single-au.php

IJAT Vol.17 No.1 pp. 21-31
doi: 10.20965/ijat.2023.p0021
(2023)

Research Paper:

Evaluation of Dressing Condition Based on Quantification of Grinding Wheel Surface Conditions

Gen Uchida*,†, Takazo Yamada*, and Yuta Iwasaki**

*College of Science and Technology, Nihon University
1-8-14 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308, Japan

Corresponding author

**Graduate School of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan

Received:
July 2, 2022
Accepted:
August 24, 2022
Published:
January 5, 2023
Keywords:
grinding wheel, dressing, dressing overlap ratio, grinding wheel surface condition, grinding characteristics
Abstract

Different grinding wheel surface conditions affect the ground surface roughness and grinding resistance during the grinding process. In addition, as the grinding wheel surface condition changes depending on the dressing conditions, the difference in the dressing conditions significantly affects the grinding characteristics. However, the dressing condition is affected by factors such as the dressing lead, depth of dressing cut, and tip shape of the dresser. Thus, optimum dressing conditions are difficult to achieve. Furthermore, even if the dressing is applied under the same dressing conditions, the grinding wheel surface condition will differ as the tip wear of the dresser progresses. There is a need for a method to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between the dressing conditions, grinding wheel surface condition, and grinding characteristics while considering the difference in the tip shape of the dresser. Thus, the relationship between the tip shape of the dresser and dressing conditions was evaluated using the dressing overlap ratio. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different dressing overlap ratios on the grinding wheel surface condition and grinding characteristics with different grain sizes. Consequently, even if the tip shape of the dresser changes, the effect of the different dressing conditions on the grinding wheel surface condition and grinding characteristics could be quantitatively determined using the dressing overlap ratio. Furthermore, the relationship between the calculated successive cutting-point spacing, area of active abrasive grains, and grinding characteristics could be quantitatively evaluated for grinding wheels with different grain sizes.

Cite this article as:
G. Uchida, T. Yamada, and Y. Iwasaki, “Evaluation of Dressing Condition Based on Quantification of Grinding Wheel Surface Conditions,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.17, No.1, pp. 21-31, 2023.
Data files:
References
  1. [1] K. Suzuki and K. Takahashi, “Studies on the dressing of grinding wheel (1st Report) – Measurement on the number of grains per unit area by the point counting method, and variation of dressed surfaces –,” J. Jpn. Soc. Precis. Eng., Vol.30, No.3, pp. 246-252, 1964 (in Japanese).
  2. [2] U. M. Srivastava, “Review of dressing and truing operations for grinding wheels,” Int. J. Eng. Sci. Technol., Vol.5, No.1, pp. 8-19, 2013.
  3. [3] H. Sakamoto and S. Shimizu, “Generation process of cutting-edge distribution on grinding wheel with single-point diamond dressing,” J. Jpn. Soc. Abras. Technol., Vol.55, No.8, pp. 487-492, 2011 (in Japanese).
  4. [4] N. Yoshihara, H. Takahashi, and M. Mizuno, “Effect of the abrasive grain distribution on ground surface roughness,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.16, No.1, pp. 38-42, 2022.
  5. [5] M. Fujimoto, S. Ohishi, R. Hinaga, and Y. Kubo, “Wheel working surface topography and grinding force distributions in creep feed grinding,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.12, No.2, pp. 223-229, 2018.
  6. [6] D. Axinte, P. Butler-Smith, C. Akgun, and K. Kolluru, “On the influence of single grit micro-geometry on grinding behavior of ductile and brittle materials,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf., Vol.74, pp. 12-18, 2013.
  7. [7] S. Matsui and J. Tamaki, “Study on the dressing of grinding wheel – Effects of dresser type on the wheel surface topography –,” J. Jpn. Soc. Precis. Eng., Vol.52, No.4, pp. 698-704, 1986 (in Japanese).
  8. [8] S. Hagiwara, T. Obikawa, and E. Usui, “Edge shape distribution on dressed grinding wheel surface,” J. Jpn. Soc. Precis. Eng., Vol.56, No.1, pp. 164-168, 1990 (in Japanese).
  9. [9] B. Linke, “Dressing process model for vitrified bonded grinding wheels,” CIRP Annals, Vol.57, No.1, pp. 345-348, 2008.
  10. [10] J. Badger, S. Murphy, and G. E. O’Donnell, “Acoustic emission in dressing of grinding wheels: AE intensity, dressing energy, and quantification of dressing sharpness and increase in diamond wear-flat size,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf., Vol.125, pp. 11-19, 2018.
  11. [11] K. Wegener, H. W. Hoffmeister, B. Karpuschewski, F. Kuster, W. C. Hahmann, and M. Rabiey, “Conditioning and monitoring of grinding wheels,” CIRP Annals, Vol.60, No.2, pp. 757-777, 2011.
  12. [12] S. J. Pande and G. K. Lal, “Effect of dressing on grinding wheel performance,” Int. J. Mach. Tool Des. Res., Vol.19, No.3, pp. 171-179, 1979.
  13. [13] T. C. Buttery, A. Statham, J. B. Percival, and M. S. Hamed, “Some effects of dressing on grinding performance,” Wear, Vol.55, No.2, pp. 195-219, 1979.
  14. [14] V. Pacitti and C. Rubenstein, “The influence of the dressing depth of cut on the performance of a single point diamond dressed alumina grinding wheel,” Int. J. Mach. Tool Des. Res., Vol.12, No.4, pp. 267-279, 1972.
  15. [15] ISO 25178-6:2010, “Geometrical product specifications (GPS) – Surface texture: Areal – Part 6: Classification of methods for measuring surface texture,” 2010.
  16. [16] G. Uchida, T. Yamada, K. Miura, and H. S. Lee, “Measurement of grinding wheel surface shape by measured focus position recalculation method,” J. Jpn. Soc. Abras. Technol., Vol.64, No.3, pp. 140-145, 2020 (in Japanese).
  17. [17] G. Uchida, T. Yamada, K. Ichihara, M. Harada, K. Miura, and H. S. Lee, “Evaluation of grinding wheel surface shape on difference multiple helical dressing condition,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.15, No.1, pp. 57-64, 2021.
  18. [18] G. Uchida, T. Yamada, K. Miura, and H. S. Lee, “Quantitative evaluation of grinding wheel surface condition and effect of dressing condition on characteristics of grinding,” J. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., Vol.86, No.892, doi: 10.1299/transjsme.20-00284, 2020 (in Japanese).
  19. [19] G. Uchida, T. Yamada, K. Ichihara, M. Harada, and T. Kohara, “Evaluation of the relationship among dressing conditions using prismatic dresser, dressing resistance, and grinding characteristics,” Int. J. Automation Technol., Vol.16, No.1, pp. 12-20, 2022.
  20. [20] W. B. Rowe, M. N. Morgan, H. S. Qi, and H. W. Zheng, “The effect of deformation on the contact area in grinding,” CIRP Annals, Vol.42, No.1, pp. 409-412, 1993.
  21. [21] X. Kang, J. Tamaki, and A. Kubo, “Effect of cutting edge truncation on ductile-regime grinding of hard and brittle materials,” Int. J. Manuf. Technol. Manag., Vol.9, Nos.1-2, pp. 183-200, 2006.
  22. [22] G. Uchida, T. Yamada, K. Miura, and H. S. Lee, “Prediction of grinding finished surface taking into account elastic and plastic behavior at abrasive grain and workpiece,” J. Jpn. Soc. Abras. Technol., Vol.65, No.9, pp. 497-499, 2021 (in Japanese).
  23. [23] M. Yokogawa and Y. Furukawa, “Dressing performance of prismatic monocrystalline diamond dresser,” J. Jpn. Soc. Precis. Eng., Vol.60, No.6, pp. 803-807, 1994 (in Japanese).
  24. [24] T. Yamada, H. S. Lee, and K. Miura, “Quantitative estimation of abrasive grain behavior and elastic recovery of workpiece in grinding operation,” J. Jpn. Soc. Abras. Technol., Vol.55, No.12, pp. 723-728, 2011 (in Japanese).

*This site is desgined based on HTML5 and CSS3 for modern browsers, e.g. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, Opera.

Last updated on Feb. 08, 2023