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JRM Vol.23 No.5 pp. 684-700
doi: 10.20965/jrm.2011.p0684
(2011)

Paper:

Practical Education Curriculum for Autonomous Mobile Robot (Project Learning Program for School Based on Subsumption Architecture)

Yoshihiko Kawazoe, Masaki Mitsuoka, and Sho Masada

Graduate School of Engineering, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fukaya, Saitama 369-0293, Japan

Received:
March 6, 2011
Accepted:
June 29, 2011
Published:
October 20, 2011
Keywords:
robotics, practical education curriculum, autonomous mobile robot, subsumption architecture, perception and action
Abstract

There are presently no robots around us in our society if we define a robot as an autonomous machine working in the arena of offices, homes, disaster sites, etc., not in factories. Mechatronics, dynamics, and robotics involving humans are a world of strong nonlinearity. This paper investigates the approach to the emergence of the target behavior of an autonomous mobile robot by learning with Subsumption Architecture (SA) to break through the problems of the conventional robotics with the SMPA (Sense-Model-Plan-Act) framework in the real world. It has showed the way things are learned in the real world with SA and has been developed into a practical curriculum for education as an introduction to robotics that has an intellectual and emotional appeal.

Cite this article as:
Yoshihiko Kawazoe, Masaki Mitsuoka, and Sho Masada, “Practical Education Curriculum for Autonomous Mobile Robot (Project Learning Program for School Based on Subsumption Architecture),” J. Robot. Mechatron., Vol.23, No.5, pp. 684-700, 2011.
Data files:
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