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JRM Vol.28 No.6 pp. 781-789
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2016.p0781
(2016)

Paper:

A Suitable Design of Assist System for Human Meal by Reducing Maneuverability Variance in Workspace

Kiyotaka Fukui* and Katsuyoshi Tsujita**

*Major in Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology
5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585, Japan

**Department of Electric and Electronic Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology
5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585, Japan

Received:
February 17, 2016
Accepted:
June 25, 2016
Published:
December 20, 2016
Keywords:
exoskeletal assist system, maneuverability variances in workspace, kinematically admissible design
Abstract

A Suitable Design of Assist System for Human Meal by Reducing Maneuverability Variance in Workspace

A suitable design for the assist system for human meal

Some persons require assistance with their movements during meals. A support system for such persons would be invaluable. However, in designing such a system, crucial challenges such as freedom of movement arrangement and maneuverability of the system without disturbing human body movement have to be overcome. In this study, we extracted the major modes of human meal movement from meal movement motion-capture data and derived a suitable and feasible arrangement that reduces maneuverability variance in the workspace via iterative calculations based on inverse kinematics. The results of analyses indicate that the shoulder’s extension/flection and external/internal motions and the elbow’s extension/flection are suitable arrangements that give the freedom to equalize maneuverability in the workspace.

Cite this article as:
K. Fukui and K. Tsujita, “A Suitable Design of Assist System for Human Meal by Reducing Maneuverability Variance in Workspace,” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.28, No.6, pp. 781-789, 2016.
Data files:
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Last updated on Nov. 12, 2018