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JACIII Vol.10 No.6 pp. 773-781
doi: 10.20965/jaciii.2006.p0773
(2006)

Review:

Everyday-Language Computing Project Overview

Ichiro Kobayashi*, Michio Sugeno**, Toru Sugimoto***,
Shino Iwashita****, Noriko Ito**, Michiaki Iwazume*****,
and Yusuke Takahashi******

*Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Ootsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610, Japan

**Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394, Japan

***Shibaura Institute of Technology, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548, Japan

****Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0982, Japan

*****National Institute of Information and Communications Technology

******Justsystem Corporation, Aoyama bldg., 1-2-3 Kita-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-8640, Japan

Received:
January 29, 2006
Accepted:
February 28, 2006
Published:
November 20, 2006
Keywords:
everyday language computing, systemic functional linguistics, semiotic base, text understanding and generation, language-based application systems
Abstract

This paper explains an overview of everyday language computing (ELC) promoted by the Laboratory for Language-Based Intelligent Systems, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN from 2000 to 2005. The objective of ELC was to develop a language-based intelligent system. To do this, we constructed a computational model of language in context, called the Semiotic Base, and developed computational algorithms for text understanding and generation, which are basic information processing in the ELC framework. Based on these resources and algorithms, we constructed a computing environment in which language is used as an information medium to process information. To demonstrate its feasibility, we developed language-based applications such as a language-based wordprocessor, language-based programming, and “smart” help. We explain the basic principles of ELC, outline of its basic technologies, and discuss applications developed based on the ELC framework.

Cite this article as:
Ichiro Kobayashi, Michio Sugeno, Toru Sugimoto,
Shino Iwashita, Noriko Ito, Michiaki Iwazume, and
and Yusuke Takahashi, “Everyday-Language Computing Project Overview,” J. Adv. Comput. Intell. Intell. Inform., Vol.10, No.6, pp. 773-781, 2006.
Data files:
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