single-rb.php

JRM Vol.34 No.3 pp. 523-526
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2022.p0523
(2022)

Paper:

Design and Fabricate of Reconnaissance Robots for Nuclear Power Plants that Underwent Accidents

Yohei Kobayashi, Shunsuke Kanai, Chihiro Kikumoto, and Kohtaro Sakoda

National Institute of Technology, Maizuru College
234 Shiroya, Maizuru, Kyoto 625-8511, Japan

Received:
December 6, 2021
Accepted:
May 10, 2022
Published:
June 20, 2022
Keywords:
nuclear power, reconnaissance robot, Fukushima, decommissioning, social doctor
Abstract
Design and Fabricate of Reconnaissance Robots for Nuclear Power Plants that Underwent Accidents

Developed reconnaissance robot Fukuzuru

This paper presents a robot developed for reconnaissance at a nuclear power plant that had an accident. When an accident occurs, such as the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, rubble is scattered on the premises, increasing the radiation dose. Consequently, it is nearly impossible for humans to enter the plant and assess the situation. Therefore, a robot that performs reconnaissance is required. In this study, we designed and fabricated a reconnaissance robot to be used in a nuclear power plant that has undergone an accident. The inaccessibility of the scattered on-site rubble and high radiation dose can be addressed by employing an airship-type design that does not use electronic devices.

Cite this article as:
Y. Kobayashi, S. Kanai, C. Kikumoto, and K. Sakoda, “Design and Fabricate of Reconnaissance Robots for Nuclear Power Plants that Underwent Accidents,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.34, No.3, pp. 523-526, 2022.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] S. Suzuki, “Human Resource Development Through the Creative Robot Contest for Decommissioning,” J. of the Robotics Society of Japan, Vol.36, No.7, pp. 483-486, 2018 (in Japanese).
  2. [2] T. Doi and S. Suzuki, “Summary of the third HIRO creative RoboCon and characteristics of the robots participating in that – Application of high mobility mechanism with passive wheels unit –,” Proc. of JSME Annual Conf. on Robotics and Mechatronics (Robomec), 2P2-M07, 2019.
  3. [3] S. Kino, E. Takada, S. Suzuki, Y. Ohta, and T. Suzuki, “Education for human resource development in the nuclear field in National Institute of Technology,” J. of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Vol.57, No.9, pp. 612-615, 2015 (in Japanese).
  4. [4] H. Asama, “Remote technology for decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station,” J. of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Vol.62, No.3, pp. 125-126, 2020.
  5. [5] S. Onitsuka, “Present status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant decommissioning,” J. of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Vol.62, No.3, pp. 121-124, 2020 (in Japanese).
  6. [6] S. Hirose, E. F. Fukushima, and S. Tsukagoshi, “An Optimal Steering Control for the Articulated Body Mobile Robot,” J. of the Robotics Society of Japan, Vol.12, No.5, pp. 759-765, 1994 (in Japanese).
  7. [7] S. Hirose, “Machine Design of Mobile Snake-Like Robots,” J. of the Robotics Society of Japan, Vol.28, No.2, pp. 151-155, 2010 (in Japanese).

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, Opera.

Last updated on Sep. 27, 2022