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JRM Vol.30 No.6 pp. 880-891
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2018.p0880
(2018)

Paper:

Analysis of Displayable Force Region at Passive-Type Force Display with Redundant Brakes – Development of Rehabilitation System for Upper Limbs mboxPLEMO-Y (Redundant) –

Naoyuki Takesue*, Junji Furusho*,**, Shota Mochizuki*, and Takeaki Watanabe*

*Tokyo Metropolitan University
6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan

**Fuzzy Logic Systems Institute
680-41 Kawatsu, Iizuka-shi, Fukuoka 820-0067, Japan

Received:
June 24, 2018
Accepted:
October 2, 2018
Published:
December 20, 2018
Keywords:
rehabilitation system, passive-type force display, upper limb, redundancy
Abstract
Analysis of Displayable Force Region at Passive-Type Force Display with Redundant Brakes – Development of Rehabilitation System for Upper Limbs mboxPLEMO-Y (Redundant) –

PLEMO-Y (Redundant), a passive-type rehabilitation system for upper limbs

Robotic rehabilitation systems for upper limbs have been developed as two system types: active or passive. Active-type systems use actuators to provide users with varying degrees of force; in contrast, the force available from passive-type systems is limited, although these systems are safer to use. In this paper, a passive-type force display with redundant brakes is proposed to extend the displayable force region of the system. The kinematics and statics are derived, and the reaction force generated by brake torques is clarified. The displayable force region is analyzed in the simulation, and then the experiments are examined to verify the proposed analytical model.

Cite this article as:
N. Takesue, J. Furusho, S. Mochizuki, and T. Watanabe, “Analysis of Displayable Force Region at Passive-Type Force Display with Redundant Brakes – Development of Rehabilitation System for Upper Limbs mboxPLEMO-Y (Redundant) –,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.30, No.6, pp. 880-891, 2018.
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Last updated on Oct. 19, 2019