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JACIII Vol.11 No.10 pp. 1232-1240
doi: 10.20965/jaciii.2007.p1232
(2007)

Paper:

A Model of Hierarchical Knowledge Representation – Toward Knowware for Intelligent Systems

Liya Ding

Faculty of Information Technology, Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai Long, Taipa, Macau SAR, China

Received:
November 5, 2006
Accepted:
August 8, 2007
Published:
December 20, 2007
Keywords:
hierarchical knowledge representation, automatic construction of knowledge hierarchy, knowware for intelligent systems
Abstract

We propose a model for multiresolutionary knowledge representation; define concepts of domain, application, and working hierarchies; and discuss inference mechanisms in the knowledge hierarchy. We also introduce an automatic construction of the knowledge hierarchy for the development of intelligent systems.

Cite this article as:
Liya Ding, “A Model of Hierarchical Knowledge Representation – Toward Knowware for Intelligent Systems,” J. Adv. Comput. Intell. Intell. Inform., Vol.11, No.10, pp. 1232-1240, 2007.
Data files:
References
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