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JRM Vol.30 No.4 pp. 504-512
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2018.p0504
(2018)

Review:

Tsukuba Challenge: Open Experiments for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots in the City – Activities and Results of the First and Second Stages –

Shin’ichi Yuta*,**

*Shibaura Institute of Technology
3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548, Japan

**Tsukuba Challenge Steering Committee
1-1-1 Kenkyu Gakuen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8555, Japan

Received:
May 17, 2018
Accepted:
May 31, 2018
Published:
August 20, 2018
Keywords:
Tsukuba Challenge, autonomous mobile robots, autonomous navigation in real city environment, open experiment, real world
Abstract
Tsukuba Challenge: Open Experiments for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots in the City – Activities and Results of the First and Second Stages –

Test run in Tsukuba Challenge in an environment full of pedestrians

The Tsukuba Challenge is an open experiment for autonomous mobile robotics researchers who want to build small mobile robots capable of autonomously moving through real and populated pedestrian environments. The Tsukuba Challenge started in 2007 and has been run every year since then. Each year, the self-contained mobile robots of participated team are tasked with autonomously navigating more than 1 km of a given pedestrian pathway through the city. As of 2017, the final year of the second stage, a total of over 500 teams have taken a part in this challenge, by trying to develop their own robot hardware and software to complete the given task. In this paper, the basic concept and the history of Tsukuba Challenge are first explained, and then what has and has not achieved is discussed.

Cite this article as:
S. Yuta, “Tsukuba Challenge: Open Experiments for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots in the City – Activities and Results of the First and Second Stages –,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.30, No.4, pp. 504-512, 2018.
Data files:
References
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Last updated on Sep. 20, 2018