February 10, 2014
Accepted:
June 18, 2014
Published:
August 1, 2014
Keywords:
total factor productivity, research and development, climate variability, Ghana
Abstract

This paper examines the effects of agricultural research expenditure and climate change on agricultural productivity growth by region in Ghana. A panel dataset is constructed for 2000-2009 from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Ghana; and the Agriculture Science and Technology Indicators (ASTI) database of the International Food Policy Research Institute. A Malmquist index was used to compute agricultural productivity growth, including decomposition components efficiency change and technical change. The determinants of productivity growth are examined using a fixed effects regression model. The results specify that significant causal factors impact positively on Ghana’s agricultural productivity growth, include climate variability, infrastructure, and agricultural research and development expenditure. The study confirms there is a need to strengthen and develop new technological progress for sustainable agricultural production in Ghana.

Cite this article as:
Geetha Mohan, Hirotaka Matsuda, Samuel A. Donkoh,
Victor Lolig, and Gideon Danso Abbeam, “Effects of Research and Development Expenditure and Climate Variability on Agricultural Productivity Growth in Ghana,” J. Disaster Res., Vol.9, No.4, pp. 443-451, 2014.
Data files:
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