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JRM Vol.23 No.4 pp. 494-504
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2011.p0494
(2011)

Paper:

Sensor Arrangement for Classification of Life Activities with Pyroelectric Sensors – Arrangement to Save Sensors and to Quasi-Maximize Classification Precision

Taketoshi Mori, Ryo Urushibata, Hiroshi Noguchi,
Masamichi Shimosaka, Hiromi Sanada, and Tomomasa Sato

The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Received:
December 17, 2010
Accepted:
April 4, 2011
Published:
August 20, 2011
Keywords:
intelligent environment, sensor localization, behavior labeling, health care, daily-life support
Abstract

This paper deals with the sensor arrangement for activity classification systems with a group of pyroelectric sensors to realize a system with high classification performance using as few sensors as possible. It targets the people living alone. We convert this discrete optimization problem, which means whether or not the system select a sensor position candidate, to continuous, convex, and sparse optimization problem, and solve it efficiently by extended multi-class LPBoost via column generation. For some examinations, we showed the advantage of this algorithm. We also confirmed the significance of automatic arrangement system by comparing the arrangement obtained by this algorithm with the arrangement obtained by human judge.

Cite this article as:
Taketoshi Mori, Ryo Urushibata, Hiroshi Noguchi,
Masamichi Shimosaka, Hiromi Sanada, and Tomomasa Sato, “Sensor Arrangement for Classification of Life Activities with Pyroelectric Sensors – Arrangement to Save Sensors and to Quasi-Maximize Classification Precision,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.23, No.4, pp. 494-504, 2011.
Data files:
References
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