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IJAT Vol.13 No.5 pp. 679-690
doi: 10.20965/ijat.2019.p0679
(2019)

Paper:

Improved Method for Synchronizing Motion Accuracy of Linear and Rotary Axes Under Constant Feed Speed Vector at End Milling Point – Investigation of Motion Error Under NC-Commanded Motion –

Takamaru Suzuki*,†, Kazuki Yoshikawa*, Toshiki Hirogaki*, Eiichi Aoyama*, and Takakazu Ikegami**

*Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University
1-3 Tataramiyakodani, Kyotanabe-shi, Kyoto 610-0394, Japan

Corresponding author

**DMG MORI Co., Ltd., Yamatokoriyama, Japan

Received:
July 17, 2018
Accepted:
June 20, 2019
Published:
September 5, 2019
Keywords:
5-axis machining center, synchronous motion, machined shape error, servo, torque saturation
Abstract

A 5-axis machining center (5MC) is noted for its synchronous control capability, making it a feasible tool for quickly and accurately machining complicated three-dimensional surfaces such as propellers and hypoid gears as it is equipped with a direct-drive (DD) motor in the rotary axis. The current research work identified the necessity of improving both the accuracy of the machined shape and the consistency of the free-form machined surface. A method for maintaining the feed speed vector at the milling point by controlling two linear axes and the rotary axis of a 5MC to improve the quality of the machined surface was investigated. Additionally, a method was proposed for reducing the shape error of machined workpieces by considering differences in the servo characteristics of the three axes. The shape error was significantly reduced by applying the proposed method using a precedent control coefficient determined via calculations. To maintain the feed speed vector at the milling point in the machining of complex shapes, rapid velocity change in each axis is often required, leading to inaccuracy caused by torque saturation at a DD motor in the rotary axis. The results of this study indicate that torque saturation can be evaluated via simulation and that the machining accuracy and consistency can be improved by accounting for these errors using the proposed precedent control coefficient method.

Cite this article as:
T. Suzuki, K. Yoshikawa, T. Hirogaki, E. Aoyama, and T. Ikegami, “Improved Method for Synchronizing Motion Accuracy of Linear and Rotary Axes Under Constant Feed Speed Vector at End Milling Point – Investigation of Motion Error Under NC-Commanded Motion –,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.13, No.5, pp. 679-690, 2019.
Data files:
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Last updated on Sep. 19, 2019